NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

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Post by FystyAngel on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:04 pm

I'D LIKE TO KEEP THIS THREAD FOR TRANSCRIPT THAT NANCY GRACE IS FEATURING ON HER NEW SHOW. PLEASE FEEL FREE TO START A THREAD ON ANY OF THE CASES & DISCUSS THEM THERE.
THANK YOU...
~FYSTY~

PS....PIPER...J4A...PLEASE FEEL FREE TO EDIT TO ADD PICTURES, VIDEO AND/OR ARTICLES FOUND. THANK YOU.



Last edited by FystyAngel on Mon Jan 31, 2011 7:46 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Post by FystyAngel on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:05 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Baum-b10


January 17, 2011
Lindsey Baum: Nancy Grace America's Missing
Posted: 02:38 PM ET
On the evening of June 26, 2009, 10-year-old Lindsey Baum disappeared


Lindsey was visiting a friend’s house about a half-mile away (6 blocks) when her friend’s mother asked her to walk home before it got too dark. Lindsey left her friend’s house to make the approximate 10 minute walk back home. She was last spotted by a resident driving through town who saw Lindsey walking around 9:15PM. When Lindsey did not arrive home, her mother called police at 10:50PM.

In the small town of McCleary, WA (approximate population is 1,550) which is about 30 miles East of Olympia, someone must know something about Lindsey’s disappearance. Please help us find Lindsey Baum.

Tipline: (866) 915-8299 Gray’s Harbor Sheriff’s Office
Reward: $30,000
Missing since: 6/26/09
From: McCleary, WA
Age at disappearance: 10
Date of birth: 7/7/98
Height: 4’10’’
Weight: 80 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown/Dark Blonde

Features:
-Scar above her left eye
-Dark brown birth mark on right wrist
-Colored fillings in teeth

Clothing:
-Long sleeve hooded shirt
-Light bluish/gray jeans w/ knees cut out
-Black slip on American Eagle shoes w/ rubber soles (no socks)
-Bathing suit under clothes (red, white & blue in color for both pieces for mismatched bottoms: floral print, top stripes & pokadots)






11-Year-Old Timothy Greene Missing in North Carolina; Girl Scout Lindsey Baum Missing in Washington

Aired January 17, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Where were you the night Lindsey Baum disappeared?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Somebody has seen something, somebody has heard something. Somebody knows something.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Please bring my daughter home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Here`s what detectives had to work with. Lindsey was last seen walking home from a friend`s house in McCleary.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It was still daylight outside.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Blocks from her home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Wouldn`t stay out that late after dark.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She never made it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No screams for help.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No sign of Lindsey Baum.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No screams or anything.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police, volunteers and search dogs.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scouring the woods. Divers searching under water.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Detectives don`t know what happened.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No suspect named and a limited list of persons of interest.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: How did she vanish without a trace?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We want people to see who she is. We just want her back.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Tonight, NANCY GRACE: AMERICA`S MISSING. Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. 50 people, 50 days. For 50 nights, we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a 10-year-old girl, a Washington Girl Scout, Lindsey Baum, vanishes into thin air after leaving a little friend`s house, just before her 11th birthday, never seen again. Police and FBI searching homes and storage facilities as grainy surveillance video emerges from a local gas station. Is there finally a break in the case?

But first tonight, breaking news, live, North Carolina, an 11-year-old boy goes missing from his own home. Out to Marlaina Schiavo on the story. Marlaina, what happened?

MARLAINA SCHIAVO, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Nancy, the parents of 11- year-old Timothy Greene are desperately searching for him. He was at home at 9:00 a.m. when his father left for work, and then by 10:15 when his brother got up, he was gone. No trace of him anywhere. And the troubling part is that the father said he did not take any belongings with him, which indicates that this was not a planned leaving on Timothy`s part.

Now, there has been one update today. We just got right before we came to air, there was some surveillance video at a local convenience store that may be Timothy. The parents were asked to come down by police to view the video. They said they couldn`t really make it out, but they spoke to a teacher who also viewed the video, and they think that this could be Timothy traveling with two other boys. And now the police would like to talk to the parents of those boys.

GRACE: The tip line, 704-638-5333. This is the Salisbury Police Department. We`re talking about a little boy, just 11 years old. He goes missing. Name, Timothy, answers to Tim. Take a look. He is 4`7, just 75 pounds. He`s got a little mohawk. He was wearing a gray hoodie and gray sweatpants over red and blue shorts. He may be wearing white and blue sneakers. Family says he is grieving over the death of his mother. Help us! Look.

Tonight, police searching, grainy surveillance video emerges from a local gas station. To Jean Casarez. What do you know, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT: Well, Nancy, this is urgent. This little boy is surviving in cold, cold weather, and he needs to be found. And what makes this so sad, as you were saying, is that his own biological mother passed away a year and a half. Before she died, she told the couple that ultimately adopted him to please take him in and to help him find a family. They adopted him, but he`s not over his own mother`s death. That could have been a motive for him to leave his home this morning.

GRACE: Everybody, we`re taking your calls live. 50 nights, we go live, looking for 50 people. Many of the cases cold, some warm, some red hot.

As we go to air tonight on a missing Girl Scout Lindsey Baum, we get information about this little boy, James Timothy Greene, goes by the name Tim. He is age 11. Take a look. The tip line is 704-638-5333.

Marc Klaas, president and founder of KlaasKids Foundation, what do we do, Marc? What do you make of the circumstances under which he went missing?

MARC KLAAS, KLAASKIDS: I`ll tell you what needs to be done. Law enforcement has to get flyers of this little child out to every other law enforcement agency, media outlet, convenience store, fast food outlet, malls, strip mall. So that they can place it in their window. And if there`s another such sighting, they`ll maybe be able to bring this boy home and give him the help that he needs.

GRACE: To Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst, director of Cold Case Squad. This case is still hot. What should police do?

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: They`re doing the right thing, Nancy. They`re following up on every single lead. And frankly, you`re doing the right thing, letting people see his face, knowing where he may be. The other thing, following up with the teacher, that was brilliant, brilliant.

GRACE: OK. Back to Marlaina Schiavo, before we go to the Lindsey Baum case. Rehash. I want to hear exactly what you know about this 11- year-old boy.

SCHIAVO: Well, like you said, he lost his mother and he was grieving, so they think that he might have left to maybe go look for relatives on the mother`s side. However, Nancy, police have talked to relatives in the area and they haven`t found him yet and no one has seen him. He was at home at 9:00 a.m. His father went to work. His brother got up at 10:15 and noticed Timothy wasn`t there. His father contacted people at the school that he goes to. We`re trying to figure out if he went to go play with someone. And then police said at 2:00 p.m. they got the call, they`ve been looking for him ever since.

GRACE: Tip line, 704-638-5333.

And now we go live on the case of Lindsey Baum. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: To me, it`s quite frustrating. I know that the law enforcement is doing everything they possibly can. I mean, if anybody saw anything that night, I just wish they`d come forward.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Or heard anything. They might not even realize that they saw or heard something significant. It could be anything. A strange car driving through town that you`ve never seen before, or somebody that looked kind of out of place or somebody that you know, your neighbor may be acting a little suspicious or maybe had clawmarks on their face. You know, Lindsey has very long fingernails and she`s not afraid to use them as a weapon. Anything could mean everything to finding our daughter.

I just, I want to say to whoever has my daughter to please just let her go. I don`t -- I don`t care who you are. I don`t care where you are. I just want my daughter back. And if you would just drop her off in a public place or call me and I`ll meet you somewhere, I don`t care, I just want my daughter back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Please, just bring my daughter home. You know, give us peace of mind. Let her go unharmed. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Getting worse and worse every day that goes by. I still feel in my heart, I know she`s alive, but every day that goes by is just agony.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: To just disappear, your child, your daughter. A lot of people have given up, but not her family. Tonight, her mother is joining us live, but first to Jean Casarez. Jean, I want to go through the details of Lindsey`s disappearance.

CASAREZ: Well, it all began when she left home to go visit a friend, go to a friend`s house to play. She was at the friend`s house for only 10 to 15 minutes, and the father of the little play friend said, you know, you need to go back home. And, remember, this is western Washington, so in the summer months, June 26th, actually, 2009, she -- it was daylight at 9:00 when she probably about left that little play friend`s house. At 9:15, she was spotted by a motorist that knew her about halfway home, but she never got home. She never returned. And that is when her mother got into action and called the police that night.

GRACE: Jean, how far away was the little friend?

CASAREZ: Nancy, it was about four blocks away. That close. Very close. And this is a very small town. Nancy, the police force in McCleary, Washington, four. They had four in their police force when this happened. So it was a relatively crime-free area, small-town America.

GRACE: She only had two blocks to go. We are taking your calls. Out to Doug McDowell, morning host, KBKW News/Talk. He`s joining us from Aberdeen. Doug, thanks for being with us. I`m sure you recall when Lindsey Baum went missing.

DOUG MCDOWELL, MORNING HOST, KBWK NEWS/TALK: Oh, absolutely. It was big news here, and the whole, all of Grays Harbor was just kind of struck by the seriousness and how quickly she just vanished into thin air. And the thing is, is this hasn`t stopped. People are still concerned. I have the sheriff on my show once a month, Sheriff Mike Whelan, Grays Harbor County sheriff, and each time we have him on, we kind of recap what`s happened so far. And it`s really amazing that with all the tips that have been coming in and the FBI helping as well, they haven`t been able to locate her or the assailant if she was, indeed, abducted or whatever happened. It`s just like she disappeared into thin air.

GRACE: Out to the lines. Amanda in Wyoming. Hi, Amanda.

CALLER: Hi, Nancy. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. Thank you for calling. What`s your question?

CALLER: You know, there`s so many people in the cities nowadays, and to think that nobody has seen her is -- it`s hard for me to believe.

GRACE: You know, I agree. And I`m just looking at these photos, Amanda in Wyoming, and I just saw the picture of Lindsey Baum in the car seat, asleep. Now, that`s love. When you are looking at your child asleep and they`re so -- you love them so much, you just have to take a picture of them.

CALLER: I completely agree. I have three children myself, and two step children and one of my own. To tell you that the thought of somebody not seeing my child walk home from school or not seeing my child walk home from a friend`s house is very frightening to me. There should be -- there`s somebody out there that knows, that saw what happened to that little girl. I guarantee it. They`re just not saying anything because they`re afraid to say it nowadays.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lindsey didn`t run away. She was taken. There`s no doubt in my mind. She didn`t run away. And if she has the opportunity to get to a phone or to get away, she`s going to come home or she`s going to call 911 or she`s going to call -- the only number she knows by heart are my home phone and my cell phone, and she does not have her cell phone with her. So if she gets the opportunity to call, it`s going to be one of those numbers.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re trying to get information about the missing girl.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: 10-year-old Lindsey Baum was last seen walking home from a friend`s house.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was supposed to walk five blocks to get home. She never made it the half mile to her house.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I still feel in my heart, I know she`s alive.

We`re not giving up on her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: How could nobody see anything?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Searchers retraced the girl`s last known steps.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are not able to rule anything out.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police, volunteers and search dogs have been looking for Lindsey.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We have no evidence to point us in any specific direction.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vanished out of thin air is what it appears to be. There`s nothing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`ve tried to keep the thought of somebody grabbing her out of my mind. She wouldn`t stay out that late after dark. She doesn`t like to be outside by herself.

And if somebody does have her, I wish they would just drop her off somewhere where she can get to a pay phone and call 911 or call home so that we can come and get her.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: 50 nights, 50 of America`s missing. 2,300 people go missing in America every single day. Mothers, fathers, boys, girls, your children and grandparents, gone. Many people give up. Their families still hoping for the best.

Tonight, we are taking your calls. The spotlight tonight on Lindsey Baum. She left just before her 11th birthday, just around the corner, just four blocks away to a little friend`s house.

Joining me right now and taking your calls live, Melissa Baum, this is Lindsey`s mother.

Melissa, thank you for being with us. What can you tell us about the day Lindsey went missing?

MELISSA BAUM, MOTHER: It was just a normal, beautiful sunny day. They`d just gotten out of school for the summer, and she was swimming over at a friend`s house with quite a large group of their friends, and she had come in to take a shower and was going to run down to her best friend`s house along with her friend to get some clothes for her to spend the night. And 30 minutes later, they weren`t back yet. So I tried calling the friend`s house and found that Lindsey had left about 15 to 20 minutes prior to that. And she just never made it home.

GRACE: What time of the day or night was it?

BAUM: She -- it was about 9:15.

GRACE: Was it still daylight?

BAUM: It was. Otherwise she wouldn`t have left the house at all. But it was still daylight, and it actually didn`t get dark until a little after 10:30 that night.

GRACE: Now, Melissa, you`re saying that she left to go get some clothes for another little friend and she left with someone?

BAUM: She left with a group of friends, to include her brother and her best friend that was going to spend the night.

GRACE: What happened to them? When did they peel off?

BAUM: At some point on the way to her friend`s house, they all kind of dispersed, and my son had come home. And Lindsey and Mikaela (ph) went on to her house. And I guess Lindsey was just over there for just a few minutes, and something happened where Mikaela wasn`t able to spend the night after all, and so Lindsey headed home by herself.

GRACE: And how long --

BAUM: And didn`t make it.

GRACE: -- would that walk take, what, 10 minutes, 15 minutes?

BAUM: At the most, oh, no, no more than ten minutes.

GRACE: And when did it strike you that she was gone?

BAUM: I knew something was wrong by 10:00 when we couldn`t find her, even though I kept thinking maybe she had gotten sidetracked and -- or ran into another friend and was maybe up at the park or, you know, somewhere right there close by and just not paying attention to the time. But we were out looking for her and calling her friends, trying to find her. But by the time dark set in, I was -- I was in a panic. I knew she`d be home before dark. She wouldn`t stay out past dark.

GRACE: The tip line, 866-915-8299. There is a $30,000 reward. Somebody out there knows where this little girl is. This little Girl Scout who has gone missing.

Take a look at Lindsey Baum, at 10 years old. 4`9, 80 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. Was wearing a light blue hooded pullover shirt and blue jeans. Only went four blocks. And when she was spotted by a neighbor, she was just two blocks from home.

Back to Lindsey`s mom, Melissa, with us tonight. Melissa, who else was at home that night?

BAUM: Just myself and my son.

GRACE: And how old is your son?

BAUM: At the time, he was 11. 12, sorry. He was 12.

GRACE: OK.

BAUM: He`s 14 now.

GRACE: When it got to be 10:00, Melissa, what did you do?

BAUM: It was shortly after that that we contacted law enforcement.

GRACE: So let me get this straight. What time did she leave Mikaela`s house?

BAUM: She left Mikaela`s house about 9:30.

GRACE: So about 9:30, she was to walk home, just four blocks, still daylight. At 10:00, you knew it was all wrong.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What I`m here today to do is to appeal to everybody out there watching, please bring my daughter home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Where is Lindsey Baum?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was taken just a short walk from her friend`s house to her home in McCleary, Washington. She never made it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nothing that was found on the computer or on her cell phone has led to anything definite.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you know anything, contact the hot lines, contact any 911 centers.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It has afforded us the opportunity to talk to some more people.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Please, bring my daughter home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: But nothing specific about her disappearance.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: She only had two blocks left to get home. It was broad daylight in the summertime, just two blocks away from her mother, who was waiting for her with open arms.

We are talking about a little Girl Scout, Lindsey Baum. Take a look. There is a $30,000 reward. Her family has never given up. Tip line, 866- 915-8299. We`re taking your calls live. To Jessica in Kentucky. Hi, Jessica.

CALLER: Hello. I understand and I want to say my heart goes out to the family. But even though it was daylight, could it have been kind of dark? Because I know in summertime, you know, when it`s still light, it`s still kind of dark, and for it to be, you know, five blocks away -- I have a 10-year-old daughter. She`s not allowed out of my sight because it`s getting so bad out there. I won`t even let her walk home from the bus stop because you never know what`s going to happen. But could it be that, you know, maybe it wasn`t as bright as, you know, like, sunny, sunny day? It could have been...

GRACE: Let`s find out. Let`s go to Melissa Baum, this is Lindsey`s mother joining us from McCleary, Washington. Melissa?

BAUM: It wasn`t, like, sunny bright, no, but it was still perfectly daylight out. But the point was she wasn`t supposed to walk home by herself. She just did it, rather than calling me.

GRACE: She was supposed to come back with her little friend, Mikaela.

BAUM: Right.

GRACE: To Sheryl McCollum...

BAUM: And Mikaela wasn`t able to...

GRACE: You go ahead. Go ahead, Melissa.

BAUM: I was just going to say because -- when Mikaela wasn`t able to come back, Lindsey should have called me, but for whatever reason, she didn`t. She just left the house and walked home.

GRACE: Crime analyst, director of Cold Case Squad, Pine Lake PD, author of "Cold Case: Pathways to Justice." Sheryl McCollum, help us out.

MCCOLLUM: Nancy, there`s absolutely no physical evidence in this case. That`s one of the factors that law enforcement is having to deal with. They have nowhere to turn. They`re waiting on somebody to come forward. And that is, again, the reason this show is so vital tonight.

GRACE: Which means to me she was taken by car two blocks from her parent`s home.

MCCOLLUM: Absolutely.

GRACE: Now, what do we know about the neighborhood? The area? Was it near an interstate? Was it near a shopping center? What do we know about the neighbors surrounding her? These are the questions we have got to look at, in the search for 10-year-old Girl Scout Lindsey Baum.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A 10-year-old girl vanishes just blocks from her home. Her mom says someone kidnapped her. Where is Lindsey Baum?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: How did she vanish without a trace?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just know that she was coming back from her friend`s house and did not come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every passing hour, new worries that the friendly girl who would talk with anybody is in serious trouble.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Relentless search to find her, special plane equipped with heat-sensing cameras, scouring the woods, divers searching under water, sniffer dogs covering the ground.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police haven`t found any evidence to explain her disappearance, and her dad is getting desperate.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Please, if anybody knows anything, even if you don`t think it`s important to you, it may be very beneficial to this case in bringing Lindsey home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We`re going to take you right back to the case of the missing 10-year-old girl scout out of Washington, Lindsey Baum. Joining us is her mother. But first, we are just getting in information now that we have put up the tip line, the number and our e-mail, we`re getting information from all across the country. Take a look at Maiah Sylvester, 12 years old, 5`2", 130 pounds, blue hooded sweatshirt, blue jeans, brown boots, last seen by mother.

She was taking out the trash outside her own home, New Orleans. Out to Natisha Lance on the story. Natisha, what can you tell me about Maiah Sylvester? She`s just 12 years old.

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER, COVERING STORY: She`s just 12 years old, Nancy. She has not been seen since yesterday shortly before 6:00 p.m. Just as you said, she was taking out the trash. The garbage made it into the trash, but Maiah did not make it back into the home. Her mother thought that she was back in the house, but then later realized she was not there.

Now, what we have found out at this point is that friends of Maiah have now come forward and told her mother that she had met someone on Facebook. She had been communicating with a man. The mother believes that he`s an older gentleman but does not think that they had made contact, and she does not think that they had a long-term relationship going on. But New Orleans police is urgently asking for the public`s help to take a look and see if we can find Maiah Sylvester.

GRACE: Marc Klaas, this just happened Sunday. This girl statistically could very well still be alive. Explain.

KLAAS: Well, of course, she could be alive. And in fact, the vast majority of missing person cases, Nancy, do end successfully. The victim or the missing person is found and reunited with their family. They have to look at the electronic -- the electronic evidence in this case. They have to find out if, in fact, this girl`s MySpace or Facebook page is connected with an older guy and follow those leads, because you don`t just walk out your back door, empty the garbage and disappear.

It seems to me that there is some kind of a plan behind this, and obviously, they have to work very quickly to get this girl home as quickly as possible.

GRACE: You know, I don`t get it, Caryn Stark. Older guys, 12-year- old girls, Facebook. Explain.

CARYN STARK, PSYCHOLOGIST: Well, Facebook is perfect for someone who`s a child molester, Nancy. We were talking about the whole idea of have things really gotten worse, remember, one of the callers said that?

GRACE: Yes.

STARK: And, in part, there is more media attention, but there is the internet. There`s much more availability for people who are interested in 12-year-old girls or 11-year-old girls to be able to track them and communicate with them and get what they`re looking for even if we know that it`s the wrong thing to do. Kids are too young and too innocent to understand that.

GRACE: You know, she may very well not have known to whom -- with whom she was communicating online. Everybody, we`re talking about a 12- year-old little New Orleans girl. Take a look at Maiah Sylvester, 5`2", just 130 pounds, 12 years old, went to take the trash out, just yesterday. And practically, the last 24 hours, she`s gone. Her mother needs help tonight.

Tip line, 504-821-2222. That`s the New Orleans Police Department. Unleash the lawyers. Anne Bremner, high profile lawyer out of Seattle, Randy Kessler, defense attorney, Atlanta. Anne Bremner, if this is connected to someone she`s met online, an adult online, he has left an electronic trail a mile wide.

ANNE BREMNER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: He has. And that`s the problem. There`s also a lot of e-crimes as we call them with, you know, criminal impersonation and everything else, but, like they said, in the social network, you don`t write in pencil on the internet, it`s in ink. And it`s indelible ink, and so, there`s quite a trail out there.

GRACE: And to you, Randy Kessler, something Marc Klaas said was extremely interesting. What he said about the timing. You know, I`ve always said there`s no coincidence in criminal law, Randy Kessler. The fact that she walks out of the door to go take out the trash and then boom, she`s gone. Does that mean she thought she was hooking up with a little friend online, or does it mean this little friend online was sitting there like a hawk, a bird at prey, outside of her door and saw her come out?

RANDY KESSLER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, it could be a combination of both. It`s no defense. It doesn`t get the criminal off the hook if he did something wrong. But, you know, that`s why they`re going to interview the mother and say, did she seem anxious to take out the trash? Was it something that kids don`t like taking out the trash? I didn`t like taking out the trash, but if she was a little more eager to say, mom, I`ll do it. You know, is there something I can do, that may give a telltale sign. But you got to look at every single thing. If there`s a guy that did something wrong, that is not a contributory part on her part. He`s guilty.

GRACE: Absolutely not. Absolutely not. She`s just a child. She`s not held accountable for her actions in a case like this. To Jean Casarez, what more do you know, Jean?

CASAREZ: You know, I think what we don`t know is critical here. Did this person that she was communicating with know where she lived? I think that`s something that investigators are going to look for because she took the trash out last night, Nancy, Sunday night at 6:00 p.m. and never heard of again. I think everybody needs to remember she was wearing a blue hooded sweat shirt, blue jeans, brown boots and she`s 5`2", 130 pounds and only 12 years old.

GRACE: Tip line, 504-821-222.

And now, back to Lindsey Baum, the missing Girl Scout. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BAUM: We want to keep her face out there. We want people to see who she is. And just to appeal to whoever has her or if you know somebody that does have her, if you suspect somebody that may have her, we just want her back. We just, we love her and we miss her so much. And every day without her is absolutely unbearable. We just want her back. That`s all we want right now is we just want her back and want her back safe.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are talking about a 10-year-old little cheerleader. She was just two blocks away from home when she was last spotted. Her mother is taking calls live, along with the rest of the panel. Out to the lines, Dorothy in Arizona. Hi, Dorothy.

DOROTHY, ARIZONA: Hi, Nancy. Hi, first, I`d like to say I`m really sorry to hear, you know, what the parents are going through, but my question is why did they rely on the child to make sure that she would call or something like that before she left the other friend`s house? Because I know, like, with my kids when my daughter would go up the street, her best friend was three blocks away, and if one of my friends couldn`t take her, we had a game plan where I would stand outside, watch her walk up to the corner, and the neighbor on the corner would come out, I`d call her, she`d watch her go around the corner until she made it to the other girl`s house.

GRACE: You know what Dorothy, that`s a really good idea. I want to go to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation. You know what, would have, could have, should have. Isn`t it true that when a child goes missing, the parents beat themselves up? I could have done this, I should have, I would have. It doesn`t matter. There was a predator looking for this girl. She was supposed to walk home with her friend, Michaela. That`s the plan. They had a plan in place. But she`s 10. She didn`t follow the plan.

KLAAS: And Melissa understands this and realizes that this perfectly illustrates that little kids should not be out walking alone. They should always be with another person simply because there`s strength in numbers, and it`s a good idea for kids 10 and over to have cell phone. You know, cell phones keep you connected, and they`re also GPS compatible. So, if there is an emergency, theoretically, you would be able to follow that. Now, Nancy, I`ve been to McCleary. I know this area a little bit. And I can tell you that it`s a very small cutoff community.

There are no attractions there. It`s completely surrounded by the rainforest. You can stand in the middle of town, and you`re really no more than 200 yards from the rainforest in almost any directions. There`s about 1, 500 people that live there. Not a lot of people come there that don`t belong there. I think there`s two possibilities here. I think the first possibility and the most likely one is that she is a crime victim and that the person that committed that crime is probably within, lives within a block or two of where Lindsey live. The other possibility is that she ran away.

GRACE: To Dr. Panchali Dhar, it`s been a year and a half. Can we determine cause of death if her remains are found?

DR. PANCHALI DHAR, MD, INTERNAL MEDICINE: Well, if she was strangled, that would be difficult to do because she`s completely skeletonized. Now, let`s say the bones have fractures or dents, then, it would mean that there was a blunt instrument used or some kind of trauma was done to her.

GRACE: We are hoping to bring Lindsey home alive to her mother, Melissa, who is joining us tonight.

As we go to break, please, help us find another of America`s missing. Jennifer Pool, 39 years old, vanishes April 28th, 2010, Bay Shore, New York. White, female. 5`6", 140 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. Take a look. Tattoo on neck says "Joey." If you have information, please call 800-220-8477. If your loved one is missing and you need help, go online, CNN.com/NancyGrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SCOTT BAUM, FATHER OF MISSING 10-YR-OLD GIRL, LINDSEY: My name`s Scott Baum. I`m Lindsey`s father. I`m in from Tennessee. What I`m here today to do is to appeal to everybody out there watching, please bring my daughter home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls in the search for a missing 10-year- old girl scout out of Washington. Lindsey Baum last seen only two blocks from her mom`s home. Out to the lines. Christine, Louisiana. Hi, Christine.

Hi, dear, what`s your question?

CHRISTINE, LOUISIANA: My question is, when Lindsey was swimming at these people`s homes, my thing is the people that allow her to swim there, they took control over her safety. And when it was time for her to go home, whether it was day or night, an adult should have been monitoring her going, making sure that this child gets back home safe. That was not done. And my question is, why wasn`t that done?

GRACE: You know what, that`s a really good point. I want to go out to Melissa Baum. This is Lindsey`s mother. What did the family say?

BAUM: Well, the family -- they feel horrible. I hold no blame to them, no. At this point, I could blame myself, I could blame them, I could spend the rest of my life putting blame. The fact is, it happens. And ultimately, the only person who blame is the person who stole my child. And I just can`t live full of the anger and frustration and blame. I have to get through each day, and I have to find my daughter. And I speak to their -- her parents on a regular basis almost every day.

She`s become quite a good friend of mine. And I know the guilt she feels and it -- hindsight`s 20/20, and if you have ever lived in a town of 1,400 people, you know, and you can see from one end of the street to the other, basically, you just get caught up. You develop a false sense of security without even realizing it. So, no, she shouldn`t have been home. And she did have a cell phone.

But none of us knew at the time that she had left it at home on the charger which was all the more proof that Lindsey intended on coming straight back because she didn`t walk out the door, she didn`t leave her bedroom without her cell phone in her hand.

GRACE: We are showing shots of Lindsey now. There is a $30,000 reward. Out to the lines. Samantha in Maryland. Hi, Samantha.

SAMANTHA, MARYLAND: Hi, Nancy. Thank you for taking my call. My question this evening is, is there any other video, surveillance, anywhere she could have been? Maybe with a certain someone or anything out there other than the gas station?

GRACE: Let`s talk about the gas station video. What do we know? Out to Doug McDowell, morning host KBKW Newstalk. What can you tell me about this surveillance video, and what about searching a storage facility?

VOICE OF DOUG MCDOWELL, MORNING HOST, KBKW NEWSTALK: Well, with the video, I think that`s the only one that exists, the one that was taken at the Shell station. I believe one of those people came and identified themselves. And then, in July, the Grays Harbor County sheriff`s office, they were searching in McCleary for the missing girl, of course, Lindsey Baum. And under Sheriff Rick Scott told the (INAUDIBLE) that they were searching a house and they also searched a storage area and they turned up no smoking gun or red flag to, quote, "Scott," (ph) when they made this search.

But then, they did something else, too, and the FBI had some inmates from Cedar Creek Corrections Center, and this was in October, go and search dense vegetation where she could have been at one point or -- and then maybe moved or placed there if, indeed, something had happened to her. And they wanted to recheck all of that ground. In fact, the superintendent, Douglas Cole, of the Cedar Creek Corrections Center said that the inmates genuinely were interested in trying to solve this case.

But, when you, you know, hear Melissa, I mean, McCleary is the last place you would ever think that something like this would happen, and so, I can see why all the parents would be totally, you know, flabbergasted by what has happened here because you just would not expect it.

GRACE: To Jean Casarez, give me the significance on this gas station, this 7-11 convenience store video, and I want to talk about potential person of interest buying donuts that day. What does this video mean to me? What`s the significance of buying donuts and why was the storage facility searched, Jean Casarez?

CASAREZ: All right. The video is significant because she would have walked by that Shell gas station on the way home. It was just released, Nancy, this surveillance video. And there were some unknown people that they were trying to find. One man stepped forward and said, I was just passing through town, but I still think they have not been able to identify some of the other people in this video.

As far as the donuts, there have been five search warrants executed in this case, Nancy. They are fascinating to read, and I say that on a legal sense, but the donuts come from a man who voluntarily allowed people in his home, law enforcement, but probable cause that he had been dealing in child porn on his computer. And he said that he had gotten donuts on the day that Lindsey Baum went missing.

GRACE: But he`s diabetic.

CASAREZ: But he`s diabetic.

GRACE: He got donuts for whom?

CASAREZ: For the children.

GRACE: What children?

CASAREZ: What children? I don`t know.

GRACE: Out to the lines. Nowasa in Kentucky. Hi, Nowasa.

NOWASA, KENTUCKY: Hi, Nancy. I`ve been trying to get a hold of you for, like, four years.

GRACE: Thank you.

NOWASA: I`ve got a set of twins, myself, and I love seeing your pictures that you show. But this devastates me. We live in a world where we cannot trust anybody. We can`t trust our neighbors. We can`t trust -- we don`t know our best friends, who they could turn out to be. And it just -- this is -- I`m curious to know, the little girl went to this person`s house. And yes, it might have been they`re best friends and all that, and I have no right to say anything bad at some people, but did they even give a call to the mother to say, hey, she`s walking home?

GRACE: That`s a good question. That`s a good question, Nowasa in Kentucky. What about it, Miss Baum? Did they call to let you know she was coming home?

BAUM: No. And again, there was -- they had a lot of stuff -- something had gone on, so they kind of were in the middle of something apparently at the time she left and just didn`t think to call me.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Families left behind, wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: It`s been interpreted that you are concerned the boyfriend had something to do with Hailey`s disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That bothers me a lot.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nine days ago, Shawn (ph) says Hailey told him she was going to her father`s house then to a friend`s house down the road.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: God gave her to us. We want her back.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I want her home. She`s been gone too long and they say after so long that she might not come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I am getting worried that maybe my baby didn`t leave on her own.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We want to believe that somebody has that baby.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I want to believe that she did give him away, so that maybe he`s safe and he`s with somebody that`s taking care of him right now.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s a very real possibility that Elizabeth killed Gabriel. It`s also a possibility that she handed Gabriel of to somebody else.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The guys are saying things about diaper bag and stuff, and it`s -- we just don`t want to hear that.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Elizabeth Johnson, 7/24/86.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She appeared something totally different than she wound up being.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Child abuse, a class 2 felony and one count of kidnapping.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And we feel quite duped.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She`s currently facing charges of kidnapping which is a class 2 felony. Child abuse which is a class 4 felony, and custodial interference.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nobody will forget you, Nonnie, and we`ll keep looking for you until we find you, OK? We just want you home. We just want you home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This is a picture of Stepha Henry taken at Club Peppers in Sunrise may 29th, the same day the woman visiting from New York went missing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She never give us any, you know, any reason to do something like this.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We love you, and everyone else loves you. And they would love to see you home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Henry was planning on law school next year and loves legal mysteries.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`ll protect you as you come. Now and forever, amen.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9:00 sharp eastern. And until then, we are looking. Keep the faith, friend. Goodnight.

END


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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:07 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Campbe10

January 18, 2011
Hasanni Campbell: Nancy Grace America's Missing


Posted: 08:35 AM ET

Hasanni Campbell, who suffers from cerebral palsy and wears braces on both legs, was last seen outside of a shoe store in Oakland, CA on Aug. 10, 2009.


His foster father, Louis Ross, was the last to see him after leaving him in the car while he took Hasanni’s one-year-old sister to the front of the store to meet up with his fiancé, Jennifer Campbell. Within a matter of minutes the 5-year-old was gone when Ross returned to the car. Suspicion has surrounded Hasanni’s foster parents who were both arrested on suspicion of murder but were never charged. However, Louis Ross remains the prime suspect in the missing person case. No witnesses who saw Hasanni after he disappeared.

Tipline: (510) 777-8572
Missing Since: 08/10/09
Missing From: Oakland, CA
Classification: Missing / presumed dead
Age at Disappearance: 5
Height: 3’
Weight: 40 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black
Identifying Characteristics: Has cerebral palsy and has orthopedic ankle braces
Clothing: Gray sweatshirt and gray pants





5-Year-Old Child With Cerebral Palsy Missing; Where Is Missing Mom Rena Marroquin?

Aired January 18, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on "Nancy Grace."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There is a god.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: "The Nancy Grace Show" was out there for us.

NANCY GRACE, CNNHN HOST, "NANCY GRACE": Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

GRACE: August 10th, 2009, five-year-old Hassani Campbell vanishes in the blink of an eye.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hasanni Campbell was born with cerebral policy. The five-year-old boy wears braces on both legs, making it all the more confounding how he could simply disappear. Hassani`s foster dad reportedly tells police he left the child alone when he briefly leaves his car to drop off Hassani`s one-year-old sister with family at a store.

LOUIS CAMPBELL, MISSING FIVE YEAR OLD BOY`S FOSTER DAD, PRIME SUSPECT IN DISAPPEARANCE: I pulled into that parking spot then proceed to basically get out of my side, walk around, open up the door for Hassani. And then I proceed to the front of the store. I see their aunt. She knows why I`m there. I tell her, open up the back door.

I then circle back the same way I came, right around the corner, to basically hand over Alia. By the time I got there, Jennifer`s already out of the store walking toward me asking, where`s Hassani?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ross immediately calls police. Once on the scene, investigators fear Hassani was either kidnapped or hiding. Search and rescue dogs are given the three foot boy`s scent, but his scent is never picked up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We frantically searched the neighborhood, asking people if they`d seen his son, and nobody could find him.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: With no evidence the little boy was even at the store, the story changing and a failed polygraph, the foster father remains the prime suspect in the little boy`s disappearance.

GRACE: Mr. Ross, I understand you did not pass your polygraph, is that true?

ROSS: That`s what I`ve been told. Correct.

GRACE: What were the questions they asked you?

ROSS: Do I know where Hassani is?

GRACE: Ross and his fiancee Jennifer Campbell are arrested for suspicion of murder but later released for lack of evidence.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A $75,000 reward remains in effect for information in the case of five-year-old Hassani Campbell.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America. They disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping but never forgotten. And neither have we.

Fifty people, for 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, grandparents. Gone, but where?

Tonight, a missing five-year-old boy with cerebral policy, little Hassani Campbell vanishes outside a shoe store in a busy suburban shopping center. How could Hassani just disappear and nobody sees a thing?

The last person to see him, foster dad Louis Ross, who fails an FBI polygraph. Shocking text messages reveal the foster dad at one point threatens to abandon Hassani at a train station. In a stunning twist, police arrest the foster dad and the mom on suspicion of murder, but released just three days later.

Tonight, we learn foster dad moves across country from California to Maryland after he then loses custody of Hassani`s one-year-old sister. Why? Where is five-year-old Hassani? Straight out to Henry K. Lee, reporter with the "San Francisco Chronicle," author of "Presumed Dead." Welcome, Henry. What can you tell us?

HENRY K. LEE, REPORTER, "SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE": Good to see you, Nancy. Unfortunately not much is being publicly told about this case. The case remains open. It is not a missing person`s case but a homicide case. We do not know where Hassani Campbell is. Police are looking for his body but they have no idea where he is.

GRACE: Why did the foster father lose custody of the sister as well?

LEE: In cases like this, Nancy, the police will off put in their two cents to social services at child custody hearings. So I am sufficed to say those are closed hearings, but they probably had a lot to tell them behind closed doors, Nancy, about why they suspect Louis Ross in Hassani`s disappearance and apparent murder.

GRACE: Joining us, Jean Casarez, legal correspondent "In Session." What more can you tell us?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Nancy, this is so tragic because he was different than most little children in this country. He had cerebral palsy, and he had braces on his ankles that went into his shoe so he could walk. And on this day in August, the caregiver who was the boyfriend, Louis Ross, took him to the back of the shoe store because that`s where the foster mother, Jennifer Campbell, worked.

He opens up the car and he said he saw little Hassani taking his seat belt off, and then he walked around to the front carrying the one-year-old, and the whole point was to open up the back door for Hassani. But when they opened up that back door, he was gone, just evaporated into thin air, and that was the last that anyone ever saw him.

GRACE: The way I recall the story is that he says he drives, he leaves Hassani in the back at the backdoor then drives around front. Is that the way it went, Henry Lee?

LEE: He made some kind of a potentially convoluted statement that he had pointed his BMW in a specific part of the street, go around tell Jennifer Campbell of the shoe store to say I`m here. But he suggests Hassani was kidnapped or walked out of the car on this own. Police are telling us from day one they don`t believe Hassani ever made it to Oakland.

GRACE: Let me go out to Sergeant Gus Galindo with the Oakland PD joining us. Thanks for being with us.

SERGEANT GUS GALINDO, OAKLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT (via telephone): Good evening, Nancy, how are you?

GRACE: I`m great. I`ve never forgotten this case about Hassani. It stuck in my mind from the very, very beginning. Tell us your recollection of what the story was, how this little boy went missing.

GALINDO: Well, the child was reported missing by Louis Ross to us. He called 911 and gave details he parked at the back of the Shoes of Rockford store here in Oakland, and he went around the front to contact Jennifer Campbell to have her open the rear door of the business. And Louis Ross said he walked to the front --

GRACE: Right there, why would you leave the baby in the back? I don`t understand up that.

GALINDO: He gave certain responses to that question and we did ask him that. Based on the case being still an open investigation, we can`t really divulge that. but he couldn`t articulate why, but he said when we walked back he saw no signs of Hassani Campbell.

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Unleash the lawyers, Darryl Cohen, Alex Sanchez, Darryl out of Atlanta, Alex out of New York. Darryl, you have children. I don`t -- I mean, when I have the twins, I don`t leave them out in a public place alone. I`m practically afraid to leave them in the back yard and look through the window. In fact, I don`t leave them in the backyard by themselves, much less at the back of a shopping mall?

DARRYL COHEN, ATTORNEY: Nancy, I have three girls.

GRACE: Have you driven behind the backs of the stores where there`s nothing but dumpsters and cardboard boxes and liquor bottles?

COHEN: I don`t leave my girls anywhere. My oldest is 16, nine and 11. They go nowhere without me being so visible, overprotective you can call it. But because they are children they have to be protected and if it can happen, it will, and it`s seldom if ever good.

GRACE: Hang on a moment, Darryl. Alex, can you see a video, a monitor? Liz, did I see little Hassani walking down the aisle of that store? Take a look. You`re going to see Hassani walking down, this is from the Oakland police department video. There he is on the left. Take a look. There you go. There he is with the foster father, mother, and they`re shopping. Keep it on that video, Liz. Sergeant Gus Galindo joining us, Oakland PD, what video is it that we`re seeing? Explain.

GALINDO: That is the family four days before the disappearance of Hassani at a store shopping for various items. And it`s the last footage we have where anybody saw Hassani Campbell. There are no reports of Hassani Campbell from that time on from the time he went missing other than what was reported by Louis Ross and Jennifer Campbell.

Let me clarify. You`re describing this location as a shopping mall. It`s basically a residential area, a neighborhood with commercial shops basically around the corner from residents. So it`s not a shopping mall.

GRACE: I thought it was like a strip center, like a shopping, outdoor shopping center?

GALINDO: No, ma`am, it`s a commercial area and the building where this happened, there`s apartments that you can enter through the front or the back as well as the business. So it`s basically one building that has various addresses, but it`s not a shopping mall.

GRACE: I see. So was it, in fact, a shoe shop, as he told me?

GALINDO: I don`t recall specifically what he told you, if he said it was a shopping mall, but similar to what he said to you, yes.

GRACE: OK, back to you, Henry K. Lee, reporter with the "San Francisco Chronicle," author of "Presumed Dead," you know what, that`s a really good point the sergeant`s pointed out for us. What can you tell me about that area?

LEE: As Sergeant Galindo tells us, it`s what we call the Rockridge neighborhood of Oakland in the northern part of the city, a very well to do area full of nice restaurants. It`s a tonier neighborhood of Oakland, that`s a turn of phrase I use. Crime is present but not as prevalent in other parts of the city.

So when we heard a little boy may have been kidnapped, disappeared from that area, a lot of red flags went up. How is it possible a five- year-old boy with cerebral palsy with arch support braces, how could he disappear in broad daylight with so many people in the neighborhood in that area of town? It was possibly not possible.

GRACE: We`ll be right back with our lawyers and the rest of our panel taking your calls.

But case alert -- last night we covered an 11-year-old North Carolina boy who vanished on Friday, returns home to his adoptive parents. Jim James, Timothy Green, he goes by Tim, found safe and sound.

And tonight, 12-year-old Maya Sylvester who we reported on last night, just 12, goes to empty the trash and went missing Sunday around 6:00 p.m. After our show last night, she was recovered. Miracles happen, both of them safe and at home.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: More than a dozen police officers have fanned out in this area looking for five-year-old Hassani Campbell. Alameda County Sheriff`s rescue team has joined the search with dogs. Police say around 4:00 they received a call for help from the five-year-old boy`s father. He told officers he drove his son to Shoes of Rockridge where the boy`s mother works so he could leave the child in her care.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I know I`m innocent.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I told them the same story I gave the previous time.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I know Louis is innocent.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: They got the same story.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Authorities in Oakland, California, are searching for clues in the case of missing five-year-old Hassani Campbell who is disabled with cerebral palsy.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He was last seen we his foster father Louis Ross when he leaves Hassani behind to the back door of an Oakland shoe store to let him in from the outside and meet his foster mom.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Within a few minutes the aunt, Jennifer Campbell, said she opened the door but Hassani was gone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I thought maybe he was hiding behind something or maybe he was joking or maybe it was something.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I say, what do you mean? Where`s Hassani? I look around to the side and he`s no longer there.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police searched for six hours, but they say there were no witnesses who could place Hassani behind the store other than Ross.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We`re taking your calls. To Maria in Texas. Hi, Maria.

MARIA, FROM TEXAS: Hi, Nancy. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

MARIA: My question is -- actually I don`t have a question. I have a comment. We see this every single day. I watch your show all the time, all the time. What is going on with mothers not taking care of their kids?

When my son was born I didn`t even let my husband carry my child for, like, weeks. I didn`t trust him because he would drop him, inexperienced parents. You find someone out there on the streets, love is love, but your kids come first. Don`t you do a background check? Don`t you find out who they are? Why do you leave your kids with a stranger? I don`t understand this. I see this all the time. I`m a single parent. Why is it that us as mothers, why don`t we protect our children?

GRACE: You know what, Maria, I`ve asked that same question a million times all the way back to when I was prosecuting as a local county prosecutor. I don`t recall one case of child abuse or child molestation where the mother sided with the child. They were always siding with the father, the boyfriend, the live-in, always. I never understood it. What about it, Dr. Leslie Austin? Why?

DR. LESLIE AUSTIN, PSYCHOTHERAPIST: I don`t know why, but it`s incredibly irresponsible that people don`t prepare and really watch their kids. I really wonder if that little boy was in the car that day at all. Why didn`t anybody see him?

I understand the mom was working, but why is there in trace, no sighting for four days, no video, no neighbors, no people in the store? How could he have been there? He`s not very mobile. Why isn`t everybody looking for him, noticing, looking out for a little boy who needs help to function?

GRACE: Weigh in, Alex Sanchez.

ALEX SANCHEZ, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I think that the police are very frustrated because this fellow seems to be slipping through the legal cracks in the system. They`re pretty much convinced that he`s responsible for this child`s disappearance. He failed a polygraph test. His story doesn`t make any sense about disappearing in a public area.

And so the pieces have not come together yet and unfortunately they may never come together. I think the police made a mistake, though, by arresting him as early as they did because once they arrested him then he lawyered up and he refused to speak to the police and he moved away. That may be the end of the case at this point, unfortunately.

GRACE: You know what, Alex, you brought up something very interesting. Let`s bring up Alex and Darryl again. Alex Sanchez, New York, Darryl Cohen, Atlanta. What happened is they arrested him then three days passed.

Let`s explain the significance. Under our constitution it has been construed, you can`t just arrest somebody on suspicion then never formally charge them. You can`t just hold them without a charge because you think, well, you know, maybe they did something. Explain it, Sanchez. You got a time limit.

SANCHEZ: Yes. And they went and arrested him, apparently without sufficient probable cause. And then the prosecutor looked at the case and said, hey, you know what, we don`t have enough evidence right now and had to release him. But during that span of time he had a lawyer, and the lawyer told him, look, you may be a suspect, don`t speak to anybody.

GRACE: I mean, Darryl Cohen, at the end of 72 hours, you either got a fish or cut bait according to our constitution as it has been construed.

COHEN: You have to make the charge. So why in the world was there a rush to judgment? He wasn`t going anywhere. They knew where he was. Why did the police do that? Because they knew he did something but they couldn`t prove it and they need to wait to be able to prove it.

GRACE: To Sergeant Gus Galindo, Oakland PD. The cops, the FBI, you guys set up an FBI polygraph that he failed. Then he`s moved across country. The reality is there`s nothing you can do to stop him from moving across country.

GALINDO: That is correct, and you know, in our decision to make the arrest based on the investigative process at the time, we had developed information that led us to believe that the arrest was a proper step to take at that time in the investigation. So we did make the arrest and the district attorney determined that there were insufficient -- there was insufficient evidence at that time to charge Louis Ross.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A boy with special needs is missing. Five-year- old Hasanni Campbell has been gone for a year and a half and his foster father remains the primary suspect in his disappearance.

ROSS: I have nothing to hide, and basically I was just -- this has been a traumatic experience. We understood that the police had their job to do.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police say the father left the boy in the BMW in the back lot of the store while he walked around to the front to unlock the door. When the father opened the store`s back door, he told police his son was gone.

GRACE: Mr. Ross, I understand that you did not pass your polygraph. Is that true?

ROSS: I`ve been told my results were that I failed it 99 percent.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. I want to go out to Joni in Oklahoma. Hi, Joni.

JONI FROM OKLAHOMA: Hello, Nancy.

GRACE: Hi, dear, what`s your question?

JONI: I just got a real eerie feeling when you showed the footage of three days before, looked like a children`s store.

GRACE: Yes, yes.

JONI: The foster father has a big package in the cart. And I wondered if the police knew what happened to that box.

GRACE: You know, what about that? To Sergeant Gus Galindo. What was that he was carrying out?

GALINDO: Based on the investigation we learned that was a box that contained a car seat for a -- just a standard car seat for a child.

GRACE: The last known sighting of little Hasanni Campbell, just five years old. To Marc Klaas, president and founder of KlaasKids Foundation, child advocate. What do you think, Marc?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, you know, his story, everybody says his story doesn`t make sense, and it does make sense to him. It doesn`t make sense to anybody else. There were no surveillance cameras back there. How convenient is that? Nobody saw the little boy. There have been no sightings of the little boy. He had threatened to abandon the little boy. He had a hair trigger. He`s not a good man. He moved away. He`s erased this from his history in his mind.

And I think the police are absolutely correct. They needed to do what they need to do at that point. You know, there are organizations out there looking for Hasanni Campbell but it`s a huge world. He`s a very small boy and they have absolutely no idea where to search. This man covered his tracks very, very well.

GRACE: You know, Marc, you just touched on something important, to clarify. As Sergeant Galindo said, we felt we had enough at the time. Just because you arrest somebody and the D.A. doesn`t bring formal charges, that doesn`t mean you`ve screwed up the case. That is not the end of the road. They can be rearrested and recharged.

KLAAS: And this gave them an opportunity, Nancy, to play these two off against each other in interrogations, and apparently it didn`t work.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They described him as African-American, small for his age, three feet tall and weighs 40 pounds. He has short black hair and brown eyes. He was wearing a gray sweatshirt and sweat pants. Police are asking people in the area --

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

GRACE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: found alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

August 10th, 2009, 5-year-old Hasanni Campbell vanishes in the blink of an eye.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: HASANNI CAMPBELL was born with cerebral palsy. The 5-year-old boy wears braces on both legs, making it all more compounding (ph) how he could simply disappear. Hasanni`s foster dad reportedly tells police he left the child alone when he briefly leaves his car to drop off Hasanni`s 1-year-old sister with family at a store.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I pulled into that parking spot then proceed to basically get out of my side, walk around, open up the door for Hasanni. And then, I proceed to the front of the store. I see their aunt. She knows why I`m there. I tell her, open up the back door. I then circle back the same way I came, right around the corner to basically hand over Aliyah. By the time I got there, Jennifer`s already out of the store walking toward me asking, where`s Hasanni?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ross immediately calls police. Once on the scene, investigators fear Hasanni was either kidnapped or hiding. Search and rescue dogs are given the 3 foot boy`s scent, but his scent is never picked up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We frantically searched the neighborhood, asking people if anybody had seen his son and nobody could find him.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: With no evidence, the little boy was even at the store, the stories changing and a failed polygraph. The foster father remains the prime suspect in the little boy`s disappearance.

GRACE: Mr. Ross, I understand that you did not pass your polygraph. Is that true?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That is correct.

GRACE: What were the questions they asked you?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do I know where Hasanni is and can I get them to where Hassani is?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ross and his fiancee, Jennifer Campbell, are arrested for suspicion of murder, but later released for lack of evidence.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A $75 reward remains in effect for information in the case of 5-year-old Hasanni Campbell.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The time we lost, people could have been looking at our son and not realized it was him.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I have just been handed a tip that has been called into our control room during tonight`s show. The caller who wishes to remain anonymous says she knows the family. She says this is how it happens. There is no physical evidence in the house. Hasanni was strangled or suffocated. There were threats against the little boy in the house. There was domestic violence. Jennifer Campbell never protected the boy.

She says, Ross murdered the child in the house. Aliyah, the sister, was in the house while Jennifer Campbell was working. The child was never in the car in Oakland. Police know the child is dead. Probably disposed of in one of the industrial parks. They have no physical evidence, no fiber, no blood splatter. There were latex gloves in the back of the car. Did they alert the landfill? Out to you, Sergeant Galindo.

VOICE OF SGT. GUS GALINDO, OAKLAND POLICE DEPT: Yes, ma`am?

GRACE: What about this information that we have received? Were there latex gloves in the car?

GALINDO: There were latex gloves in the car, yes. That`s definitely clear at the time that the --

GRACE: OK. Why would he have latex -- I don`t have latex gloves in my car, do you, sergeant? Why did he have latex gloves in his car?

GALINDO: That`s the question we`d like answered.

GRACE: Well, did you ask him? And what did he say?

GALINDO: Louis Ross` statement is very critical to this case. And obviously, we interviewed him quite extensively, and actually, we conducted several interviews with him prior to arresting him and day we arrested him. That`s information that we have to keep to ourselves because it`s still an open investigation.

GRACE: I understand. What about landfills? Were the landfills alerted?

GALINDO: Yes. We searched the area that we suspected Hasanni Campbell could have been dumped, basically, or discarded, and we alerted the landfills.

GRACE: Do you believe the boy was murdered in the home, Sgt. Galindo?

GALINDO: Based on my knowledge of the case, yes, I do.

GRACE: I bet it is just killing you that you cannot right now make an arrest in this case. Do you believe Hasanni was ever at that store, ever in that car?

GALINDO: No. That`s part of the basis for us making the arrest of Louis Ross. We never believed that Hasanni Campbell made it to Oakland on the day that he was reported missing by Louis Ross. And Louis Ross was the last person with Hasanni Campbell. And it`s my belief that Hasanni met foul play at the hands of Louis Ross.

GRACE: And Jennifer Campbell, do you believe it`s true there was domestic violence in the home prior to Hasanni`s disappearance, and Jennifer Campbell did nothing to protect the boy?

GALINDO: As far as domestic violence, we uncovered no reported domestic violence in the police, but based on interviews and statements we took from people, we did learn that there was definitely disharmony in the relationship and there were some problems going on. But as far as any police reports or things of that nature, there were never any reported to us.

GRACE: I`ve got right here in front of me part of your investigation. It says that DFCS had been called out, that Ross sent a message to Jennifer Campbell, who is Hasanni`s aunt. Ross` girlfriend. It says, this is effing over. I will watch her, talking about the little girl, but I will be out on the B.A.R.T. which is a rapid transit, Bay Area Rapid Transit.

It`s your responsibility, so "F" you. There was also mentioned that he was having a lot of problems and concerns about raising a developmentally disabled child. And that he admitted to leaving the two little children, one of them age 1, at home when he went to the bank?

GALINDO: Those facts are correct. Yes.

GRACE: Oh. To Dr. Glenn Kolansky, board certified Physician, joining us out of New York. Dr. Kolansky, what would you have to find, what would you have to have left of a body to find it in a landfill?

DR. GLENN KOLANSKY, BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIAN: Nancy, it depends how long the body was left. If it`s after a year, you maybe just left with bones. Depending on what`s in the landfill, the temperature out there. You know, first the bugs come in, and as time goes on, the body is basically destroyed. After 50 days maggots come in and just either way the body and all that has left there after 50 days approximately maybe just hair and bones.

After that time, you know, other insects come in, bacteria come in, and basically, after about anywhere depending on the temperature, 50 days to a year, you`re just left with simple bones. So, at this point, it`s over a year, you may have nothing but bones.

GRACE: Joining us, Dr. Glenn Kolansky out of New York. Very quickly, I`m hearing in my ear we got news on a missing woman out of Florida, Rena Marroquin. Alexis Weed, what`s the latest?

ALEXIS WEED, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: New Year`s Eve when Rena was last seen. She was seen leaving her job at a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant in Port St. Lucie, Florida, and she was seen getting into a gray van that is owned by the estranged boyfriend of her daughter.

GRACE: And what`s the most recent?

WEED: Just last week, Nancy, on Wednesday, police recovered this van. It was in a neighboring community, 15 miles to the north of where her KFC employment was located. That van was found. Investigators haven`t said exactly what was in it, but they say they believe that Rena`s in danger. They said that there was evidence in that van that shows that she may have been injured, Nancy.

GRACE: Let`s go over the tip line. And tell me one more time, Alexis, the circumstances surrounding her disappearance.

WEED: Yes. It was New Year`s Eve. She left her job around noon. She was seen getting into this van. The van is owned by the estranged boyfriend of her daughter. They happen to have the same last name, but they`re not related, Nancy.

GRACE: Everyone, there you see the tip line, 772-871-5000. Take a look. Rena Marroquin, age 44, Ft. Pierce, Texas, last seen just New Year`s Eve.

Everyone, as you can see, we are getting information on missing people in America. We`ve had a call in tonight in our control room about Little Hasanni. Won`t you help us?

And tonight, help us find a missing woman, Heather Riggio, just 20, vanishes May 7, Miami Beach, Florida, 5`1", 110 pounds, blond hair, blue eyes, black nautical star tattoo on her back. Take a look. If you have information on Heather, call 305-471-8477. And if your loved one is missing and you need help, please, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Five-year-old Hasanni Campbell last seen behind an Oakland shoe store August 10th, 2009, when the boy`s foster father, Louis Ross, says he parked his vehicle behind the store leaving Hasanni behind.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I know I`m innocent, and I know Louis is innocent.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ross talked about being arrested and interrogated by police. He said investigators tried to deceive him shortly after their arrested his fiancee at the union city B.A.R.T. station without Ross` knowledge.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ross reportedly told authorities he left Hasanni at the back door of the store. He says he ran inside to tell Hasanni`s foster mother and aunt that he arrived to drop off the boy along with the boy`s 1-year-old sister. Ross later arrested and jailed on suspicion of murder was released after no charges were filed.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Jennifer was texting me back and forth. Her text messages didn`t make sense, but I find out she wasn`t texting -- they have her in custody, they have her cell phone texting me.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What were they texting you?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Basically, cautioned me to come out, come and get her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police say Ross who failed an FBI polygraph remains the primary suspect in Hasanni`s disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I told them the same story I gave the previous set of detectives. I told the same story I gave the other -- they got the same story, but they were not happy with the stories they got. They wanted something else.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Yes. You know what, you told me the same story, too, Ross. And I wasn`t happy with it because it doesn`t make sense. And I know where you are. You moved across country, but you didn`t get away. Right now, cops cannot make an arrest. They had arrested the foster father but let him go after three days. They needed more evidence.

During our show tonight, a tipster calls in with information we didn`t have about the foster father having latex gloves in the back of his car, domestic violence allegedly in the home, how the aunt didn`t take up for the little boy and let him be abused, a little boy with cerebral pals palsy. Out to the lines. Theda in Missouri. Hi, Theda.

THEDA, MISSOURI: Hello. Thank you for accepting my call. And I`m deeply disturbed by the information that I have been hearing. A friend of mine told me about your show, and I wanted to thank you for allowing Hasanni to even be on here. He resembles my son, Christian Taylor Ferguson, missing St. Louis, Missouri. He`s been missing since June 11th 2003. And I am so disturbed, but my feeling about this case is this.

This is my question. Could this be a copycat situation based on my son`s disappearance here in St. Louis, Missouri? The father has not been charged. He`s walking around as if nothing has occurred. They took him down for questioning. He (INAUDIBLE) questioning, lawyered up and has not responded to law enforcement or any kind of authorities here in St. Louis. Even though my situation is all over the internet and --

GRACE: Christopher Taylor Ferguson.

THEDA: Christian. C-H-R-I-S-T-I-A-N.

GRACE: Christian.

THEDA: And if you went to lookforanangel.org, which is my website, I`d started an organization, too, and I like to thank the foundation, Polly Klaas. They helped me in the past. And actually, the Shawn Hornbeck Foundation started off here in St. Louis. They came to my rescue immediately. And after the experience with them, I started my own organization called --

GRACE: Tell me the name. Tell me so I can look it up online.

THEDA: My son`s name is Christian Taylor Ferguson.

GRACE: No, I`ve got that. Your organization. Your website.

THEDA: Lookingforangel.org.

GRACE: Lookingforanangel.org.

THEDA: Yes, ma`am.

GRACE: You know what, here`s the thing, Theda, and I`m going to look it up as soon as I get off the air because I know when I get home, I pray the twins are going to be asleep.

THEDA: Yes.

GRACE: Unless the cops get enough information at the get-go --

THEDA: OK.

GRACE: If they don`t have enough, they can`t make an arrest. They can`t make him, not that he`s a target, they can`t make him come in and talk to them.

THEDA: Well, let me tell you about my case, they have enough evidence. There`s a 33-page police report. They know that this father stays the (ph) disappearance and they`re doing nothing about it.

GRACE: You know what, Theda, I`m going to look at it as soon as we get off the air and so is my whole staff. Because you know what, if we can get it on the air, how do I know another tip like the one that`s just come in about Hasanni Campbell won`t come in about Christian? We don`t know.

THEDA: That`s right.

GRACE: So, we`ll be on it. And, hey, to you, Marc Klaas, did you hear that? What about all these --

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDER, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: I did hear that.

GRACE: People you have helped over all the years.

KLAAS: You know, there is a common thread here that extends to Christian, it extends to Hasanni, it extends to Zahra Baker. Did you know that the maltreatment of children with disabilities is 1.5 the ten times higher than the maltreatment of children without disabilities? And that immediate family members perpetrate the majority of neglect physical abuse and emotional abuse against these children?

GRACE: Marc, I did know. I did know. Out to Tom Shamshak, former police chief, private investigator, instructor at BU, Boston University. What do we do now that cops have tried everything? Now, a suspect that they did have has moved across the country. Now, what can they do?

TOM SHAMSHAK, INSTRUCTOR AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY: Nancy, good evening. The police can continue to investigate. Hopefully, there`ll be an investigative grand jury at some point. I would make sure that they continue to try to figure out what occurred in terms of, you know, what happened with that child. Did this fellow purchase a container? I mean, he had his hands covered up. That could have been on a trash bag, but obviously, he disposed of something.

Again, did they check dumpsters and the likes of that? Now, the National Center for Missing Exploited Children has a volunteer group of investigators who can continue to work on this case and assist the Oakland Police Department with this case, but what you`re doing tonight is, it`s only the second night of the series, and you`re shining a bright spotlight on a social problem that this country needs to address -- Nancy.

GRACE: You know, as we`re going to air, we have just received a call out of California. There is an amber alert just issued for a 4-year-old. Juliani Cardenas. The child abducted 4:12 p.m. Tuesday. California, that would be 7:12 eastern. Suspect, Jose Esteban Rodriguez, 27, Hispanic, possibly driving a 2003 silver Toyota Corolla.

Listen. A silver Toyota Corolla, California plate, 6 H, happy, B, brother, W, why (ph) 445. An oversized aluminum wheels. Left rear wheel, spare wheel. Suspect is a non-biological ex-boyfriend of the mother. Amber alert. Danger. 6 HBW 445. Amber alert. A 4-year-old boy has been taken. Amber alert. California. The little boy, Juliani Cardenas. Can you help?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police say the father left the boy in the BMW in the back lot of the store while he walked around to the front to unlock the door. When the father opened the store`s back door, he told police his son was gone.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Their families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: These are the last images we have of 23-year-old Nadia Kersh. You`re watching the Youngman leaven on her lunch break. Police have recovered her car in West Birmingham.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nadia`s purse found on nearby railroad track. The mother of a 1-year-old boy left work to pick up her son at daycare but never arrived.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: According to Nadia`s boss at Homewood`s Tria Market, Nadia left work for lunch at 1:00 and didn`t come back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She didn`t miss work. So, we knew something was up then. And then, but when we found out that she didn`t go to get her son, then we knew something was terribly wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The two girls only had each other in this world. That`s really the only family that they know of.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police were back at Nadia`s apartment searching for clues to her disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re securing this as a crime scene, and we`re processing and gathering things to try to find, you know, financial records, medical records, things like that.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s very sad. I`m glad to know that her son`s OK. That`s what really concerned me.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re not giving up hope. Every day that goes by, common sense tells you, you know, the odds go down.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My brother never met a stranger. He was full of life. He was caring. He`d bend over backwards for you. My oldest brother, Vernon Kent Jones, left a New Year`s Eve party in the lower east side of Manhattan. Did not make it home and has not been seen or heard from since.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He was last seen in the apartment by three of his -- three people who were at the party with him. His I.D. was located in his apartment. His bank accounts were never touched. He was 23 at the time he disappeared.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s hard to remain hopeful that he`ll turn up or his remains will turn up or somebody will have a lead or some kind of information for us. But we`re just living it one day at a time.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hart Island is commonly referred to as Potter`s Field. What we need to do is just keep combing through, (INAUDIBLE) and see if we can get somebody that`s buried there under a John Doe.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My family and I have lived with this for the past 18 years, and there`s always a part of me that`s going to grieve about this until the day that I die.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`ll see you tomorrow night. 9:00 sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend. Goodnight.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:10 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Kesse-10

January 19, 2011
Jennifer Kesse: Nancy Grace America's Missing


Posted: 09:00 AM ET

Surveillance video taken from a condo complex may be the best lead police have in finding Jennifer Kesse. The 24-year-old beauty went missing on January 24, 2006 in Orlando, Florida


The video shows someone who appears to be a man dropping off Jennifer’s black 4-door Chevy Malibu about a mile away from where she disappeared. Almost 5 years later, police and Jennifer’s family believe this unidentified man is a suspect and he knows what happened to Jennifer. Kesse last spoke to her boyfriend at 10pm on January 23. She was getting ready for bed. The next day left her condo around 8AM, but she didn’t make it to a meeting at work. By 3pm Jennifer Kesse was reported missing.

Tipline: 1-866-838-1153
Reward: $5000
Missing Since: 01/24/06
Missing From: Orlando, FL
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 24
Height: 5’8”
Weight: 135 lbs
Eyes: Green
Hair: Sandy Blonde




Jennifer Kesse Disappears

Aired January 19, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just a beautiful, caring, thoughtful, kind person. Has a lot going for her. Has always been someone to reach for the stars. And, for the most part, she`s always grabbed hold of them.

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Twenty-four-year-old Jennifer Kesse was headed for a bright future. She had just purchased her first home, and she was in love. On January 24, 2006, the bright light on her future dimmed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This whole thing has just been one hellish nightmare.

GRACE: Kesse speaks to her boyfriend over the phone, for the last time, the night before she disappears. She tells him she is going to bed. The next day, friends and family are concerned when the financial analyst does not answer calls or texts. That concern only turns to terror when Kesse fails to show up for a meeting at work.

ROB, BOYFRIEND (voice over): Every day would either call me just to say good morning, have a great day, or just text me to wish me to, you know, have a good day, love you, that type of thing. And when I didn`t receive it Tuesday morning, I thought it was odd.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My personal gut feeling is she got ready to go to work, as normal, and as soon as that condominium door closed, I don`t know what happened from that point. That`s where I think it started to happen.

GRACE: Within just four hours, the young beauty is reported missing. For two days, there were no clues until Kesse`s black Chevy Malibu was found about a mile away from her home.

JOYCE KESSE: She was abducted Tuesday. The car was found Thursday about a mile from her condominium complex in an area of town that, honestly, she would never go to. There was no sign of trauma in the vehicle whatsoever.

GRACE: Grainy black-and-white surveillance video of what appears to be a man may be the best lead police have to find Jennifer Kesse.

DREW KESSE: It is our flesh and blood. We love her. Someone has taken her from us, and we want her back, now.

JOYCE KESSE: Now.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish, their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days. For 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, grandparents. They`re gone. But where? Tonight, Jennifer Kesse, brilliant, beautiful.

The 24-year-old Florida beauty, a financial analyst, vanishes just after a Caribbean vacation with her boyfriend. Back at work that Monday morning. The next Monday -- the next morning, Jennifer is gone. She`s reported missing after she fails to show up to work. No forced entry or struggle in her new condo. The shower actually still wet. But her purse, her keys, her cell phone, iPod missing. Her car found days later, dumped at another apartment complex a mile away. Still, no sign of a struggle. Jennifer`s purse never found. Cell phone, credit cards, never used. The FBI steps in but, still, can`t crack the case.

Tonight, Jennifer`s parents with us live, begging for someone, anyone to come forward and help bring their girl home. Straight out to Drew Petrimoulx with WDPO Radio. Drew, what is the latest in the Jennifer Kesse case?

DREW PETIMOULX, WDPO RADIO: Well, in about June of last year, the FBI got involved with this case. They agreed to review the evidence that the Orlando Police Department had detected. Later on in the year, Jennifer Kesse`s dad and brother were brought in for questioning. The brother was actually given a lie detector test. The father was going to be given a lie detector test but wasn`t. Basically, the FBI reviewed what OPD had and said they really couldn`t further the case any further on their end.

GRACE: You know, I don`t understand why the brother and the father would have been given a lie detector test.

PETIMOULX: It was strange. You know, when the FBI came in, they really wanted a complete review of the case, apparently. I remember hearing from Drew Kesse, who was Jennifer`s father, and he did think it was strange, but, again, the FBI, kind of, operates a little bit differently than local law enforcement. So, it was something that they thought that they wanted to do.

Again, they did give a lie detector to the brother, but they ended up not actually giving the lie detector to the father. So, it`s hard to say exactly what the FBI was doing with their -- when they took over -- took a look at the investigation.

GRACE: With us tonight, Jennifer`s parents, Joyce and Drew Kesse. Joining us out of Tampa, Florida. We`ll get to the lie detector later. Again, we are taking your calls. Out to Mickey in Texas. Hi, Mickey.

MICKI (via telephone): Hi, Nancy. It`s great to talk to you, again.

GRACE: Likewise.

MICKI: Congratulations on the twins. Thank you for sharing them with us. I have a question about her boyfriend. My question was going to be, did she have a boyfriend, and, then, I found out, yes, she did have a boyfriend. What was their relationship like between her and her boyfriend?

GRACE: You know, to my understanding, it was very good. They had just come back from a long weekend vacation to the Caribbean. I don`t believe they lived in the same area. I know they didn`t live together. What do we know, Jean Casarez?

JEAN CASAREZ: They did live in a separate area, because Jennifer lived in the Orlando area. He lived in the Fort Lauderdale area. But he is the last person to have ever heard her voice because he spoke with her at 10:00 in the evening, and that was the last time anyone heard of her.

GRACE: And, normally, he said she always texted him, e-mailed him, called him, something every morning to say have a great day, I love you. And it didn`t happen that morning.

CASAREZ: That`s right. And, coupled with that, she didn`t show up at work on January 24th, and that`s when it all began to unravel that she was gone.

GRACE: And what I find significant about this timeline is she would normally send the boyfriend a text or something, to my understanding, before she went to work, which means she went missing well before she was due at work, whatever time that was, 8:30 or 9:00, because he didn`t get that morning call.

You know, to Lillian Glass, Dr. Glass, psychologist and author joining us out of L.A. You know, people are creatures of habit, typically. I mean, usually every night people will call home to their parents, or they`ll -- if they`re out of town, they`ll call their spouse at a certain time. They do the same things day in, day out. And part of her routine was to call this boyfriend every morning. So, if she didn`t make it that morning, something was wrong.

CASAREZ: Exactly.

GRACE: That early.

CASAREZ: And that was very odd because, again, that`s when he picked up something was not right.

GRACE: But why are we like that? How much can we rely on that? Is that universally true?

CASAREZ: It is pretty much. We are creatures of habit. And, you know, Nancy, in the criminal world how people, oftentimes, return to the scene of the crime, so to speak. So, it does happen, in terms of human behavior. We are creatures of habit, and we do the same things, oftentimes, over and over again.

GRACE: Let`s go out to Jennifer`s parents, joining us out of Tampa. Drew and Joyce Kesse. To both of you, thank you for being with us.

DREW KESSE: Thank you, Nancy.

JOYCE KESSE: No, thank you.

GRACE: First of all, I don`t understand, Mr. Kesse, why the FBI wanted to give you a polygraph. You were established elsewhere at the time of her disappearance. I don`t even really understand that.

DREW KESSE: Once I got done laughing and saying, yes, hook me up, they told me that there was no time left. A polygraph should have been done. I should have really listened to what Marc Klaas had done in his case. And the first thing he did with police is say, hook me up. I never considered myself in the mix of things, to be quite honest with you. So, I didn`t think of that, but that`s the same thing that I told the FBI agent, is this should have been done on day one, not four and a half years later.

GRACE: Well, you know, did you ever think, Mr. Kesse, that as soon as you said, what? OK, sure, hook me up. As soon as you said that, it, kind of like, gets rid of the need to polygraph somebody.

Also, to you, Mrs. Kesse, what more can you tell me about what time, if you know, that she would contact her boyfriend in the morning?

JOYCE KESSE: Well, Jen, typically, left for work between 7:30 and 8:00 in the morning. And it was her habit to call Rob when she got in her car. So, as she got in her car and was driving to work is when she would make that good morning call. And, as we know, Rob never received that call.

GRACE: We`re going to go right back to Jennifer Kesse and her parents, but I`m hearing in my ear that we`ve gotten news on a missing 4- year-old out of California. Juliani Cardenas. Stacey Newman, what`s the latest?

STACEY NEWMAN: We`re tracking this amber alert as we speak. This 4- year-old beautiful little boy. Juliani was snatched from the arms of his own grandmother, Nancy, as she was watching him while his mother was at work. The suspect, 27-year-old Jose Rodriguez, he barged his way into the home, Nancy, assaulted the grandmother, pushed her to the ground, and took off with this little boy. Their grandmother listened to this little boy crying, Nancy, as the suspect drove away, kidnapping him in broad daylight.

GRACE: OK. Stacey Newman, what more can you tell me about his disappearance? It`s my understanding that he has tried to get the little boy before, and he has absolutely no blood relation to the little boy.

NEWMAN: Nancy, that same morning, he showed up at the home. The mother told him to leave. He also tried to go to the school to find this little boy. He was sick at home with the grandmother. He was determined, Nancy, to kidnap this little boy.

GRACE: Everybody, we are talking about Juliani Cardenas, he`s only 4 years old. Take a look. The suspect, Jose Esteban Rodriguez, 27, he`s the mother`s ex-boyfriend. Tip line, 209-552-2472, that`s the Santa Fols (ph) County Sheriff`s Department. There is a reward. This man intent on getting the 4-year-old boy. But why, Stacey?

NEWMAN: He was with the mother, Nancy, he wanted to be in this boy`s life. She broke off the relationship. Fast-forward to today, this boy is missing. He`s been kidnapped.

NANCY: INAUDIBLE. He needs me. He misses me. He loves me. More than he loves Jose. He needs to come home. He needs to go to school.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Orlando investigators believe 24-year-old Jennifer Kesse was abducted the night of January 24, 2006, on her way to her job as a financial analyst. Kesse was last heard from when she made a call to her Fort Lauderdale boyfriend the night before she vanishes.

DREW KESSE: Around 10:00 she was in bed. We talked briefly. No problem at all.

GRACE: The next morning, the financial analyst never makes it to work at central Florida investments.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It just looked like she got up and got ready to go to work as any other day she would get up and get ready to go to work, to us.

JOYCE KESSE: There was nothing amiss. You know, typical Jen. Leaving for work, makeup out on the counter, hair dryer.

GRACE: The day she`s reported missing, someone is caught on grainy surveillance video. But without a clear shot of the suspect`s face investigators are having a hard time making a positive ID.

JOYCE KESSE: Search your soul. Show some remorse. Somebody knows something. And that`s all we`re begging for.

GRACE: We are taking your calls tonight. Straight out to a Gail in Florida. Hi, Gail.

GAIL (via telephone): Hi. I was just wondering if it`s possible that somebody from the ship that they were on had followed her home.

GRACE: Hmm. What about it, Pat Brown? Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler," joining us out of D.C.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, I, sort of, doubt that because so much time passed between when she got home, and when, apparently, she got ready for work to go out. I believe the person was there at that complex, either living there, visiting somebody there, or working there.

I think the police need to go back to that complex and find out who that person is because they took her car. They didn`t have their own vehicle. And, then, they dumped the car about a mile away, which is very common when someone just needs to get rid of the car, they don`t want to walk too far, but they get rid of the car and then walk on home, or walk back to work.

GRACE: Joining us tonight, Mr. and Mrs. Kesse. Drew and Joyce Kesse, Jennifer`s parents. To you, Joyce Kesse. I seem to recall that there was something about the area where the new condos were. Were there transients and was it a gated community?

JOYCE KESSE: Yes. And just, also, if I might, Nancy, to clarify, Jennifer was not on a cruise. She, actually, flew out of Fort Lauderdale to Puerto Rico, then on to St. Croix. So, the one caller had indicated a cruise. It was not a cruise.

GRACE: Right. I heard that.

JOYCE KESSE: To answer your question, boy --

GRACE: Transients in the area.

JOYCE KESSE: Thank you, transients. It was a gated security-guarded complex. And, yes, they had hired, unfortunately, illegal workers and allowed the illegal workers to live in some of the empty apartments. It was an apartment complex undergoing condo conversion. And, with sadness, Jennifer was one of the first people who closed. So, there were renters living at that same complex, but she had voiced to many people an uneasiness. The workers would stop and stare. They did not make obscene gestures. They didn`t wolf whistle. They made her feel uncomfortable.

DREW KESSE: And, Nancy, in Florida, it`s very common, within a mile of almost any home in Florida, you can have a million dollar home and you can have a $20,000 home. It`s -- where she chose to live was very much the premier property and area of Orlando, up and coming. But, yes, it is -- any place that you see in Orlando that has trees, there`s homeless living in it.

GRACE: So, my question is, then, these immigrants, I`m getting the suggestion that -- were any of them illegal?

DREW KESSE: We not only know that they were illegal immigrants working on property, Nancy, they were, actually, allowed to stay in unused vacant apartments. So, they did not have to pay for rent. They could work late and be there early. And, in fact, the 24th, the morning of the 24th when all this broke loose, probably by the time -- well, by the time we got there, everyone was pretty much vanished, as far as workers are concerned, and a minimal staff showed up the next day. So, there was a lot of illegals. We know that there was a lot of illegals. Police tracked illegal workers that were there. And, in fact, it continued up until about a year ago. They continued -- that complex continued to let illegals work in there.

GRACE: You know, that`s incredible. I want to see that shot again. You just showed it, Liz. One of the last clues we`ve got in the disappearance of this Florida beauty, Jennifer Kesse. Take a look at this guy, walking in front -- that`s in front of her condo, right?

LIZ: No, that`s where her car was dropped off.

GRACE: Where her car -- oh, thank you. Thank you very much. Take a look at that, Marc Klaas. What do you make of it?

MARC KLAAS: Well, it`s a very strong clue. They know it was her car. They know it`s that person. They`ve identified that person as someone between five foot three and five foot five. That, certainly, starts to limit the suspect population. And, hopefully, they`ll be able to continue to enhance those pictures. It will jar somebody`s mind.

GRACE: Right.

KLAAS: Something will come of it.

GRACE: Joining me, right now out of Washington, D.C., Eleanor Odom, felony prosecutor, death penalty qualified. Eleanor, you`ve got so much experience in this area. Weigh in.

ELEANOR ODOM, FELONY PROSECUTOR: Well, Nancy, what`s so important, as someone else just mentioned, the timeline of this case. And it never hurts with a cold case to go over the timeline, in detail, and see what you can figure out from that.

GRACE: You know, what, Eleanor, that`s exactly what we do. Stay with us. Right now profiling Jennifer Kesse. With us live tonight, taking your calls, her parents, Drew and Joyce Kesse. Where is Jennifer? Tip line, 866-838-1153.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: The 24-year-old beauty went missing on January 24, 2006. Kesse speaks to her boyfriend over the phone for the last time the night before she disappears. She tells him she is going to bed. The next day, friends and family are concerned when the financial analyst does not answer calls or texts. Jennifer`s Chevy Malibu was found just two days later only a mile from her apartment complex.

Surveillance video shows what appears to be a mystery man driving Kesse`s car at a nearby condominium complex.

Eleanor`s right. Let`s nail down the timeline. Let`s go through it, Jean Casarez.

CASAREZ: 10:00 p.m., January 23rd, the last time she talks with her boyfriend. A very nice phone call. The next morning, her makeup was found, her pajamas were found. It looks like she spent the night in her apartment. It looks like she left for work. Her brother had stayed in her apartment while she was on vacation. He had some guys over. One of them left a cell phone. So, she had that cell phone. It is believed to be put in a drop box to get to that person. He never, ever received that cell phone. It was never seen again. She did not get to work on that day, January 24th, and she never spoke with her boyfriend, like she usually did, between 7:30 and 8:00.

GRACE: To Jennifer`s father and mother, Drew and Joyce. Drew, tell me the condition of her apartment.

DREW KESSE: Her condition, it was, obviously, brand new. She had just purchased it --

GRACE: I mean that morning. What did it look like? Had she made breakfast? Had she done her hair? What?

DREW KESSE: No. It looked like she slept in her bed. She had two or three outfits laid out on the bed as if she was choosing an outfit to wear. She -- as was stated, the bathroom looked like someone got ready to go to work. The rest of the condo was just perfect. It, honestly, looked like a maid came through. Right down to a full setting -- four-piece setting -- table setting on her ding room table.

Her -- right inside the front door was her luggage that she used on vacation. She just came in and dropped it and went to bed. And, unfortunately -- you know, one thing that I do want to bring up is in the morning at 7:30, every Tuesday, since we actually lived in Jennifer`s condo four times longer than she did, eight months, every Tuesday morning, which she was taken on a Tuesday, we believe, at 7:30, landscapers started to cut the entire complex at her building. And they were told they saw nothing.

GRACE: You know, that is significant. Every Tuesday morning, 7:30 a.m., they come to landscape. And they all say they saw nothing?

JOYCE KESSE: Exactly.

DREW KESSE: Correct. And she, also, had a pedophile living next door that we found out afterwards.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking --

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seeing the suspect on the Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found, alive. 50 people, 50 days. 50 nights. Just don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just a beautiful, caring, thoughtful, kind person, has a lot going for her, has always been someone to reach for the stars, and for the most part she`s always grabbed hold of them.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Twenty-four-year-old Jennifer Kesse was headed for a bright future. She had just purchased her first home, and she was in love. On January 24th, 2006, the bright light on her future dimmed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This whole thing has just been one hellish nightmare.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Kesse speaks to her boyfriend over the phone for the last time the night before she disappears. She tells him she`s going to bed. The next day, friends and family are concerned when the financial analyst does not answer calls or texts. That concern only turns to terror when Kesse fails to show up for a meeting at work.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every day would either call me just to say good morning, have a great day, or just text me to wish me to, you know, have a good day, love you, that type of thing. And when I didn`t receive it Tuesday morning, I thought it was odd.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My personal gut feeling is she got ready to go to work as normal and as soon as that condominium door closed, I don`t know what happened from that point. That`s where I think it started to happen.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Within just four hours, the young beauty is reported missing. For two days, there were no clues, until Kesse`s black Chevy Malibu was found about a mile away from her home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was abducted Tuesday. The car was found Thursday about a mile from her condominium complex in an area of town that honestly she would never go to. There was no sign of trauma in the vehicle whatsoever.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Grainy black-and-white surveillance video of what appears to be a man may be the best lead police have to find Jennifer Kesse.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It is our flesh and blood. We love her. Someone has taken her from us. And we want her back. Now.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls live. We`ll be straight back with Jennifer Kesse, but first, a 4-year-old little boy snatched literally out of his grandmother`s arms. A statewide amber alert issued from -- about the boy. Police dragging a canal. The witness may have seen suspect`s car go in. Now, surveillance video allegedly shows suspect buying beer just prior to the kidnap. Stacey Newman, what can you tell me about those circumstances?

STACEY NEWMAN, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, Nancy, new news right now about that vehicle that this witness believes they saw going into the canal. As we go to air right now, just minutes ago, we have learned it is not, repeat, not the car of Jose Rodriguez. Cops plan to go back onto the scene, Nancy, because there are fresh tire marks there. They believe it may be linked somehow to this case.

GRACE: All I can say is thank God. He`s angry with the mother. He keeps showing up trying to get the little boy from school, trying to get him every which way he can. He gets the little boy, snatching him away from his grandmother`s arms, and thank God he didn`t run his car into that canal with the boy to get back at the mother. What about it, Jean Casarez?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, IN SESSION: One very, very relevant fact here. And let`s review with everybody. Juliani is the name of the little boy. Juliani. And Jose Esteban Rodriguez is the name of the suspect in this case. And Julian is just a little boy. But the grandma saw him being taken by Jose Esteban Rodriguez, who is not the birth father, but the ex-boyfriend of the mother you`re seeing right there.

GRACE: What do you make of it, Pat Brown?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: The relationship he had with the little boy, he may not have been the biological father, but depending how long he was with the boy, maybe raising him from a baby, he may consider himself the father. So, it depends how much of an attachment he has. But if he`s just trying to get back at the mother, he`s angry at her --

GRACE: Pat, the family says he believes he is the father, but he`s not. He acts like he`s the father. He wants to be the father.

BROWN: Right.

GRACE: But he`s not the father.

BROWN: Well, he could be the father in the sense that -- you don`t have to be the biological father. If you raise that child from --

GRACE: The family is saying he`s not the father.

BROWN: Right. But I`m just looking at it from his point of view. I`m just saying what relationship he may think he has. But if he`s just trying to get back at the mother because he`s angry with her, that`s where the real danger comes in because then he`s just using that child as a pawn and has absolutely no empathy for the child at all. He just wants what he wants.

GRACE: You know, Marc Klaas, Pat Brown is right. When you get the anger factor, you could see a possible retaliation against the mother in the worst way, Marc.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, this guy is an absolute raving lunatic with a history of violence. I believe he`s got a manslaughter on his record. This is a perfect storm for an amber alert. You know who he is. You know what he`s driving. You know that he`s a very angry individual. So, hopefully, this amber alert will work, and people will be able to bring this kid home.

GRACE: OK, Liz, let me see that surveillance video at the convenience store. They got him buying beer just prior to the kidnap. He does have a criminal record, including a conviction for voluntary manslaughter. We also know the mother is pregnant with his baby. We are talking about Juliani Cardenas, ripped from his grandmother`s arms, abducted by the mother`s estranged boyfriend. This just happened yesterday, 4:12 p.m. Stacey Newman, what are cops doing?

NEWMAN: Like I said, they`re at the scene of that canal. They have issued this amber alert. They`re just following up on as many leads as they can to find this boy. And more importantly too with that surveillance video you`re seeing there on the screen, Nancy, the time stamp is literally about 20 minutes before this kidnapping. So, more danger for this boy. This man is probably drunk and has gotten behind the wheel with a 4-year- old little boy.

GRACE: The tip line, 209-552-2472. There is a reward in the case. Please look at this 4-year-old boy. He is completely helpless. From Patterson, California it`s about 17 miles southwest of Modesto. We`re looking for a silver Toyota Corolla, California plates, 6 H, happy, B, brother, W, white, 445. 6 HBW 445. Silver Toyota Corolla, oversized black rims, small spare tire may be on left rear.

This little boy`s life may depend on it. 209-552-2472. It`s been just over 24 hours. He was literally ripped from his grandmother`s arms. And now back to Jennifer Kesse. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Twenty-four-year-old financial planner, Jennifer Kesse, vanished from her Orlando home January 24th, 2006. Jennifer had just returned home from a long weekend in the Caribbean but was reported missing when she failed to show up for work the next day. Jennifer`s Chevy Malibu was found just two days later only a mile from her apartment complex.

After conducting an initial search, cops believe she was abducted and released surveillance video of a possible suspect dumping Jennifer`s car. The grainy video shows a suspect between 5`3" and 5`5" parked Jennifer`s car at a condominium complex and walk away.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: It is not beyond the realm of the possible for this case to be solved. To Andrew Scott, former chief of police, Boca Raton, now, president AJS consulting Miami, Florida. Andrew, there`ve been a lot of cases that have been solved when time has elapsed.

ANDREW J. SCOTT, FMR. CHIEF OF POLICE, BOCA RATON, FL: Oh, absolutely. There should be no diminishment of hope in this case just because nothing has been developed over the last 4 1/2 years. A show like this will obviously prompt people`s memories. But even more importantly, that photograph with the new technology could be accurately honed in and the focus changed where they might be able to get a legible picture out and then reproduce that picture to the public.

So, there`s many things that could be going on here including the fact that they`re opening up this case with other investigators and looking at it with fresh eyes. So, I think there is hope in this case.

GRACE: You know, you`re taking a look at this shot that he`s talking about. This was just outside the gate. Her car was found only a mile away. To Eleanor Odom, Doug Burns, and Daniel Horowitz. To you first, Doug Burns, when time passes, will that be held against a suspect or defendant when they finally are found?

DOUG BURNS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, yes, that`s very possible. The thing that strikes me here, it`s interesting, the father said about the illegal workers. Obviously, you don`t want to paint with a broad brush, but the problem is there isn`t a lot of employment paperwork, and that`s a very difficult obstacle.

GRACE: What about it, Daniel Horowitz? As time has passed, is that an aggravating factor to a defendant that may have grabbed her, that he let so much time pass and the family suffer?

DANIEL HOROWITZ, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Of course. Of course. I mean, people may furious with this person. But I think most importantly here, we have to relook at the facts in terms of who was there, talk to the people. Were people drug addicted in the past and now they`ve cleaned up? Let`s go to the jails around there, the prisons. I think this is a drug-related crime, and I don`t think it`s related to those workers at all.

GRACE: Eleanor Odom.

ELEANOR ODOM, ATTORNEY: You know, cold cases are very sympathetic to juries. Juries are very sympathetic to this, and I think they would find anybody who`s found to be the defendant in this case guilty.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Someone knows something. We`re still looking for Jennifer. All right? Not only this person ought to help us out, but we`re still looking for Jennifer. That`s the main thing here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Orlando police continue to investigate the disappearance of 24-year-old Jennifer Kesse, who authorities believe was abducted from her apartment complex in January 2006.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What we do know is somebody probably knows the person involved or people involved in this case. They just haven`t come forward.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators say Jennifer had a conversation with her boyfriend around 10:00 p.m., January 23rd. When Jennifer failed to show up for work the next day, she was reported missing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Whoever has her, do the right thing, as we`ve been saying all the time, and just let her go and be off.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her car found abandoned at an apartment complex just a mile from her own home, but no signs of a struggle in the car.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The longer something goes on, it`s certainly always going to be concerning to the family, and it`s always going to be concerning to us, but, you know, we`re going to always hope and keep our fingers crossed that we can move quickly with what information we get and try to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators hoping for a tip from the public, release grainy surveillance video of a suspect dumping Jennifer`s car the day she was reported missing. Investigators have looked through more than 1,000 leads but have made no arrests. Where is Jennifer Kesse?

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. And joining us tonight, Jennifer`s parents, Drew and Joyce Kesse. Out to the lines, Martha in Mississippi. Hi, Martha.

MARTHA, MISSISSIPPI: Hi, Nancy.

GRACE: Hi, dear. What`s your question?

MARTHA: Well, first of all, you know why I`m so proud of you? Because you realize what the man on Monday quoted, and justice to some is a threat to justice for all by Dr. King. And he meant all. And thank you, Nancy, for honoring Jesus Christ every day, in what you do, in spite of what the critic, who need to stay off your Facebook page has to say.

OK. Now, my question is do the police or FBI show the profile of the young man in the picture to all the immigrants that were there at the time, and if not, can they go back and do so or even go to Mexico and show the picture? Because I really think it needs to be shown in Mexico.

GRACE: You know, that`s an excellent idea. What do we know about that, Drew Kesse?

DREW KESSE, FATHER: As far as going back, as I stated earlier, the next day, probably 3/4 of the work crew was gone. They`d already decided they were taking off to other parts. As far as Mexico is concerned, Mexico does have information about Jennifer. The consulate down there was contacted early in the investigation. And personally, myself, approximately about a year ago, I sat down one Sunday morning and wrote every single consulate that was available at the U.N., both at the U.N. offices as well as their country offices.

So, we have heard from over 60 countries concerning Jennifer. And I would like to say also the photograph that we have of the person who dropped Jennifer`s car off, that was enhanced by NASA as well as Wal-Mart and Target. That is the best we`re going to get. They put cameras up at Jennifer`s place two weeks after she was taken. But the real crux of the situation with Jennifer, and especially, being an adult, Nancy, is first responders.

Our first response from a police officer was she probably had a fight with her boyfriend, she`ll be back, and walked out. And that`s what started it all because she was an adult. We have to rely on our first responders. There`s no room for mistakes when it comes to missing and abducted people. There is no room. Please make that, you know, really clear. And we have been told by Orlando police in meetings as well as with FBI that missteps were made by Orlando police in the first week, and those missteps will never be able to get back.

So, we have to go forward with what we have and don`t have. And it is the first responder in the training. Orlando police had no protocol. They had no policies and procedures to follow at the time. They do now, I think. And it is just incredible that we have gone out and educated ourselves. We know how to find missing people now.

Yet, Orlando Police Department has yet to send any of their officers for training. Our lead detective has not had one class in training of missing people. I`ve been trained by Fox Valley Technical College, which is the leading continuing education technical college for police in the land. And I`m 3/4 of the way through the courses.

GRACE: Even after the Kesse case, that nothing has been done. When you say there`s a lot that they don`t have because they didn`t get it immediately, things like what?

DREW KESSE: Well, I don`t want to go into all of it. It`s not really the time or place --

GRACE: Well, don`t. Don`t. Don`t. If you think it`s going to compromise the investigation, don`t even bring it up.

DREW KESSE: No, the investigation is over. If someone was to call the Orlando Police Department right now, they would not take the lead. They would ask you to call the FBI. The FBI will tell you that they are only reviewing Jennifer`s case and that you should call Orlando Police Department. That is the catch-22 that Jennifer is in right now. Not us. We`re not the hurt ones. You can`t hurt us anymore. It is Jennifer. And --

GRACE: So neither Orlando Police nor the FBI are taking tips?

DREW KESSE: No.

JOYCE KESSE, MOTHER: No. And they won`t make the case --

DREW KESSE: And they asked right to our face, no, do not send any more tips. She is gone. She has vanished. We do not have a clue of where she is. It`s over.

JOYCE KESSE: But they won`t make her case cold, which is very interesting unto itself.

DREW KESSE: They don`t have to share the case if the case is left open and active. Which --

GRACE: Are you talking about the Orlando PD?

JOYCE KESSE: Correct.

DREW KESSE: It is Orlando Police`s case. It has never been the FBI`s case.

GRACE: But they`re not even taking tips?

JOYCE KESSE: No.

DREW KESSE: The FBI has not even looked at the tape of Jennifer`s car being dropped off. Quote unquote --

GRACE: What about it Marc Klaas? What do you make of that?

KLAAS: Well, I make many things of that. Obviously, they`re on their own here. There`s no law enforcement behind them. So, they have to devise strategies to get the media and the public behind them. But as far as this business of training law enforcement on missing persons, you know, there are 25,000 law enforcement agencies in the United States, and in order for all of them to go to Fox Valley Training, it will probably take 100 years.

What I think needs to be done is they need to take the mountain to Mohammed or they need to take Mohammed to the mountain. They need to take the training to the agencies, to the states, and you could then train all of those agencies in a very short amount of time, in probably, just a couple of years. They shouldn`t be sitting on their pedestal waiting for the cops to come to them. They should be going to the cops and doing it that way.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Their families left behind, wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The police reaction basically was he`s 17, and boys will do this, and he`ll come home. I put up all these posters. I walked blocks and blocks and blocks putting up all these posters. And the next day, they were all gone. He said he was going to a friend for a little while, and he probably would be back around 10:00. He didn`t take anything with him like he normally would. And he loved to act. He was in plays at school. He was very handsome. So, you know, that helped.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He was cute.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think that he made a mistake. I think he misjudged the people that he was going to go visit with.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He really was going to come home that night.

GRACE: Out to the lines. Theda in Missouri. Hi, Theda.

THEDA, MISSOURI: My son, Christian Taylor Ferguson missing from St. Louis, Missouri.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nine-year-old Christian Taylor Ferguson was with his father the morning of June 11th, 2003 when his father pulled the car over to make a quick phone call at a pay phone.

GRACE: Unless the cops get enough information at the get-go --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But when he stepped out of the car for just a moment, someone suddenly stole the car with Christian still in the back seat.

GRACE: They don`t have enough, they can`t make an arrest. They can`t make him, now that he`s a target, they can`t make him come in and talk to them.

THEDA: Well, let me tell you about my case. They have enough evidence. There`s a 33-page police report. You know, I just really can`t believe that I`m in this position of looking for my son and trying to bring some normalcy to my entire family`s life.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The SUV was found abandoned a few hours later, about five miles from where it was taken. Police and tracker dogs searched the area, but there was no sign of Christian.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There is a common thread here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The family says Christian had a medical condition and would not have been able to get out of the car without assistance.

KLAAS: It extends to Christian. It extends to Hasanni. It extends to Zahra Baker. Did you know that the maltreatment of children with disabilities is 1.5 to 10 times higher than the maltreatment of children without disabilities, and that immediate family members perpetrate the majority of neglect, physical abuse and emotional abuse against these children?

THEDA: I remember Christian being very vibrant. He was so beautiful to me. And his skin was so soft. And he -- if you looked at him, you wanted to just grab him and pick him up and just hold him.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9:00 sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END





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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Fri Jan 21, 2011 10:11 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Bradle10

January 19, 2011
Tionda & Diamond Bradley: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 11:46 PM ET

In 2001 their disappearance sparked the largest manhunt search in Chicago’s history. 100 detectives assigned to the case and more than 50000 abandoned buildings searched all in an effort to find Diamond and Tionda Bradley.

Who can forget the faces of the two little girls, ages three and ten, who were last seen at a neighborhood playground. The girls left a note behind telling their mother where they would be. That note would set the scene for police pointing them in the direction they needed to go first. This is a case that still haunts Chicago police. They haven’t given up hope. Despite national media coverage the tip needed to bring these sisters home still has not come.

TIPLINE: 1-800-THE-LOST

Tionda Bradley
Missing Since: July 6, 2001
Missing From: Chicago, IL
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 10
Height at Disappearance: 4’2”
Weight at Disappearance: 70 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black
Scars: Quarter sized scar on left forearm
Clothing:
-Long sleeve hooded shirt (light bluish/gray)
-Jeans w/ knees cut out
-Black slip on American Eagle shoes w/ white rubber soles, no socks
-Bathing suit under clothes

Diamond Bradley
Missing Since: July 6, 2001
Missing From: Chicago, IL
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 3
Height at Disappearance: 3 feet
Weight at Disappearance: 35 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Black
Scars: Scar on left side of head at hairline





Two Sisters Disappeared Six Years Ago

Aired January 20, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on "Nancy Grace."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There is a god.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m just wishing my kids, whoever has my kids, please get them home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The disappearance of sisters, age three and 10, sparked one of the largest searches in Chicago`s history. Diamond and Tionda Bradley allegedly left a note for their mom on July 6th, 2001.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: These are two beautiful young girls, and it`s heartbreaking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Tracy Bradley left for work that day at 6:00 a.m. When she returned home at 12:30, she unknowingly read the first piece of evidence police would use to find her daughters.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A note was there saying that "Me and Diamond went to the store." And from there, I mean, I didn`t hear anything else.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Despite a massive search, the girls were never found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We feel like, will they ever be found? Is everybody doing the most that they can to find them?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s been glimmers of hope in the search for Tionda and Diamond Bradley -- a mystery note, a cell phone message about a man named George. Then a web photo six years into the search of what family believes is a grown-up Tionda. But that hope all ends in frustration.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We pray that you continue to search for them.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nearly 500 Chicago police and a dozen FBI agents worked the case, searching with dogs, combing through thick forest preserves, dragging lakes. The community passed out fliers, held vigils.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A thousand interviews have been made, 5,000 abandoned buildings searched, and national media attention.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re live here on Chicago`s south side. Joining in the search for two little girls, missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: None of it has led to the one clue that could bring the sisters home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Bring my children back home because I miss them and love them dearly. Here`s a sketch of them today that, you know, you see these two girls out there, Diamond and Tionda, call, get in touch with FBI.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping but never forgetting, and neither have we. So 50 people, 50 days -- for 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, to Chicago. Summertime. Mommy goes to work as usual, but when she comes home, her apartment is empty. Her two little girls ages just three and 10, gone. The only clue, a mystery note allegedly written by the 10-year-old saying they headed to a nearby playground. The sisters are never seen or heard from again.

But hope not lost. Sightings still reported. The family even believes they see Tionda on a social networking website. What happened to two beautiful little sisters, Diamond and Tionda Bradley?

But first, we`re going to go straight out with an incredible story to Jean Casarez. A little 19-year-old baby (ph) kidnapped. What happened, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Missing for 23 years, Nancy and found, found just days ago. It was back in 1987 here in New York that joy white and the father of her child took their little Carlina to a hospital in New York City because she had a 104 degree temperature. She was only three weeks old. They hooked her up to intravenous feeding. They told the parents, you can go home for a while. When they came back, the baby was gone. It had been kidnapped.

It is believed by a woman parading to be a nurse at the hospital. And for 23 years Joy White has missed her daughter. The daughter believing something wasn`t right contacted the center for missing and exploited children. They helped her put it all together. DNA has confirmed that she has found her mother in New York, Joy White.

GRACE: You know, Jean, I can hardly take it in. Let`s go out to Ernie Ellen, our friend, the president from the National Center of Missing and Exploited Children joining us out of D.C. Ernie, this is, you know, a very, very rare occasion and a moment to stop and thank god for what has happened. You don`t see this that often, Ernie. What happened, Ernie? How did she know something was wrong?

ERNIE ELLEN, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN (via telephone): Well, Nancy, there were a series of things over a period of time. She -- some very basic things. She said she didn`t look like the other members of her family. There were some things that her mother was not able to do. She wanted to drive and her mother hadn`t gotten a Social Security number for her.

Things built up and it came to a point where this is a very smart, tenacious young woman. She went to our Web site and started looking at pictures of long term missing children. She called us on December 22nd, called our hotline and said something is not right in my life. I think I`m not who I`m supposed to be.

Our case workers did a lengthy interview, gathered lots of facts and details and began to compare them, physical characteristics, began to compare them with some of these long-term missing child cases. Ultimately working with the New York police department we zeroed in on Carlina white.

And two NYPD detectives went to Georgia to interview her, took DNA samples. And a few days ago the DNA came back that this little three-week- old baby who was abducted from the hospital in New York in 1987 is this remarkable 23-year-old woman. She`s met her family. She`s been reunited with her family. It`s a miracle, Nancy. And what you`re doing is going to generate even more miracles.

GRACE: Take a look at this. And take a look at what the mom said back in 1987.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She had something set up. For a person to put on a nurse suit, to wander in the hospital and go in that hospital anyway, you knew what you were doing. Why would you be in Connecticut having a baby when you wasn`t coming from Connecticut? No one`s around you. You`re not asking your sisters, come with me to the hospital, I`m about to have my baby. Is no one around you while you have this baby? So, where did you get me from?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Let`s get that sound from `87, Kiz. In the meantime, to Marc Klaas. Weigh in, Marc.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER, KLASSKIDS FOUNDATION: This is the ultimate fair fairytale ending and I share their show. Nobody was harmed, nobody was murdered. Nobody was raped. The little girl and her mother are reunited and hopefully the end will continue to be happy.

GRACE: To Pat Brown, criminal profiler. What kind of person goes into a hospital, pretends to be a nurse and takes a baby?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Time and time again, Nancy, you have a woman who has a psychopathic personality and she wants what she wants. She wants the attention she`s going to get by having a child in her life. Being able to show that child off and thinks I should go in and get one.

It`s interesting sometimes the family members say, wait a minute -- that`s when you get the baby back, they`re the ones who say, she`s been lying all of her life, she plays these manipulative games and will turn her in or say that`s who it is.

But there are other family members who women actually look the other way when the woman shows up with a baby that`s clearly probably not hers and simply say, we didn`t know. But we have a person here who wants the attention by having the child in her life. She doesn`t care and love the child but wants it like a toy. That`s what this woman apparently did.

GRACE: Liz, let`s hear the sound.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I hope she`s taking good care of my baby.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: An incredible, incredible discovery, 23 years later a child stolen, kidnapped from the hospital bed is reunited with her mother.

Right now to another story, a story out of Chicago. Two little girls, her mom goes to -- their mom goes to work that day as usual. She comes home to an empty apartment. I want to go out to Jean Casarez. What happened, Jean?

CASAREZ: Because in this particular instance, two little girls were abducted. And law enforcement say that`s very unusual and could signify that they are still alive, because it is so rare.

But Tionda and her sister Diamond Bradley actually were in the house that morning, and this was a summer morning in 2001. Their mother went to work and they left a note, the older girl wrote a note and left it on a sofa.

And when her mother got home from work it said, we went to a store then we were going to go to the Doolittle school. Well, she had never written a note before to her mother. It was highly unusual.

But FBI analysts determined it was her handwriting. But the question always has been, what about this cell phone call saying George is at the door and he wants permission to take us to go get a cake because there were several Georges in their life, one being George Washington, the father of little Diamond.

GRACE: Joining me tonight, James Miller, this is a private detective. He has worked on this case from the very beginning. He`s joining us from Woodridge, Illinois. Hi, James, what can you tell us?

JAMES MILLER, PRIVATE DETECTIVE: Hi, Nancy. All I can tell you is we worked this case very, very hard and very efficiently to the best that we could. We ripped the city apart. We`ve gone into abandoned buildings, into sewer systems, on the lake. We`ve had psychics come in who sent us to Wolf Lake. We`ve had dogs out there.

But what I could also tell you is that we do constantly get leads and we follow up on every lead. We had one recent lead about a couple years ago where a federal investigator was in a bar and he saw a Tionda lookalike. This girl was also talking to somebody and said she was from Chicago.

So he just saw "America`s Most Wanted" and he did see the age- progressed photos of Tionda. And then when he went to question the girl about being from Chicago, some lady went and grabbed her, took her out of the bar, and drove her off.

We called the FBI. We called -- we sent an investigator out there. And we investigated the bar. We found out that it was part of a known prostitution sex ring. And however, we were not able to get any more information on that case.

So all I can tell you is we are constantly searching. We are constantly looking into leads. The Chicago police is working very deeply on a couple of other suspects in the case. We`re re-interviewing witnesses. There are some activity -- there is some activity going on that would jeopardize the case a little bit that we cannot really discuss on the line, but we are working this very hard and following up on everything.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: When you go through something like this, especially when kids come up missing, we feel the same things. You know, we feel like, you know, will they ever be found? Is everybody doing the most that they can to find them?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ten-year-old Tionda and her three-year-old sister, Diamond, left their south side Chicago home July 6th, 2001, leaving a note for their mother saying they were going to the school playground nearby. Nobody has seen the Bradley sisters since, and their family is desperate for answers.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s been really, really hard for the family.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Is everybody doing the most that they can to find them?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mom, Tracy Bradley, said when she returned home from work there was no sign of her two little girls, except the handwritten note by Tionda confirmed by police to be her handwriting.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We pray that you continue to search for them.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police searched nearby neighborhood parks, abandoned buildings and conducted more than 1,000 interviews but have found no sign of the Bradley sisters.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s been glimmers of hope in the search for Tionda and Diamond Bradley. A mystery note, a cell phone message about a man named George, then a web photo six years into the search of what family believes is a grown-up Tionda. But that hope all ends in frustration and investigators are no closer to finding the Bradley sisters.

Just 10 and three years old when they vanished in 2001, their mother reports coming home from work to find her little girls gone. A note was left behind in Tionda`s handwriting, placing them at a nearby school, but no one has seen them since. Last sighting, 6:00 a.m. the morning mommy goes to work, the last time she would see her little girls.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Right now, a very special guest is joining us out of Lexington, North Carolina, Sheliah Bradley-Smith. This is the aunt, the aunt of Tionda and Diamond Bradley. Miss Sheliah, thank you for being with us.

SHELIAH BRADLEY-SMITH, GREAT-AUNT OF MISSING SISTERS TIONDA AND DIAMOND: Thank you for having us, again, Nancy, on your show.

GRACE: Please don`t thank me. It is my honor. It`s really my privilege to get to profile these two beautiful girls. You know, my little girl is three right now, and I cannot even imagine going home tonight and somebody telling me, well, they`re just gone. They`re gone. Tell me what you believe happened, Sheliah.

BRADLEY-SMITH: Nancy, I believe that someone that was a close acquaintance with the mother of Tionda and Diamond took those children.

GRACE: Why do you say that?

BRADLEY-SMITH: Well, because the note. That was not the way Tionda spoke, the grammar, the sentence structure. Even though it was her fingerprinting and handwriting, she was coached to write that note. There was a voice message left that several of our family members listened to. It was dated for that date, and it said that George was at the door.

GRACE: It said George was at the door. Who`s George?

BRADLEY-SMITH: George Washington is Diamond`s father. And there`s another George that was an acquaintance with Tracy, which was George Senore, who used to baby sit the kids, and he`s a close family friend.

GRACE: Well, why would there be a voicemail from the girls saying George was at the door?

BRADLEY-SMITH: That`s exactly my point, Nancy.

GRACE: OK. A voicemail to who?

BRADLEY-SMITH: The voice message was to her mom`s cell phone.

GRACE: And all it said is George is at the door?

BRADLEY-SMITH: No. "It said, ma, this is Tionda, pick up the phone, ma. George is at the door, he says we`re coming to pick you up from work and we`re going to jewel`s to get the cake."

GRACE: What cake?

BRADLEY-SMITH: Well, one of the other siblings, her birthday was the day after, that the children were allegedly missing. So I could only believe that they were talking about the cake of the sibling, because it was her birthday.

GRACE: Had they planned to go get a cake?

BRADLEY-SMITH: To my knowledge, no, but when I questioned even their mom regarding the voice message and other family members questioned her about it, she did indicate that that was a message that was left almost a month prior for her birthday.

However, I don`t believe that because, one, the message was dated, and two, her mom would not have been picking up an explicitly made cake for Vicki`s birthday.

GRACE: Were the Georges in their lives checked out and located?

BRADLEY-SMITH: According to the investigators, yes.

GRACE: What do you believe, Sheliah?

BRADLEY-SMITH: It hasn`t been done thoroughly.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police need your help in bringing home sisters Diamond and Tionda Bradley. The girls go missing after supposedly leaving a note for their mom.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: On July 6th, 2001, the girls left their mother, Tracy, a note and said they were going to play at this school. They haven`t been seen since.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And even though the disappearance has been turned over to cold case detectives, Chicago police have never lost hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My message to the individual or individuals that have these children is this is now the time to bring them back home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: The tip line is 312-746-9690. There is a $30,000 reward. Hey, you listening, $30,000 to help us find out what happened to these two little girls. The tip line, 312-746-9690.

Marc Klaas, very unusual, to me -- you`re the expert -- for two girls to be taken at once?

KLAAS: It is very unusual, and I think there`s a couple of scenarios, a couple of things that present themselves and that can be learned from here.

Number one, there is a very small set of perverts out there who would enjoy the company of children this age. So they very well could have been trafficked out.

Secondly, I think it`s instructive that this case has gone on for so long, yet it`s not a cold case, and even the fact that there are private investigators involved in the case I think is a real sign for hope. And I hope that people who have long-term missing would learn from that. I know everybody can`t afford it, but in a case like this where there`s a $30,000 reward, perhaps if a PI were able to crack the case they would not take that reward.

However, not any PI will do. Find an individual or firm that has experience searching for missing children and hopefully a law enforcement background so they can use the resources in law enforcement without having the restraints as law enforcement has as they are independent operators and independent contractors.

GRACE: What about it, Pat Brown?

BROWN: I think in this case the PI is going all over the place chasing down a bunch of scenarios that are ridiculous. I think Miss Sheliah is exactly right, right on the money. She believes this is not a stranger abduction. I believe it`s not a stranger abduction. I believe that go right back to those Georges. My guess is George Washington, the father of Diamond. They ought to be looking there at him.

And they also ought to be looking in Indiana where they supposedly were going camping. Why would that state come up into somebody`s mind if they never camped before? Indiana. Look over there. And they`re not going to be alive.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you, all. I`m just wishing my kids, whoever got my kids, please get them home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days. 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m just wishing my kids, whoever got my kids, please, get them home.

GRACE (voice-over): The disappearance of sisters, age 3 and 10 sparked one of the largest searches in Chicago`s history. Diamond and Tionda Bradley allegedly left a note for their mom on July 6th, 2001.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Two beautiful young girls, and it`s heartbreaking.

GRACE: Tracy Bradley left for work that day at 6:00 a.m. When she returned home at 12:30, she unknowingly read the first piece of evidence police would use to find her daughters.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A note was there saying that me and Diamond went to the store and from there, I mean, they didn`t hear anything else.

GRACE: Despite a massive search, the girls were never found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We feel like, will they ever be found? Is everybody doing the most that they can to find them?

GRACE: There`s been glimmer of hope in the search for Tionda and Diamond Bradley. A mystery note. A cell phone message by the man named George (ph), then a web photo six years into the search of what family believe is a grown-up Tionda, but that hope all ends in frustration.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We pray that you continue to search for them.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nearly 500 Chicago police and a dozen FBI agents worked the case, searching with dogs, combing through thick forest preserves, dragging lakes. The community passed out fliers, held vigils.

GRACE: A thousand interviews have been made, 5,000 abandoned buildings searched, and national media attention.

GRACE (on-camera): We are live here on Chicago`s south side, joining in the search for two little girls missing.

GRACE (voice-over): But none of it has led to the one clue that can bring the sisters home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Bring my children back home because I miss them and I love them dearly. Here`s a sketch of them today that, you know, you see these two girls out there, Diamond and Tionda, call, get in touch with FBI.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): We are taking your calls. I want to remind everyone, there is no official suspect named. Out to the lines. Sheila, New York. Hi, Sheila.

SHEILA, NEW YORK: Hi, Nancy. Well, I tell you, you got God`s calling.

GRACE: Bless you. Thank you.

SHEILA: You`re welcome. And I can`t believe how big your little ones are already.

GRACE: You know, John David is 3. He`s right up to here. He`s up to one of my top ribs.

SHEILA: Wow.

GRACE: That`s how tall he is. And Lucy`s right behind him. Can you believe it? And she was just two pounds when she was born.

SHEILA: I saw them in the snow on TV. And -- I just in awe. I couldn`t believe they got that big.

GRACE: I can`t either.

SHEILA: I was wondering, were those children left home alone while she worked?

GRACE: Good question. To Sheliah Bradley-Smith, were they alone while mom went to work?

SHELIAH BRADLEY-SMITH, GREAT AUNT OF MISSING SISTERS: From my understanding is that Tionda and Diamond were left alone in the apartment as George and Tracy left that morning.

GRACE: How long was she at work?

BRADLEY-SMITH: I believe three to four hours.

GRACE: And in that space of time, gone. To Paul Penzone, former sergeant Phoenix PD, child advocate. Do you believe suspicion was ever placed on the mom?

PAUL PENZONE, FORMER SERGEANT PHOENIX PD; CHILD ADVOCATE: Oh, I`m sure it had been early on because everyone close to the children are --

GRACE: I don`t really see that, though.

PENZONE: I`m just saying from a perspective of the investigators, but I will tell you this. The facts are just not sitting well with me. I think there`s too much information there. As the family member stated earlier, go back to the beginning and start from scratch with this investigation. If you have not completely identified the Georges and gone down that road, you need to.

And the $30,000 you spoke of, I have a long history in crime stoppers, and money is a very powerful motivator. But at the end of the day, there`s somebody out there with this weight on their heart because they know where these children are, and they need to be back with their mother. If it`s the money that inspires you, then make the call, but please make the call because, morally, these children need to be home.

And we`ve seen cases, it`s years later, but miracle happens. Just like the story you spoke of earlier on the show, and I saw one here in Phoenix similar to that. We need to hope for that miracle because it can and it should happen.

GRACE: To Kathy Chaney, web editor, "Chicago Defender," joining us out of Chicago. Kathy, it`s great to talk to you again. Kathy, who had seen these children last other than the mother?

KATHY CHANEY, WEB EDITOR, "CHICAGO DEFENDER": Well, that`s where it becomes sketchy, because it`s that they`re saying that some kids say they saw the kids outside playing, then, the mom said she saw them last when she went to work. So, it`s kind of sketchy to pin down who really saw the kids. And then, I have to mention that there was critical search time that lapsed because there was several hours when the family did a private search before the police was actually called to join in the search.

The police was called around 6:00 that evening. So, you have several hours that was critical search time that was not utilized.

GRACE: Kathy, go through the timeline, as you know it. With us, Kathy Chaney, web editor "Chicago Defender." Go ahead, Kathy.

CHANEY: From our understanding from accounts, Tracy Bradley, the mom, she left for work around 6:00 or 6:30. I believe her shift was, like, maybe 7:00 to 12:00. She left work. The girls were asleep. She comes home. The girls are not there. Then, she calls family and friends. They go searching for the girls. Couldn`t find the girls, so then, the police was called, like I said, several hours later, and then, that`s when the massive search started by the Chicago Police Department.

FBI got involved. And I know that Tracy, initially, told the police that she was at home sleeping until about 11:00 that morning and then she woke up and the girls were gone. She was scared to say that she left the girls home alone to go to work. So, I know that there were some inconsistencies, but you know, she fessed up to it. But after that, it`s pretty much the lost search time. And then, I have to mention also that the family had moved away shortly after the girls were missing.

So, I know there was some concerns from some community leaders that if the girls had tried to call home, you know, to find out something, they would hit a brick wall because the family didn`t live there anymore. It`s just -- it`s really sad. And today is Tionda`s 20th birthday.

GRACE: Yes. That`s why we timed tonight`s program specifically for that. Everybody, stay put.

Very quickly, we`re going to come back to the two missing little girls out of Chicago, but right now a 4-year-old little California boy literally ripped from his grandmother`s arms, snatched broad daylight. Juliani. For the latest, Jean Casarez. Jean Casarez, give me a timeline. What happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, IN SESSION: Well, this little boy, Juliani was with his grandmother, was with his mother, also, and the ex- boyfriend came and had tried to do this before and snatched the little boy, and the grandmother witnessed it. So, it`s not a who done it. It is here is this little boy? And that was the last time that he was seen.

GRACE: And Ellie, what is this business about a car going into the water?

ELLIE JOSTAD, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right. Well, yesterday, a tipster came forward and said that Tuesday night about 5 o`clock, just about 45 minutes after Juliani was abducted, he said that he saw a car matching the description of the suspect`s car, Jose Rodriguez`s car. He said that he saw a man and boy inside. He saw the car go into the canal. Passed today, investigators have been dragging that canal. They found some stolen cars, but they did not find the suspect`s car.

GRACE: With us, Juliani`s mother, Tabitha Cardenas. Tabitha -- she`s along with Sheriff Adam Christianson of Stanislaus County Sheriff`s. Tabitha, do you really believe that your ex would hurt the boy?

VOICE OF TABITHA CARDENAS, MOTHER OF ABDUCTED 4-YEAR-OLD: No, I don`t. He loves -- he really loves Juliani. I don`t think he would hurt him. He`s just not in his right state of mind.

GRACE: What do you think he`s doing?

CARDENAS: I don`t know. I think he`s probably hiding with a friend of his or something.

GRACE: What do you think, Sheriff Christianson?

VOICE OF SHERIFF ADAM CHRISTIANSON, STANISLAUS COUNTY SHERIFF`S: Indications are based upon the information that we have, that, you know, while we`re still hopeful that we`ll find Juliani alive, we`re not confident that, you know, that Jose Rodriguez hasn`t driven this car into the canal. So, we`re going to continue our search efforts. We`ve solicited the help of the Merced County Sheriff`s Department.

We`re going to use side scanning sonar tomorrow in an effort to continue to search that canal. That all of the witness` statements as well as the evidence at the scene corroborate this. And I can only hope that we don`t find that car and that we continue --

GRACE: But wouldn`t you know by now, sheriff? I mean, you`ve been down there diving. Wouldn`t you know by now whether the car is in the canal?

CHRISTIANSON: Well, unfortunately, in this particular part of the canal, Nancy, there are places that divers can`t go or they risk losing their lives. So, that`s why we`re bringing in additional equipment to search those areas. And we`re going to continue to search until we know for certain that the car is not there. In the meantime, we want all of your viewers and everybody else to keep looking for Jose Rodriguez, the vehicle he`s driving, and Juliani.

GRACE: A silver Toyota Corolla. License plate 6 HBW 445. Tip line, 209-552-2472. $1,000 reward. We will be covering this tomorrow night.

And please, help us find missing woman, Shelaya Gonzalez, 21, vanishes July 16th, 2005, Brooklyn, 118 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. A beauty. Tattoo on upper thigh says drip. If you have info, call 800-577-8477. And if you have a loved one missing, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE (voice-over): Diamond was 3 and Tionda was 10 when the girls disappeared from the south side neighborhood without a trace. Their mother, Tracy Bradley, last saw the girls at 6:30 on the morning of July 6th, 2001.

TRACY BRADLEY, MOTHER: I unlocked my door, and I called for Tionda and Diamond. So, I didn`t get no response back.

GRACE: Their mother comes home from work to find a note the little girls were going to a nearby playground. That playground, just one block away from their home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Despite a massive search, the girls were never found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Any information that`s come in, we`ve followed through on. We have people looking at. And at this point, we`re still looking for two missing girls.

BRADLEY: If anybody knows anything out there and here`s a sketch of them today that, you know, you see these two girls out there, Diamond and Tionda, call, get in touch with FBI.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE (on-camera): Unleash the lawyers. Eleanor Odom, Peter Odom, Renee Rockwell. Eleanor Odom, right now, no suspects that they`re telling us about. Where do cops go?

ELEANOR ODOM, FELONY PROSECUTOR: Well, I think, Nancy, we`ve said before, you got to start at the very beginning. Look at these two Georges. Ask them to take polygraphs. See what they say. You can`t force them to, but that should give you some information if they`re willing to take polygraph, including the mom as well.

GRACE: And to you, Renee Rockwell, what sticks out most to you about this case?

RENEE ROCKWELL, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Nancy, let me tell you what bothers me. I`m a little unsettled about why the mother tried to deny that this message came maybe a month earlier instead at the very time. Another thing, Nancy, just because the girls said hey, George is at the door, doesn`t necessarily mean that it was George at the door.

Somebody may have presented themselves as George, but the fact that the child wrote something down, we, at least, know that the child was comfortable enough to sit down and write a note, being coached, was comfortable enough with the person that was in the room with them. So, I think it is someone that knows them.

GRACE: I don`t know if you have to be comfortable with somebody to be forced to write a note. What about it, peter Odom?

PETER ODOM, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Right. The kid might have done it under duress or under threat. Unlike some of the other people on the show, Nancy, I`m, frankly, comforted that there`s a private investigator involved in the case and that reward is out there, and here`s why. As the case ages, as it becomes colder and colder, the police departments, the public police departments are less and less willing to put resources into it. That`s where a private investigator can really help to stir things up and to put a pair of fresh eyes on a case and do what Paul Penzone suggests. Start from the beginning.

GRACE: Also, also, Peter, I`m encouraged by the fact that there`s no body. No bodies have been found. Now, if these were a random kidnap and murder, the bodies would not have been hidden. They would have been dumped somewhere in a landfill --

PETER ODOM: One would think. One would think.

GRACE: A trash dump. Yes. And why is that, Pat Brown? It`s normally the ones that know you who go to these great efforts to hide the body.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: When you have -- these girls just walked out the door and somebody grabbed them, they probably would have been dead within the hour like we usually see with abducted children, and the guy just tosses them because he doesn`t have a link back to those children. He`s not worried about police coming knocking on his door. But if you are, you know, related to those children in some way, and this certainly looks like that in this particular case, I don`t believe those girls ever left that place on their own accord.

Then, you don`t want the police knocking. So, you want to make sure those bodies go far, far away, you want to go, perhaps, to a camping site somewhere in the woods, dig a large hole and put them in it, sadly enough, and make sure they`re never discovered. And then, you go back home and say, well, you can`t prove it because you can`t find any bodies. I think the police definitely have to go back to the beginning on this.

As far as a P.I. goes, I love a P.I. in a case, but if he`s going after bunch of leads that are not based on the evidence, that concerns me.

GRACE: To Kathy Chaney, explain to me what the mother was saying about that message?

CHANEY: That, you know, George was there. We`re going to the store. We`re going to come pick you up, and that`s what was left.

GRACE: She was saying it was from another time?

CHANEY: Originally, yes, but then, it was, like, it was -- her two days later, so that`s hard to pinpoint of when the message was actually left, when it was actually heard. Sheliah can probably speak a little bit more to that since they heard it, but it`s just hard to pin down some of those details.

GRACE: OK. What about it, Sheliah? Explain that again.

BRADLEY-SMITH: Nancy, as I stated earlier, several family members heard the voice message. Tracy did not hear the message. One of Tracy`s sisters went into Tracy`s cell phone and she played the recorded message that indicated that George was at the door.

GRACE: And so, there was just confusion about when the message had been left?

BRADLEY-SMITH: Well, I`m not confused about it because as I stated earlier, Tracy`s birthday, she usually has her birthday party at a lounge. That lounge usually supplies a sexually explicit birthday cake. They will not sell that in your local Dominic`s or your local Jewel`s. So, that`s how I know that message was geared towards picking up the cake for one of the siblings` birthday.

GRACE: Weigh in, Bethany Marshall.

BETHANY MARSHALL, PSYCHOANALYST, AUTHOR OF "DEALBREAKERS": Whoever did this had intimate knowledge of the family because they knew that there was a George, that there was a school nearby. They knew the mother`s work schedule. And in terms of whether, why the children have not been found, it speaks to the premeditation of this crime. Unlike the body that`s dumped in the alley or in a garbage can, when the perpetrator thinks about committing a crime for a long, long time, then, they prepare a dump site for the body.

And we think of these types of crimes with sexually motivated perps, as being a guy in a dark alley in a trench coat, but let`s remember that most crimes occur in the context of attachment systems. Meaning, maybe a guy that was mad at the mom so took two little girls as a form of revenge against the mother or who had an obsessional fixation on these little girls, so he wanted control over them or motivated by greed, and so, he took the little girls in order to sell them to some freaks as Marc Klaas suggested. So, it`s the attachment system that may have motivated the crime.

GRACE: Everyone, tonight, authorities are hoping advanced technology can help in the search for missing Massachusetts boy, Giovani Gonzalez, just 5 years old when he vanished during a weekend visit with his father more than two years ago. Giovani would now be 7 years old. His father, Ernesto Gonzalez, claimed he killed Giovani, but the boy`s body never found. Any information, please, call Lynn Massachusetts Police, 781-595- 2000.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Calls that have been received, any information that`s come in, we followed through on, we have people looking at, and at this point, we`re still looking for two missing girls.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Their families left wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: On September 15th, 1979, 12-year-old Kimberly King was staying at her grandparent`s home in Warren, Michigan. She planned to sleep over at the house of a friend who lived across the street, but that didn`t happen.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think we`ve all come to grips with the fact that Kimberly probably will never come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: To this day, the case remains open, but the trail has run dry.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We never had that one moment of closure like you would with a funeral, where you weep and you grieve and you move forward.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Cops say the case was initially treated as a runaway.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: An individual who looked very, very similar to Kim and roughly the same age, my detectives, ultimately, located this girl. They actually brought her to the station to be printed as well as photographed.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: But eventually came to believe, Kimberly met foul play.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was so similar to Kim, however, you know, she obviously was not her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was a very happy-go-lucky child. She could be happy playing by herself. She was happy in a group of friends.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Investigators have no clear evidence to tell them whether Kimberly is dead or alive. Police have taken DNA samples from family members in case Kimberly`s remains are ever found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We loved each other. We looked out for each other. I was the oldest. Kim was the youngest. So, naturally, there was the protective nature to that relationship.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And Kimberly`s family needs your help.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And yes, you couldn`t have found three closer sisters when we were little.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So, when I looked around, I didn`t see him. I was like, where is he at? But then, I`m thinking that maybe he`s somewhere in the park. I was hoping. But I just felt like something was wrong. Swept it all and leave my faith (ph). He`s always with me. It`s like you`re having a dream and you, like, you don`t want to wake up because this dream is so horrible that you just don`t really want to deal with it.

There`s always that why, or who took him, or -- we pray all the time. My sisters pray. I pray. You know, that Christopher will come home to us one day. So, there`s always that hope. There`s still that part of you that you know is out there that you don`t know what`s going on with him, what happened to him. Is he still alive? Do he got kids? You just don`t know nothing.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Sat Jan 22, 2011 9:12 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Cherri11

January 21, 2011
Cherrie Mahan: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 11:40 AM ET

A new tip described as “potentially crucial” could be the key needed to end the near quarter century search for Cherrie Mahan. Just 8 years old when she disappeared after getting off her school bus on February 22, 1985, Mahan would be 34 years old now.


Police say the bus stop was about 50 yards away from her home in Winfield Township in Western Pennsylvania. The bus driver and other children remember seeing Cherrie get off the bus, but after that she was gone. Over the years reports have swirled about a 1976 model van with a painted mural of a snow-capped mountain on the side, but police say there was also a small blue car near the bus. Despite seven boxes filled with evidence and hundreds of tips, none have led to Cherrie.

Tipline: 1-800-THE-LOST
Missing Since: February 22, 1985
Missing From: Winfield Township, PA
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 8
Age Now: 34
Date Of Birth: 08/14/1976
Height at Disappearance: 4’2”
Weight at Disappearance: 68 lbs
Eyes: Hazel
Hair: Brown
Characteristics: Pierced ears
Clothing:-Gray coat
-Blue denim skirt
-Blue leg warmers & beige boots




8-Year-Old Missing for Over 20 Years

Aired January 21, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on "Nancy Grace."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There is a god.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

NANCY GRACE, CNNHN HOST, "NANCY GRACE": Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

MCKINNEY: Cherrie was just, she was a gift. She was just a gift from god.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ever since Cherrie was old enough to go to school, Janice said she walked her car to and from the bus stop. She had to go about 200 feet around that bend to get to her driveway, then another 300 feet to her front door.

February 22nd, 1985, Cherrie Mahan went to school and never came home. That day, Janice McKinney went from being the mother of a bubbly eight- year-old who loved rainbows and reading, to a mother of a missing child.

JANICE MCKINNEY, MOTHER OF CHERRIE MAHAN: I think that the last words that I probably told her was, you know, "Have a good day and I do love you." And that was probably as I took her down to the bus stop and she got on the bus.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Janice called state police and tracked down Cherrie`s school bus. She had to be sure Cherrie wasn`t still on it. Children on the bus told Janice and police Cherrie got off at her regular stop with young children. Those young witnesses described a blue van behind the bus with a snow cap mountain and a skier painted on its side.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There was no sign of any tracks or anything. Apparently someone picked her up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators checked out hundreds of leads. No van, no Cherrie.

MCKINNEY: Up until that day I was there. And if I would have been there, she wouldn`t -- I wouldn`t be going through this.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: After combing through hundreds upon hundreds of tips, police announce someone has provided, quote, "potentially crucial information."

MCKINNEY: As a mother, in my heart I feel and I`ve always felt that she was OK. But not knowing is probably the killer of all things, and guilt, the guilt that I feel for not being there every year just gets a little harder.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, CNNHN HOST, "NANCY GRACE": Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we -- 50 people, 50 days. For 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, grandparents. They are gone, but where?

Tonight, eight-year-old Cherrie Mahan steps off a school bus at her bus stop just 150 yards away from her own home. She disappears into thin air. Leads about a mysterious van emerge, a van with a painting of a mountain scene on the side, reported driving, cruising the neighborhood, but that van never found.

Eight-year-old Cherrie, the very first child ever featured on "Have you seen me?" advertising flyers. Years passed. Literally thousands of leads come and go. Now police just announce someone has provided potentially crucial information about Cherrie`s case. What is it? Why now? For the latest, Jean Casarez. Jean Casarez, give me a timeline. What happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": It was a very normal day. February 22nd, 1985. Cherrie Mahan had gone to school just like all the other little schoolchildren had. She was coming home on the bus. She lived so close to the school, her parents could hear the bus come. It was 100 yards from her doorstep to the bus.

They thought, it`s a nice day, we`ll just let her walk home. Her schoolmates saw her get off the bus. Some parents there to pick up their children saw her. And that was the last time she was ever seen.

To Natisha Lance, "Nancy Grace" producer, there was some vehicles in the area that over the last years have provided much interest to authorities, right?

NATISHA LANCE, "NANCY GRACE" PRODUCER: Right, Jean. There were actually students on the bus who witnessed a dark blue van that was trailing behind the bus. Now, this van was very distinctive. It had a paint of a snow cap mountain with a skier going down the mountain dressed in yellow and red clothing. Now, in addition to that van, Jean, police tell us, today, there was also a small blue car that was in the vicinity of the day Cherrie disappeared.

CASAREZ: To David Lohr, crime reporter, AOLnews.com, joining us tonight from Erie, Pennsylvania. What more can you tell us about the background of this case?

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER, AOLNEWS.COM: Well, you know, I`ve been working in crime and missing persons for about 15 years now and I have to say this is one of the more bizarre cases. It`s like you had said, the child seemed to have disappeared when she didn`t walk up the driveway. The father went looking for her after about ten minutes and didn`t see her anywhere.

And probably one of probably the largest searches that had ever been held in that area was launched. Hundreds of volunteers came out. They searched wooded areas. They went up and down roadways, nothing. Not a sign of the little girl, her book bag, not a single clue. The only thing the father saw was some tire tracks out on the road and that was it. Whether the girl got in that van or another vehicle, it remains unclear.

CASAREZ: We have a very special guest tonight joining us from Pennsylvania near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Janice McKinney. She is the mother of Cherrie Mahan. I want to tell you, Janice, I look at the picture of your little girl and it takes my breath away. She is precious, precious. Thank you for joining us. Can you go through with us what happened on that day?

MCKINNEY: Well, she got up, took her down to the bus stop because I was off that day from work. Took her down, she got on the bus, went to school. I went home up over the hill and we were going to go shopping because she had gotten a care bear for Christmas and the dog had chewed its face off, so we were going to go shopping and buy a new one.

So my husband, he works for the post office, and he was at work. He worked four-hour shifts. So he went into work and then he came home. We went shopping, bought the new care bear, came back. And it was getting closer to the time for her to come home, and he had said to me, should we let her walk up? I said, yes.

You know, it was nice. The sun was shining. The snow had melted. And we just felt that she was going to go spend the night with some friends, so you know, she would have came right up over the hill to us. So we didn`t think much of it at the time.

CASAREZ: You know, Janice, I know you have heard this, but I want to talk a law enforcement about this. There is a new lead in your case that just came up, I think about a week ago at least in 2011.

Trooper Robert McGraw is joining us tonight. He is the current lead investigator on this case, from the Pennsylvania state police, joining us from Butler, Pennsylvania, tonight. Thank you, trooper, for joining us. What is the news? You have a new lead on this case, potentially very important?

ROBERT MCGRAW, TROOPER, PENNSYLVANIA STATE POLICE: That`s correct, Jean. There`s been an individual that`s come forward to Pennsylvania state police and the information that they have provided has the potential to be crucial to this investigation in the future.

CASAREZ: Did this person walk in to an office in Pennsylvania in person or was it someone that called anonymously on a phone?

MCGRAW: They came to the Pennsylvania state police butler barracks in person, Jean.

CASAREZ: They came in person. Why did they wait 25 years?

MCGRAW: Jean, I`m not going to give the details of that right now. I just know that this person is doing the right thing now?

CASAREZ: So are you currently working this lead and working it hard?

MCGRAW: Absolutely, Jean. The Pennsylvania state police are actively and aggressively pursuing this new information.

CASAREZ: Would you say since 1985 that this is one of the strongest leads you`ve ever had?

MCGRAW: Absolutely, Jean.

CASAREZ: Trooper, is there a chance that Cherrie is alive?

MCGRAW: There is a chance, Jean, and I`ve discussed this with Janice. And she realizes, in my opinion it`s highly unlikely that Cherrie is still alive, but yes, there is a chance.

CASAREZ: To Janice McKinney, who is the mother of beautiful Cherrie you see in the picture. Also you see that age progression right there, what she would look like, may look like today. Janice, what goes on inside of you when you hear about the most important lead in the case that has come since 1985?

MCKINNEY: Well, I just hope that it`s something solid and can put my heart at rest. But not knowing is, it eats away at you day after day after day. The not knowing, I`m telling you, it`s terrible.

CASAREZ: We can`t imagine. We can`t imagine what it would be like to not have the questions answered.

I want to go out to Marc Klaas, president and founder of KlaasKids Foundation joining us tonight. When you hear all of this and you hear this lead that we now know, the trooper from Pennsylvania is telling us, trooper McGraw, that it is the most important lead since 1985 when she went missing. What does that say to you, marc?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, remember, just a couple of days ago a case was resolved after 23 years and it was resolved almost in a storybook fashion, very successfully. There`s also the Jaycee Dugard story which has similarities to this story. It involved the school bus. It involved the snatch right in front of the house. It just so happens in that case she was leaving for school and in this case she was coming home from school. So obviously there`s always hope.

But, Jean, I`ve been listening to family members all week of children that have been missing for a very, very long time, and I have to tell you that my heart just goes out for all of them, and I understand where they`re coming from, and I have to tell you that as difficult as it was to hear that my daughter was dead, I`m in a better place knowing where my daughter is than these parents are who are still held up in limbo sometimes after decades, and my heart just goes out to all of them.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MCKINNEY: I`ve always felt that she was OK. I just don`t know whether she`s dead or alive. If she was alive, I felt that she was being taken care of and that she`s OK, but if she was dead that god was taking care of her, my dad was taking care of her, my brother was taking care of her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MCKINNEY: If they were in my shoes, I don`t know that they could stand it. I think whoever knows, I think that, and I hope that the guilt has gotten to them.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: February 2nd, 1985, Cherrie Mahan got off her school bus and never made it home.

MCKINNEY: At 4:00, the bus came and we heard it and she just never came up the driveway. I should have been there when Cherrie got of the school bus, and I wasn`t.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She literally vanishes, never seen or heard from again. Police investigate the many leads that come in but remain baffled.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Maybe there`s something I overlooked at the time, but I followed every lead that I thought that night.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Who preyed on an innocent eight-year-old girl? And is Cherrie Mahan still alive?

MCKINNEY: I`ve always felt that she was OK. I just don`t know whether she was dead or alive. If she was alive, I felt she was being taken care of and that she`s OK, but if she was dead that god was taking care of her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: We are taking your calls live tonight. I`m Jean Casarez. Help us find Cherrie Mahan. She was the first person, the first missing person to be featured on the "Have you seen me?" advertising circulars back in May, 1985.

To Natisha Lance, her photograph, Cherrie Mahan`s photograph was circulated all around this country. Just describe for us some of the ways that people got to see this missing little girl.

LANCE: Jean, it was on bumper stickers, it was through flyers. It was through those postcards that you just mentioned. And what the goal was with those postcards is every person who has a mailbox should be aware of these missing children. To date there have been 170,000 children who have been featured in these missing postcards, 158 of them -- 158,000 of them have been found. And they go out to 100 million homes every week.

CASAREZ: And Cherrie Mahan was the first, the first one. And law enforcement is telling us tonight from the Pennsylvania state police that they currently have a lead they believe is the strongest since this case happened in 1985, to solving it. I want to go out to the callers. Kelly in Oklahoma. Hi, Kelly.

KELLY IN OKLAHOMA: Hi, there, thanks for taking my call. I have one quick question. If the police announced it was someone probably she knew, and if nobody saw her get taken by somebody in the van, were other people considered -- were other family members looked at and cleared?

CASAREZ: All right. To trooper Robert McGraw from the Pennsylvania state police. Initially when this happened in 1985, and really up until this day, but close to when it all began, did you canvass the area going home to home talking and searching at least verbally everything you could from anyone you could find?

MCGRAW: That is correct, Jean. The original investigators and a team of troopers canvassed the area and did numerous, numerous area interviews at the time of Cherrie`s disappearance.

CASAREZ: You did polygraphs, too, right? Who did you do polygraphs on?

MCGRAW: The mother and stepfather were both given polygraph tests.

CASAREZ: All right. What about the birth father?

MCGRAW: Jean, I`m not going to answer that question.

CASAREZ: OK. Let`s go to another caller, Hailey in Arizona. Hi, Hailey.

HALEY IN ARIZONA: Hi. I just want to say I love your show and you and Nancy, and I want to know that when that day when she was abducted, why didn`t the -- why didn`t the bus driver see the little girl, like, and the car, too, because apparently the car that distinctive then the bus driver should notice that that`s a car right there?

And the other thing is that there are other kids, and if they see that she`s walking alone, they should have went and did something and walked with her home. So --

CASAREZ: Some good questions there. Janice McKinney, who is the mother of Cherrie, how do you think that all happened? Obviously a bus has to keep going. They have children, other children on it that they have to get home. Do you think that everyone just sort of drifted off and Cherrie was the last one?

MCKINNEY: Yes. That`s exactly what happened. The kids turned and the other kids that got off the bus, they turned and started to walk up their driveway and Cherrie turned and started to walk back toward our driveway. So they all kind of went in their own separate little directions. So --

CASAREZ: Very quickly, the blue van, everybody`s heard about the blue van for years with the skier on the side. But what about the blue car? Have you heard about that from the beginning?

MCKINNEY: The car was always there. It was just we didn`t -- it was not focused on at the time.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MCKINNEY: There is somebody out there that knows, and sometimes guilt will eat your way into, you have to tell somebody, and I`m just hoping that maybe this will be the year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was a February day in 1985 when eight-year- old Cherrie Mahan got off the school bus to make the 100-yard walk to her front door. She never made it.

MCKINNEY: Caring, I never will stop caring for Cherrie, and the heartache, it gets worse and worse.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Witnesses reported seeing a light blue van with a painting of a mountain and skier on the side parked right behind the bus stop. Authorities conducted interviews, polygraphed the family, and investigated tips, but were without a clue to lead them to Cherrie.

MCKINNEY: Sometimes guilt will eat you away until you have to tell somebody, and I`m just hoping that maybe this will be the year.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Cherrie Mahan, this was a very rural area in Pennsylvania. It wasn`t a big city. It was Winfield Township, Pennsylvania near Pittsburgh, a very small town area, where everybody knew everybody. She got off her school bus, this eight-year-old little girl in 1985, and she was never seen again.

Let`s go out to Yolanda in Georgia. Hi, Yolanda.

YOLANDA IN GEORGIA: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

YOLANDA: Thank you so much. Jean, I would like to tell you that I really enjoy yours and Nancy and all the others that help with finding the children. These are wonderful programs.

MCKINNEY: You know, Yolanda, this whole week what has struck me is how easily someone can just disappear. And it can be anybody. I think that`s one lesson we are all learning from this. What`s your question tonight?

YOLANDA: Jean, I would like to know why do they keep showing the cemetery if the girl is missing?

CASAREZ: That`s a very good question and we do have the answer for you. Natisha Lance, something happened and that is why we see a cemetery plot for Cherrie Mahan. Explain that to everybody.

LANCE: Back in 1998 Cherrie`s mother went to a judge and had her legally declared deceased. There`s a reason for this. Before Cherrie went missing, there was a traffic accident and she won a claim from an insurance company for $3,500. Cherrie`s mother felt it was now time to move on, award that money to her son who she did have, the child she still had living. But she still held out hope Cherrie would be found alive.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MCKINNEY: Cherrie was just, she was a gift. She was just a gift from god. When people die and they`re gone, you go to a funeral home and you mourn them and you have someplace to go to.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days. 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

JANICE MCKINNEY, MOM OF MISSING 8-YEAR-OLD GIRL: Cherrie was just, she was a gift. She was just a gift from God.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ever since Cherrie was old enough to go to school, Janice says she walked her daughter to and from the bus stop.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She had to go about 200 feet around that bend to get to her driveway then another 300 feet to her front door.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: February 22nd, 1985, Cherrie Mahan went to school and never came home. That day, Janice McKinney went from being a mother of a bubbly 8-year-old who loved rainbows and reading, to the mother of a missing child.

MCKINNEY: I think that the last words that I probably told her was, you know, have a good day and I do love you. And that was probably as I took her down to the bus stop and she got on the bus.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Janice called state police and tracked down Cherrie`s school bus. She had to be sure Cherrie wasn`t still on it. Children on the bus told Janice and police Cherrie got of at her regular stop with other children. Those young witnesses described a blue van right behind the bus with a snow cap mountain and a skier painted on its side.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There was no sign of any tracks or anything. Apparently, someone picked her up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators checked out hundreds of leads, no van, no Cherrie.

MCKINNEY: Up until that day, I was there, and if I would have been there, I wouldn`t be going through this.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: After combing through hundreds upon hundreds of tips, police announce someone has provided, quote, "potentially crucial information."

MCKINNEY: As a mother, in my heart, I feel and I`ve always felt that she was OK. The not knowing is probably the killer of all things, and guilt, the guilt that I feel for no being there. Every year just gets a little harder.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

JEAN CASAREZ, HOST: I`m Jean Casarez. Help us find Cherrie Mahan. If you know something, do the right thing. This all happened in Pennsylvania, the western part of Pennsylvania. I want to go out to David Lohr, crime reporter for aol.com, joining us tonight from Erie, Pennsylvania. When Cherrie got off of her school bus, we understand there were two vehicles in the vicinity of that school bus, one being a van, but it wasn`t just any van. It was a very unique van. David, describe those vehicles for us.

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER: Well, the van was very distinct. It was a bluish-green in color and it had a mountain scene painted on the side of it with a skier. And what`s interesting about that is here you have a vehicle with such a unique paint job and nobody`s ever seen it since. You know, they put descriptions of it out there. They had artist renditions, and nobody`s ever came forward and said that they`ve seen the vehicle anywhere. And as far as the car goes, you know, it`s basically just a -- it was a late model vehicle at the time. A blue car, inconspicuous, and whether or not it`s connected to the case, we don`t know.

CASAREZ: To Trooper Robert McGraw, he is the lead investigator from the Pennsylvania State Police on this case now joining us from Butler, Pennsylvania. The blue car, was that in a driveway that was close to where the school bus stopped?

VOICE OF TROOPER ROBERT MCGRAW, PENNSYLVANIA STATE POLICE: That`s correct, Jean. And if I may clarify, Jean, in regards to your earlier question, I just want you and your viewers to know that Cherrie`s biological father is not a person of interest in this investigation.

CASAREZ: OK. All right. Thank you very much for clarifying that. Trooper McGraw, you had someone walk into your office to talk to you and your associates. And you say this could be a critically important lead in solving this case?

MCGRAW: That`s correct, Jean. On the flip side of that coin, Jean, this could take us to a dead end, but we will actively and aggressively pursue this lead to find out if it`s viable or if this is another dead end, but we are highly optimistic about what we`re working on right now, Jean.

CASAREZ: Now, did this happen in 2011, since the first of the year?

MCGRAW: I won`t answer that, Jean.

CASAREZ: All right. When do you think you`ll have information that you can publicly announce?

MCGRAW: Tough question to answer, Jean. We are actively and aggressively pursuing this lead as we speak, and hopefully, as soon as we can track down some leads in conjunction with the information that`s been provided, hopefully, we can have some answers.

CASAREZ: You know, trooper, just to hear you say that this is a potentially very important lead, I mean, it fills our hearts with hope. And we know you`ve tempered that by saying that it may lead to a dead end, but I hear in your voice that you believe there is a relevancy to the lead that you have found. Let`s go to Elizabeth in Alabama. Hi, Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH, ALABAMA: Hi. How are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling tonight.

ELIZABETH: I just wanted to say that my heart goes out to this mother who has had this happen to her child, and no one deserves to have this. And I hope that she gets some answers soon so that she can rest, you know, since this has happened to her.

My question is, since this van has some, you know, identifying marks that are unusual, has law enforcement checked with -- I know that they`ve sought out all possible leads as far as no one`s come forward about, you know, the paint job or anything, but have they checked with, you know, finding out about auto body shops, with who has done a paint job on this or have they checked with insurance companies to find out who the vehicle may be registered to or anything that way?

CASAREZ: You know, Elizabeth, you are so right. I mean, this van was so unique and never to be seen. Again, let`s go out to Sheryl McCollum, crime case analyst, director of the cold case squad, Pine Lake PD, joining us tonight from Atlanta. Sheryl, what do you make of this? This is a van that you would remember, but nobody ever saw it again.

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: It may not be from the area. And maybe when they put out the alerts, the person has gone back to Colorado. The problem I`m having with the van, sometimes, when I see vehicles like this in an abduction case, it makes me think there could be two perpetrators in that van, one driving and one snatching the child from the side. So, we wouldn`t rule that out.

You know, the blue car, that to me kind of signifies that maybe it`s a person that knew her and said, hey, you know, your mom wanted me to come pick you up and the child just jumps in. So, the tire tracks would be something that I would want to see. What direction were they going? Did they do, you know a u-turn? Was it a k-turn? That`s the kind of thing I would want to see about those tires.

CASAREZ: To Joey Jackson, defense attorney out of New York. Since there is a lead now, someone walked into a Pennsylvania State Troopers office, what are your thoughts? if someone knows information out there, but they are concerned that they may be prosecuted because they`ve held this for so long, what advice do you give them?

JOEY JACKSON, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Yes. You know what, I think that there`s a lot of bargaining chips here, Jean, because I think in the final analysis, what you want is you want the safe return of this person with her family. And as a result of that, I mean, certainly, there are going to be chips that have to fall, but if ever there`s going to be a negotiation with a prosecutor or what have you, now would be that time because you`re in a strengthen position.

You have the ability after so long to solve this case, and as a result, you contact a lawyer, you negotiate in advance, you go on, and hopefully, things work out well for all parties concerned, Jean.

CASAREZ: John Manuelian, criminal defense attorney joining us out of Los Angeles tonight. Thoughts?

JOHN MANUELIAN, CRIMINAL, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I completely agree. A lawyer`s job is to convince this potential client that number one, look, you`re in a lot of trouble. You want to make it easy for yourself. You want to convince the client that the best interest of the child are at stake. Just give the information up and then you want to contact the prosecutor`s office and then make something happen as far as a deal before the arrest of your client.

CASAREZ: And I think you`re so right. If prosecution is in order, prosecution is in order, but the point is to resolve this case and find Cherrie Mahan.

And also tonight, please help us find James Eunice. He`s 17 years old. He disappeared on January 15th, 2011 from Valdosta, Georgia. He is a white male, 6`3", 180 pounds. He has brown hair and blue eyes. If you have any information, please call 229-671-2950. If your loved one is missing and you need our help, please go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MCKINNEY: Caring, I never will stop caring for Cherrie and the heartache, it gets worse and worse.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Tears have not healed the emotional wounds of Janice McKinney with an 8-year-old daughter, Cherrie Ann Mahan vanished February 22nd, 1985.

MCKINNEY: The not knowing is probably the killer of all things, and the guilt that I feel for not being there. Every year just gets a little harder.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Janice and Cherrie`s stepfather, Leroy, were not there when Cherrie got off her school bus about 100 yards from the family`s home. This recreation aired nationally after other children say they saw Cherrie walk to a blue van with the mural of a mountain and a skier.

MCKINNEY: That van fell off the face of the earth. It went into a black hole with her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Cherrie`s grandmother, Shirley, who paid psychics over the year to help find clues has now lost hope of ever finding her little angel alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I truly in my heart feel that she is dead. I think that her grandfather and her uncle are watching over her in heaven.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. I want to go straight out to Trooper Robert McGraw with the Pennsylvania State Police. And trooper, we want to tell everybody that if anyone knows anything about Cherrie Mahan, you can call 1-800-the-lost or that is 1-800-843-5678. And trooper, if anyone is in Pennsylvania, they can walk into an office just like someone did recently, or if they`re in other parts of the country, they can call this number, right?

MCGRAW: That`s correct.

CASAREZ: I want to ask you about this van. We don`t want to put too much significance on this van, but yet, it was one of two vehicles that was right there that day. At the time, did people, investigators go to body shops in this area to see if anyone had done this work? Because this was specialized work to have this painting on the sides.

MCGRAW: They did, Jean. I can assure you, Jean, that the three lead investigators who worked this case before me, they put their heart and soul into this case and they pored over hundreds upon hundreds leads, many involving van sightings and checking on auto body shops and paint jobs and the such. They were -- many leads were tracked down and referenced to that paint job in that van.

CASAREZ: So, do you believe that paint job was done outside of the Western Pennsylvania area?

MCGRAW: Jean, that`s a difficult question to answer. I`m not 100 percent certain that that`s the paint job, Jean. I know that that was the artist`s rendition from two of the children who witnessed the van, but that paint job, it could be slightly different, Jean. We could be looking for a different type of paint job on a van. And Jean, I want your viewers to know there`s also a possibility that that van had absolutely nothing to do with Cherrie`s abduction.

CASAREZ: Right. Right. Good point. Out to Edna in Illinois. Hi, Edna.

EDNA, ILLINOIS: Hi. I heard the mother make a remark that the little girl was going to go for a sleep over. Could anything have been connected to the sleep over? That they came and let her think that they were picking her up early or something?

CASAREZ: Hmm. Hmm. Janice McKinney, mother of Cherrie, joining us tonight from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was going to go for a sleep over that night? What was that?

MCKINNEY: Yes, she was. The people that she was going to go stay with, matter of fact, they probably were at my house within an hour after, you know, Cherrie was -- I figured out that Cherrie was kidnapped. They came, they helped. They were there for hours and days, afterwards. So, no, they had nothing to do with it.

CASAREZ: Right. Janice, what is life like for you now? I mean, just -- I don`t even want to ask you if you`ve moved on. How could you move on? Do you think about Cherrie every day?

MCKINNEY: Yes, there`s not one day that I don`t think about her. On my way to work, on my way home from work, at my desk, I`m constantly praying for her. If she`s not alive, that my mom and my brothers are taking care of her. I just need to know. I want to know what happened to her. I want to know where she is.

CASAREZ: And you may because we had Trooper Robert McGraw tell us tonight that the strongest tip since 1985 has come into the Pennsylvania State Police. So, you may have some answers. I want to go to Carol in Indiana. Hi, Carol.

CAROL, INDIANA: Hello, Jean. Thank you so much for taking my call.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

CAROL: It`s very emotional for me. I`ve been where these people are. My son was missing for 16 years, and from 1993 to 2009, and thanks to a state trooper in Indiana, he was found alive in Mississippi.

CASAREZ: Carol --

CAROL: Go ahead, I`m sorry.

CASAREZ: Carol, what words can you tell Janice McKinney tonight?

CAROL: I feel your pain. I`ve been there. My thoughts go out to you and my prayers. I believe in miracles, because a miracle happened in my life. And I didn`t know where my son was for 16 years, and he was an adult when he left. He was 22, but he just disappeared and was not heard from again for 16 long years. Not a day went by that I didn`t grieve. My heart was broken, but when he was found, my heart was healed.

CASAREZ: Carol in Indiana, thank you so much for calling tonight.

And now to tonight`s "CNN Heroes."

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DR. ROSEANNA MEANS, MEDICAL MARVEL: Every week, I talk to women who are sleeping outside.

It`s only 17 degrees out, so I didn`t want you to get frozen.

There`s so much pain and suffering right on the fringes of our perspective.

Do you need some help, hon?

In Boston, despite all the medical resources for the homeless population, I was seeing very few of the women using the services. For women who are poor, homeless, or battered to deal with a system of health care becomes overwhelming. They don`t have an address, they don`t have a phone. There are lots of emotional issues, psychiatric issues. I just didn`t like the idea that they were falling through the cracks.

I`m Dr. Roseanna Means, and I bring free my quality medical care to women and children in the shelters of Boston.

Good morning.

The women come into the shelters to get warm and to feel safe, and we`re there.

Come on in.

There`s no registration. We`re not charging anything.

If they want to come see us, we`ll use that moment to try to build a relationship.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This is my safety net right here.

MEANS: Women learn to trust us as ambassadors of the health care system.

God bless.

Over time, we can teach them how to use the system as it was intended, and eventually, they do move forward.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Because I knew she really cared, I started wanting to take care of myself.

MEANS: I love these women no matter what.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You did a great job.

MEANS: That starts to get taken inside. That if I matter to somebody else, maybe I matter to myself.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Their families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing tonight, Deniese Hiraman. Deniese was 13 years old when she went missing from her home in Queens, New York, in 1999.

Byron Page was a good student with a bright future until he disappeared in Los Angeles in 1992.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was so devastating for my family and me.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now, his family spends every day praying for a break in the case.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He`s out there somewhere. I just don`t know where. And my hope that if not in my lifetime, his brother finds him to fill that void in his life as well.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I must have arrived home about 5:00, and Byron wasn`t home, which was unusual. When Byron didn`t come home by 6:00, I was alarmed. I called 911. We reported him missing. I guess, I must have spent a month at least passing out posters and doing everything I could. I was just so distraught. I started working a lot of overtime, simply because I didn`t want to come home. Byron loved comic books, writing, and music.

When he was 16, he wanted to play football. I was not happy. But Byron had made up his mind. He joined the football team, and he had a really good season. He really enjoyed it, but I was very relieved when the season was over. I know that there is not a day goes by that we don`t think of Byron. I guess you just have to find the happiness and the peace of mind within yourself, and it`s an ongoing process.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Mon Jan 24, 2011 11:10 pm

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Julie-10

January 24, 2011
Julie Ann Gonzalez: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 09:00 AM ET

21 year old Mom, Julie Ann Gonzalez, was last seen on March 26, 2010 by her estranged husband, George De La Cruz, when she came to pick up the couple’s daughter

Two days later police found Gonzalez’s vehicle abandoned in a Walgreen’s parking lot in South Austin. She has not been seen or heard from since. Suspicious purchases were made on the pharmacy technician’s debit card on the day of her disappearance by her husband, but where was she? Search warrant affidavits reveal police believe Gonzalez may have been met with foul play at the hands of her soon to be ex-husband.

TIPLINE: (512) 477-3588
Reward: $20,000 offered by Gonzalez Family
Missing Since: March 26, 2010
Missing From: Austin, TX
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 21
Height: 5 feet
Weight: 140 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brownish-Black
Identifying Marks: Piercing above right lip
Car Found: Gold Chevy Impala found March 28 at Walgreens in South Austin




21-Year-Old Mom Vanishes

Aired January 24, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

GRACE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Julie Ann is beautiful. You could just look into her eyes and see that she is a kind person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: At 21 years old, Julie Ann Gonzalez was turning over a new leaf. Although in the midst of a contentious divorce, the young mother was optimistic about her future.

She had just bought a new car and was enjoying the job she`d had for a bit more than a year as a pharmacy technician. A friend even says Julie recently met a man who put a smile on her face. March 26th, 2010, is the last time anyone has seen that smile.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I wouldn`t wish this upon my worst enemy. I wouldn`t wish this upon anybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: March 26th, 2010, Julie went to her estranged husband`s house to pick up their then 2-year-old daughter. The two shared custody. But according to the husband, George Dela Cruz, something was off with Julie. She seemed spaced out and kind of down.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`d be willing to do anything, a lie detector, they can search my house, tear it apart. If they do, they can do that. They could actually put a police to track me down anywhere. Like I said, I have nothing to hide.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Allegedly she made a request that her family says seems out of character. She asked Dela Cruz to keep their daughter through the weekend so she could spend some time alone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was making plans Friday. She said she was going to run errands. That`s her day off. She made plans to go see the baby-sitter to pay the baby-sitter. She made plans to go to a baby shower we were going to be having on Sunday.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just a few hours after the last sighting of Julie Ann, the estranged husband is captured on video with the 2-year-old at a Wal-Mart buying a video with Julie Ann`s debit card. On March 28th, her car is found abandoned in a nearby Walgreen`s parking lot.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Now almost a year since Gonzalez`s mysterious disappearance, Austin police believe Gonzalez may have been murdered.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting and neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights, we go live spotlighting America`s children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, missing. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, 21-year-old Julie Ann Gonzalez goes to pick up her 2-year-old baby girl. It`s the last time she`s ever seen. A few days later, her car found abandoned in a Walgreens parking lot. Two months later police execute a search warrant on the estranged husband`s home, reportedly finding drops of blood, hair.

Tonight, where is Julie Ann Gonzalez? Let`s kick it off with our friend, "Inside Edition`s" anchor Deborah Norville. Deborah, what do you think about this case?

DEBORAH NORVILLE, ANCHOR, INSIDE EDITION: I think it`s really something, Nancy. I mean, this is a young woman who had gone to pick up her daughter. She`d gone early. She was supposed to pick her up at 4:30 in the afternoon. She got there at 10:30 according to the estranged husband.

A lot of the information we have is information that came from the estranged husband, a man that she filed to divorce just a couple months earlier. They`d only been married six months although they had this baby together. So there was a big gulf in this relationship.

He had had a suicide attempt earlier, so clearly this is a man who didn`t want this relationship to end and I don`t know. I mean, you read the facts of the case and one of the things that strikes me is when they finally searched the car.

And this was a couple of months after the mom went missing. They found the baby`s medicine, her prescription in the car. I don`t know many moms who would drop their kids off at the sitter or leave them with anyone if they needed medicine and didn`t hand the medicine off along with the diaper.

GRACE: Deborah Norville, don`t get me wrong, I`m not mad at you, but did you just say a few months later they search her car?

NORVILLE: They did. It was at least two months before the police actually looked at the car. The car had been found abandoned in a Wal-Mart parking lot. Excuse me, a Walgreen parking about a half a mile from the estrange husband`s home and it was taken to a tow yard.

There it sat for a while until finally police looked at the car and searched it. Now there doesn`t seem to be any indication anybody else had tampered with the car, it`s an awful long period of time when you have an active missing person`s case.

A lot of things started happening in the case two months after this young woman went missing. Two months after this young woman went missing, the search warrant was executed on the estrange husband`s home, a home he shared with his mother. He apparently lived with his mom along with his daughter.

She had lived there, too, during that brief period that they were married. In the divorce papers she states that same address as her residence. She was not living there at the time of her disappearance. When they made the search, one of the things that`s rather interesting is there was a hole in a shed and there seems to be some conflicting information about just when that hole in the shed was dug.

There`s one variation of the story where it was dug for plumbing purposes, by previous owners. There`s another variation that said it wasn`t here when we bought the house. That`s another one of those things that I think have stuck out to the police in looking into this and deciding that this man is more than just a person of interest and the search warrants that were executed, they called him a suspect in the murder of this young woman.

GRACE: Also investigating the case along with Deborah Norville, Jean Casarez, legal correspondent, "In Session." Jean, what more can you tell me?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, for two months, they believe Julie Ann Gonzalez just left on her own. She left her 2-year-old child. She left her full-time job as a pharmacist assistant at Walgreens and she left her brand new car.

You know why they decided that maybe she didn`t leave on her own? Was because of some text messages that she sent from her phone right after she went missing, they believe for those two months she`d sent them, even though it appears, though, that maybe she didn`t. Maybe somebody else sent them in her name.

GRACE: We are taking your calls. To Vicki in Alabama. Hi, Vicki.

CALLER: Hi, Nancy. I would like to ask, I actually changed my question, but in Texas it seems like a lot of women are going missing. And the police are really not doing their jobs.

I mean, the girl on the show before, it looked like maybe they didn`t have money, maybe they didn`t check them out because of that. And in this case, it looks like because of their age the police didn`t check her out.

I mean, two months and not check her car, come on. I mean, I live in a small community and they would do better than that really.

GRACE: Two months is crazy. To you, Sheryl McCollum, you`re the crime analyst, director of the Cold Case Squad, Pine Lake PD, author of "Cold Case."

You know, this wasn`t a cold case. You know, I almost always side with the cops, Sheryl, but the only reason they got cold is because police let it get cold. To not search for car that was found abandoned, who knows what they could have found blood, hair, fingerprints.

They found, as Deborah Norville pointed out, the baby`s medicine. Now, Sheryl, you know my children John David and Lucy. Do you really think I would leave their medication --

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: No.

GRACE: -- in the car and drop them off somewhere and leave for a few days of alone time? No.

MCCOLLUM: Exactly.

GRACE: I mean, I can smell that story, it stinks from here.

MCCOLLUM: Nancy, she had a new man. She had a job she enjoyed. She had family. She had future plans. She has a 2-year-old she adores. This is not when you leave.

The deal with the car that bothers me is how did law enforcement know she wasn`t in the trunk? And didn`t need their help in some way?

The other thing that bothers me is, it`s still her husband. I heard him say on your beginning, come search anything I`ve got. Then give us permission to search her car. They could have got a search warrant in three minutes.

GRACE: Joining me right now, special guest, also taking your calls. This is Julie Ann Gonzalez`s mother, Sandra Soto. Miss Soto, thank you so much for being with us.

SANDRA SOTO, MOM OF MISSING WOMAN, JULIE ANN GONZALEZ: Thank you for having me, Nancy.

GRACE: Miss Soto, what can you tell me about Julie Ann as a person? Would she ever have left her children somewhere?

SOTO: Never. Never. Julie would have never done that to Layla. Layla is her everything. Julie was getting away from George because of the abusive relationship that they had and she did not want her daughter to see that anymore.

She didn`t want her daughter to live that way, so she got away from George. She was strong enough to do this. She was going on with her life. She had a full-time job. She had just bought herself a new car because her husband took the other car away from her.

He said, you know, the car that you have and that you`re using to get to and from work, it`s still mine, so I want it back. So he took it back and she didn`t argue with him. That`s fine. You know, because she was working and she was -- she knew what she had to do and she was doing everything.

She was not a party girl. She was not the type of person that was irresponsible. She would pick up Layla from the baby-sitter every day, drop her off, took her time, you know, working, being a pharmacy technician, you know, she made sure that Layla had everything that she needed at all times.

You know, you`re right about the medicine. You know, Julie, being a pharmacy tech, knows how important it is to have her medicine with you. Why would she not give it to George if she was going away? She wouldn`t have done that.

GRACE: Miss Soto, everyone, taking your calls is Julie Ann Gonzalez`s mother. Take a look at Julie Ann Gonzalez. The tip line number is 512- 477-3588. Take a look at this woman, left behind, her little girl. Weigh in, Deborah.

NORVILLE: Miss Soto, I`m curious, this is Deborah here. What do you think happened to your daughter?

SOTO: I think George knows exactly what happened to her and I feel that there`s more than one person involved. He couldn`t have done this by himself because he did have Layla the day that Julie disappeared.

And so I`m, you know, I still feel in my heart, like every other parent who has a missing child, that their child is out there alive somewhere, and that`s what I feel is going on here. You know, maybe he set her up to be kidnapped or taken away or just gotten rid of. Just so she wouldn`t be in his way anymore.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Gonzalez was going through a divorce and on March 26th was supposed to pick up her daughter from her estranged husband`s home. He claims Gonzalez told him she was going away for a few days. Her family doesn`t believe the story.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I wouldn`t wish this upon my worst enemy. I wouldn`t wish this upon anybody.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Texas authorities are searching for clues in the case of a missing mom whose family is desperate to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re not giving up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Gonzalez was going through a divorce and was supposed to pick up her daughter from her estranged husband`s home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The young mother of one, Julie Ann Gonzalez was last seen by her estranged husband March 26th.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He claims Gonzalez told him she was going away for a few days.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her car just purchased weeks earlier was found abandoned at a pharmacy nearby.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A few days later we found her car parked at a Walgreens.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s been no activity on Julie`s cell phone or credit cards and police don`t have any suspect.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I wouldn`t wish this upon my worst enemy. I wouldn`t wish this upon anybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The estranged husband who says he`s cooperating fully says this is totally out of character for her, that she could never leave their 2-year-old daughter, Layla.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. What happened to beautiful Julie Ann Gonzalez? Leaving behind a beautiful little girl, just like her. Her family left behind wondering, but never giving up.

Her mother with us tonight. We are taking your calls. Let`s go out to, did I go to Vicki in Alabama? Let`s go to Raven in Texas. Hi, Raven.

CALLER: Hi, Nancy. Can I just say that what you do on your show really inspires me?

GRACE: Raven, thank you so much. I don`t feel that way at all, but thank you very much. You saying that inspires me to keep going. What`s your question, Love?

CALLER: What I`m wondering, what excuse could the police possibly have for not searching her car right away? It just seems like that would be one of the first places that you would look.

GRACE: Yes, you know what? It does, especially since it was abandoned. Marc Klaas, President, founder of Klaaskids Foundation. This is your expertise, missing people.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT, FOUNDER, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I don`t believe the police were aware that that was her car. I believe that it was towed to a lot and it was only some time later that connection was made. I think that is something that could be corrected through some simple database flagging.

We just have too many government databases that don`t connect or talk to each other in this country. Here`s what I`d like to point out about this. Remember, George was the last guy to see this young woman. His mom reported that there was a hole in the shed in the backyard. She`s the one who said that it was a new hole.

George said that it was an old hole. George was seen using her debit card only days after she disappeared. George failed a polygraph exam. They have found blood and hair in the home. This is a really sloppy guy who claims to have an air-tight alibi, but I would suggest that if she knocked on the door.

He opened the door, killed her right there and went along with, went on with his day that his alibi could easily be airtight, but he could still be the guy who did it.

I think it`s a fake defense and hopefully law enforcement will be able to hone in on this guy because I have no doubt that he is the perpetrator of this crime.

GRACE: Jean Casarez, what is his so-called air-tight alibi? That`s what O.J. said, too.

CASAREZ: Air-tight alibi is she came between 10:30 and 11:00 to get her daughter but said, you know what? I have to get away, just keep her for another day. So he said he did.

That afternoon he went to Wal-Mart and to McDonald`s, but here`s the thing. He used her debit card when he went to Wal-Mart and McDonald`s.

GRACE: OK, Sheryl McCollum, far from being a cold case. This guy left a track a mile wide.

MCCOLLUM: Still got away with it for a year so far. He had the means. He had the motive. He had the opportunity. She left a letter to her current boyfriend about how happy she is. That could be motive. He`s angry.

He`s angry that she`s moved on. You know, I mean, the trifecta here to me is, yes, the last person to see her, he`s got her personal property. He`s got blood. He`s got latex gloves and rope in his car, and now, Nancy, he is no longer cooperating with police. That`s a shock, isn`t it?

NORVILLE: There are other things I think, Sheryl, that also stands out. One of them is this is a conscientious young woman. She worked hard at her job. She had her check regularly deposited into her debit account.

We know that because deposits were made by the Walgreens where she worked on April the 1st, four or five days after she went missing. She never informed her employer that she was going to be gone for a few days. Again, that`s not the kind of behavior that someone who was someone who was conscientious, a good mother, a reliable individual would do.

I think another thing that`s kind of interesting. You mentioned the debit card being used. There are photographs of that gentleman using the debit card with the baby and the clothing that he`s wearing in the debit card use picture is the same outfit on a MySpace photo that was uploaded just days after the young lady disappeared.

GRACE: To Sandra Soto, the mother of Julie Ann Gonzalez, who has the baby, Sandra Soto?

SOTO: Right now she is staying with -- right now she is staying with George and his mother at their house, but I am fighting for custody of her.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The 21-year-old Julie Ann Gonzalez was last seen by her estranged husband.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Like I said I have nothing to hide and I`m here. I`m not running away.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Gonzalez was going through a divorce and on March 26th was supposed to pick up her daughter from her estranged husband`s home. He claims Gonzalez told him she was going away for a few days.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And she hasn`t been seen since.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Out to Irma in California. Hi, dear, what`s your question?

CALLER: Hi, Nancy. I love your show.

GRACE: Thank you.

CALLER: And I just wanted to ask if he is willing to take a polygraph? When he was on Dr. Phil he refused to do it. He changed his mind at the last minute.

GRACE: What do we know, Michael Board? Michael joining us from WOAI News Radio, San Antonio.

MICHAEL BOARD, REPORTER, WOAI NEWSRADIO: Nancy, no, he`s completely shut himself off to police. In the beginning he was actually working with investigators, but after they got the warrant to search his home -- after they got the warrant, found the stuff in the laundry room, that`s when he clammed up and lawyered up.

GRACE: Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, Michael Board, let`s think about what you just said. Hold on. He was cooperating with police, but after they got a warrant, why did they have to get a warrant if he`s so cooperative? You could have given them permission to come into the house.

BOARD: You know, maybe he was making an alibi all along. Maybe he thought he could outsmart the police. Nancy, this is a guy, to say he has a mental illness, that`s probably putting it lightly. It`s a more accurate statement to say George Dela Cruz is a psychotic who is off his meds and diagnosed with a mental illness and diagnosed with a mental illness.

He`s a dangerous to himself and everybody else. You know, whatever he says you probably should not trust whatsoever because this is a person -- he told police, he told police he is not taking his meds.

GRACE: Jean Casarez, why would he get to have custody if he is a paranoid schizophrenic or psychotic? Why would he get custody? I don`t believe that.

CASAREZ: Because he`s the father? I don`t have an answer for you. Child protective services obviously determined he was the best one. And you know, Nancy, I do want to say that he did take a polygraph and the determination was deception indicated in regard to knowing the whereabouts and what happened to Julie Ann Gonzalez.

GRACE: What more do police need? To Dr. Howard Oliver, former deputy medical examiner in L.A. Dr. Oliver, if they found blood and hair in the home, I guess the defense could argue it`s there innocently.

DR. OLIVER: Yes, they certainly could. The missing person at one time lived there so you would expect to find those items in the home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She says, I want to see my mom. I want to see my Julie and what can we say? You know, all we can say is she`s working, but that`s not working anymore. She`s only 2, but she`s very smart. She knows.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Julie Ann is beautiful. You can just look into her eyes and see that she is a kind person.

GRACE (voice-over): At 21 years old, Julie Ann Gonzalez was turning over a new leaf. Although in the midst of a contentious divorce, the young mother was optimistic about her future. She just bought a new car and was enjoying the job she had for a bit more than a year as a pharmacy technician. A friend even says Julie recently met a man who put a smile on her face. March 26th, 2010, is the last time anyone has seen that smile.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I wouldn`t wish this upon my worst enemy. I wouldn`t wish this upon anybody.

GRACE: March 26th, 2010, Julie went to her estranged husband`s house to pick up their then 2-year-old daughter. The two shared custody. But according to the husband, George de la Cruz, something was off with Julie. She seemed spaced out and kind of down.

GEORGE DE LA CRUZ, MISSING MOM`S ESTRANGED HUSBAND: I`ll be willing to do anything. Lie detector, they can search my house, tear it apart. If they do, they can do that. They could actually put a police to track me down everywhere. Like I said, I have nothing to hide.

GRACE: Allegedly, she made a request that her family says seems out of character. She asked De la Cruz to keep their daughter through the weekend so she could spend some time alone.

SANDRA SOTO, MOM OF MISSING WOMAN, JULIE ANN GONZALES: She was making plans. Friday, she said she was going to run errands. That`s her day off. She made plans to go see the baby-sitter to pay the baby-sitter. She made plans to go to a baby shower we were going to be having on Sunday.

GRACE: Just a few hours after the last sighting of Julie Ann, the estranged husband is captured on video with the 2-year-old at a Wal-Mart buying a video with Julie Ann`s debit card. On March 28th, her car is found abandoned at a nearby Walgreens parking lot. Now, almost a year, since Gonzalez`s mysterious disappearance, Austin police believe Gonzalez may have been murdered.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): We are taking your calls. Take a look at Julie Ann Gonzalez, leaving behind a beautiful little girl. Her mother says no way would she ever leave her daughter behind. Her mom, Sandra Soto, with us tonight. We are taking your calls. The tip line, 512-477-3588. Deborah Norville with us tonight has a question for Michael. Go ahead, Deborah.

DEBORAH NORVILLE, ANCHOR, INSIDE EDITION: Yes, Michael, you said with such authority that the person of interest in this case, the estranged husband is psychotic and has proven mental illness. What do you base that on?

MICHAEL BOARD, REPORTER, WOAI NEWSRADIO: January 2010, George de la Cruz tried to commit suicide. He was upset about the pending problems that are going on with their marriage. It was a fact -- there was a good possibility he was going to lose the custody of his daughter. He tried to commit suicide. After that, he was put on anti-anxiety medicine. He admitted to police he was of his meds. When police said, why weren`t you taking his meds? He said, we couldn`t afford them. So, this is a person who has a diagnosed mental illness and was told I`m not taking my meds.

NORVILLE: So, wait a minute, he had a diagnosis of mental illness prior to the suicide attempt?

BOARD: No, this was after the suicide attempt.

NORVILLE: I`m not sure the suicide equates mental illness. I think you`ve maybe gone a little too far in declaring that.

GRACE: Even fantasia tried to commit suicide with aspirin. I`m not so convinced that because he claims he tried to commit suicide that he has some long lingering mental illness. I mean, right now, he`s not being treated that we know of. He`s got custody of his daughter, Deborah Norville. I mean, that doesn`t sound like a mental illness to me. It sounds like something he cooked up.

NORVILLE: Well, I don`t know who cooked it up, the gentleman who`s the person of interest or the media. I mean, it just doesn`t sound like a suicide attempt equates with mental illness. I think that that, you know, in defense of this man who opted not to participate in this discussion and his attorney opted not to participate in this discussion, I think, it`s a little bit extreme to suggest that he may be suffering from mental illness. Maybe not in defense of cops, but I think it`s important to note look at some of the things that they`ve been asking for in the search warrants.

They have gone to Facebook, they have gone to MySpace, they have gone to Yahoo!, and they have asked all three of those internet companies to provide IP addresses, copies of e-mails, contact lists both for the missing woman and for the person of interest. Based on what is returned in those search warrants, there may be a great deal of evidence that we don`t know about right now that could lead them to a break in this case that will provide information that Miss Soto is desperately looking for and the other members of Julie Ann`s family.

GRACE: To Dr. Caryn Stark, psychologist, joining us out of New York. What about his suicide attempt? You know, Caryn, have you noticed, so many people that gone to murder, other people claim to have a suicide attempt on themselves? But it doesn`t work on them. It just works on everybody else.

DR. CARYN STARK, PSYCHOLOGIST: Well, suicide is a angry gesture, Nancy. So, it`s like anger turned inward. It wouldn`t surprise me if that anger exploded against someone else, but in answer to the question about mental illness, it would be indicative of severe depression if he tried to kill himself, but it would not indicate that he`s psychotic. Those two things have nothing to do with each other.

GRACE: Unleash the lawyers. Peter Elikann, defense attorney out of Boston, author of "Super Predators," Randy Kessler, defense attorney, Atlanta. You know, even if I agree with everything Michael Board told us tonight, joining us from WOAI, to you, Kessler, anti-anxiety meds does not a mental illness defense make. I mean, about 60 percent of America is popping anti-anxiety.

They`re on Paxil. They`re on everything. There are commercials on it on TV. My children`s favorite commercial is the big ball popping along. It`s an antidepressant. I change the channel. But long story short, just because you`re on an anti-anxiety med does not make you have a mental illness.

RANDY KESSLER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: No, it doesn`t. And really, that`s besides the whole point, Nancy. I mean, yes, in that little clip, he looked like maybe he`s a little narcissistic, like you can`t catch me is what he was saying in my ears when he was saying, you know, you can put a GPS, you can do this. But, really, even if he`s got a mental illness --

GRACE: Well, yes, wait, Randy, he was saying all that after he made the cops get a search warrant to go into his place and now totally not cooperating after he flunks a polygraph. So, you know, I don`t know how much he`s willing to let them tear his place apart.

KESSLER: Well, I`ll tell you what`s interesting to me. I`d like to know more from the grandmother about this custody battle. She says she`s seeking custody. You know, in a criminal case, obviously, they got to prove he`s guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, but they don`t have to wait that long to seek custody. And if grandma is in a custody battle, there are a lot of options open. There`s discovery in a civil case.

There are a lot of things grandma could find out about that in this civil case. And to me, I`m worried about this two-year-old child who -- if he is a murderer, if he is the perpetrator, them you know, we don`t have to wait until there`s a guilty verdict to address that. I`m surprised the courts haven`t changed that. And it means something to me that they haven`t gotten custody away. They must not have enough.

GRACE: Right now, everyone, we are quickly changing gears. We`re coming back to Julie Ann Gonzalez. But I want to tell you about an update. This girl, beautiful brown eyes, shoulder length hair, gorgeous smile, the world in front of her, 16-year-old Phylicia Barnes, straight A honor student, vanishes Christmas break, Maryland. Straight out to Jean Casarez. What`s the latest, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": The latest, Nancy, is that they found through a tip an abandoned home, searched that in the Baltimore area, and specifically, a well that was within a shed on the property. They went down 20 feet, got water out, but no sign of Phylicia Barnes. And they continue the search, but they say they don`t have physical evidence.

GRACE: Joining us right now, Anthony Guglielmi. He`s the chief of public affairs, Baltimore Police Department. Anthony, thank you for being with us again. What more can you tell us about Phylicia? We had her mother on the other night, and it is heartbreaking. she goes up to Maryland to connect with her half sister, didn`t know much about that side of the family. She`s never seen again.

VOICE OF ANTHONY GUGLIELMI, CHIEF OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, BALTIMORE POLICE DEPT.: Nancy, we`re incredibly frustrated with this case. Just no physical evidence to guide detectives. We are literally interviewing people that last saw her three, four and five times. We have every option on the table. Every resource at our disposal is being used, but we`re just coming up empty.

GRACE: Everyone, we are taking your calls on Phylicia Barnes as well. Marc Klaas, weigh in.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: We already spoken to the person responsible for her disappearance. It`s very problematic when you`re in an urbanized area and you have to look for a missing body because there are abandoned apartments, there are vacant apartments, flats, there are wells. They may have to search for this little girl one tiny little piece of real estate at a time. It`s a sad state of affairs.

GRACE: Tip line in Phylicia Barnes, 855-223-0033. There is a $4,000 award.

And tonight, also, please help us find a missing mom, Eyvonne Rosier, just 25, vanishes January 11, 2010, Pineville, Louisiana, 5`2", 110 pounds, light brown hair, hazel eyes, tattoo on her back that says Eyvonne. If you have information on this Louisiana beauty, please call 318-641-6009.

And if your loved one is missing, if you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Austin police are investigating the disappearance of a young mother whose car was found abandoned just days after her disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Julie Ann is beautiful, loved by many.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: 21-year-old Julie Ann Gonzalez was last seen by her estranged husband --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Ron de la Rosa, the family attorney for Julie Ann Gonzalez says the evidence does not bode well for de la Cruz. The warrant lists a swab of apparent blood in the laundry room, a gym membership belonging to Julie, and clothes that George appears to be wearing during a trip to Wal-Mart where he bought items with Julie`s debit card.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Gonzalez was going through a divorce, was supposed to pick up her daughter from her estranged husband`s home. He claims Gonzalez told him she was going away for a few days.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But she hasn`t been seen since.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s a person of interest because he`s obviously close to her. He`s the closest person to her and that`s where you always look.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Out to Lynn in Ohio. Hi, Lynn.

LYNN, OHIO: Hi.

GRACE: Hi, dear. What`s your question?

LYNN: I finally get to talk to you.

GRACE: I think about time you called in.

LYNN: No, I`ve been trying for three years.

GRACE: Oh my stars. OK. I`m guilty. What`s your question, love?

LYNN: Well, my question was, who has custody of the little girl? That`s already been answered. So, my question is, about the medicine --

GRACE: Yes.

LYNN: OK. Could she dropped the baby off and then went and got the baby`s medicine?

GRACE: Good question. Let`s go to her mother. Julie Ann Gonzalez`s mother, Sandra Soto is with us. Miss Soto, what can you tell us about the meds for the little baby?

SOTO: The medicine was purchased a day before, and it`s asthma medicine. So, it`s medicine that she has to have with her all the time because she has a nebulizer, and she gets treatment. So, it`s not like, you know, it was medicine that, you know, she could take off and on only as needed. It`s medicine that she has to have with her at all times.

GRACE: Miss Soto, I want to go back over what Deborah Norville asked you earlier. And let`s just take it from the beginning on. What do you know happened the day she went missing and what do you believe happened?

SOTO: I think that Julie Ann never really made it. Maybe never made it to George`s house. Or if she did, she wasn`t there for very long. George could not have done this by himself. I think that maybe he involved some other people. The car -- Julie`s car was found four blocks away from George`s house at the Walgreens parking lot. And when we told him that we found the car, the look on his face was priceless. He went white. Like he had just seen a ghost.

And I was watching him. I was looking at his reactions. And I noticed that he also had scratches on his face. All these things that happened within those, you know, first 24 hours that we reported Julie Ann missing, we would tell the police, but they just wouldn`t listen.

GRACE: Have you talked to her daughter, Layla, and asked what she saw that day? Have you gotten to speak to her?

SOTO: I see her once a week. We are in a custody battle. And she is -- she`s really smart. And the last thing that Layla told me was, I miss - - I want my Julie. I miss my Julie. And I asked her, where is she? And she used to say, she`s at work. But then this last time that I asked her, which was just last week, she said, she went far, far away. I don`t know where she is. She`s far, far away.

GRACE: Who told her that?

SOTO: I don`t know, you know? And that`s what I tell the police that concerns me. You know, from the research that I`ve done of, you know, child development, you know, the first five years of a child`s life are the most important. She is 3 years old. She is the one that is going to hurt the most. She is the one that is going to suffer the most.

GRACE: Sandra, have you talked to him? Have you talked to George de la Cruz? What does he say happened that day? What does he tell you?

SOTO: The first few days that Julie, we reported Julie Ann missing, he told me, she just said she had to go away. And I was begging him. I begged him and I begged him and I`ve never once had any angry words to exchange with George or his mother and I beg him, what happened to Julie Ann? Please, George, please try and remember, what did she say to you?

And he said, she just had to go away. She just had to go away. And I said, how do you know that, George? How did you know that? He just tells me, she`ll be back. She`ll be back. And I beg him, please, George, remember what else happened that day. If there is something that you need to tell me, I am begging you, George.

GRACE: Well, Sandra, what is all this business about him having a mental illness?

SOTO: I don`t -- well, he did admit on the Dr. Phil show and he did admit that he stopped taking his Lexapro. He -- when he tried to commit suicide in January, he was actually taking care of Layla that day. He left a message for Julie, wrote a letter to Julie, when Julie went by to pick up Layla. He said there`s a letter n the diaper bag for you, and I want you to read it later. Well, Julie only got within a few blocks of his house and she got curious, so she opened the letter. And in the letter, it said that he had taken some pills and then he was going to kill himself.

GRACE: Hold on. Let me find out about Lexapro. What is that, Caryn Stark?

STARK: It`s an antidepressant, Nancy. It has nothing to do with psychosis. It`s something that you use when somebody is feeling really depressed or you use it if somebody is feeling anxious.

GRACE: Peter Elikann, Lexapro, again, probably half of America is on Lexapro. That`s not a mental illness.

PETER ELIKANN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: That`s correct. If he`s in the process of getting divorced and upset about it, he`s depressed or anxious and he gets on some anti-anxiety, antidepressant, that is not psychotic. That is not a mental illness. So, I don`t see any kind of insanity defense or anything coming up here. It just doesn`t really rise to that level at all. It`s interesting, though, so many people who kill also are suicidal. It`s almost like life, itself, isn`t valuable. Sure, I`ll kill you, but I`ll kill myself, too. There`s a real pattern there.

GRACE: There`s a real pattern, in my opinion, of people committing murder and then painting (ph) suicide doesn`t quite work out when they try to kill themselves -- Deborah.

NORVILLE: I`m curious. What has happened to Julie Ann`s cell phone? We know that some text messages were received from her cell phone. Did the police ever locate her cell phone? Michael, maybe you know about that.

BOARD: I know they were looking into her phone records. They`ve been working with the phone company to track down her phone records. They can do pings from different cell towers. I don`t know if they have the phone, itself, though.

GRACE: That`s a good question. Sandra Soto, did they find her cell phone?

SOTO: They`ve never found the cell phone, and they never did the pings.

GRACE: What about it, Sheryl McCollum?

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: The pings should have been done. All of these things should have been done. I mean, I`ve got notes and notes here, and what concerns me now is there`s a pattern. The suicide attempt was when she was coming to pick up the baby. She goes missing when she goes to pick up the baby. That, to me, is a clear pattern. He`s losing her. So, how does he draw her back? Oh, I`m going to kill myself, and then, I`m going to kill you.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: We are talking about a missing mom, Julie Ann Gonzalez. Back to you, Sheryl McCollum, as we were going to break, you were laying out your scenario about her going missing. Explain.

MCCOLLUM: Again, she goes to his house. He`s waiting for her. Nancy, he could have easily said, hey, the baby is in the back asleep, come on in and then attacked her. The suicide attempt, again, Julie goes to him, and he puts a note in her diaper bag. All of these things are to get her attention and to draw her back to him. He`s trying to hold on to her. If he can`t, then nobody else is going to have her. How many times have we seen that, Nancy? If you`re not going to come back to me, then I will kill you.

GRACE: Out to the lines. Brittany in Georgia. Hi, Brittany.

BRITTANY, GEORGIA: Hi, Nancy. My mother and I are your biggest fans. We watch your show three times a night every night. We record them on our DVR. We kind of do our own investigation at home on all these cases.

GRACE: What do you make of this case?

BRITTANY: Well, I was kind of thinking about Ms. Gonzalez`s car at Walgreens that has a pharmacy in it, that tells me that she must have been in the Walgreens. Have they questioned the employees or check surveillance tape? And why they (INAUDIBLE) concentrate on the ex-husband? And could you post on your Facebook a way to help these people?

GRACE: What about it, Jean Casarez?

CASAREZ: Here`s a fact from the search warrant affidavit. You know the car keys to the car, they were found in the home of George de la Cruz.

GRACE: So, he`s the one that took it to Walgreens. He`s the one. Back out to the lines. Sheryl in Ohio. Hi, Sheryl.

SHERYL, OHIO: Hi, Nancy. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

SHERYL: I have two. I`m going to make them quick.

GRACE: OK.

SHERYL: When she came to the door, he says he got an alibi that the baby, you know, that he couldn`t have killed her because the baby was there. Was it possible he could have put the baby to sleep then killed her? And the second one is, why is it when he said that she told him that she was leaving town, why not the mother? A daughter always tells her mom everything.

GRACE: What do you make of it, Deborah Norville?

NORVILLE: Well, I don`t know. I think there are a lot of different scenarios, and I think, you know, what we`ve got to find out is what are the results of the internet searches, what are the results of the lab test on the trace evidence that was found both in the car and at the home? And it will be really interesting to have someone from the local police authorities here with us, but I think we`ll be hearing from them in court.

GRACE: The tip line, 512-477-3588. With us tonight, Julie Ann`s mother asking for your help. There`s a $20,000 reward.

I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END


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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:10 am

January 24, 2011
Adji Desir: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Adji-b10

Posted: 11:40 PM ET
It’s been two years since the disappearance of Adji Desir, but police have not given up hope to find the boy alive.

Police marked the two year anniversary on January 10 by knocking on doors and distributing updated flyers with the then 6-year-old’s smiling face. A large triangle image on the fliers highlights what police aim to do by building a triangle of trust between residents of the Immokalee village, Adji’s parents and law enforcement. Did someone see something when the developmentally disabled boy vanished while playing outside his grandmother’s home with friends?

Tipline: 1-800-780-TIPS
Reward: Over 30,000
Missing Since: 01/10/09
Missing From: Immokalee, FL
Classification: Missing
Age at Disappearance: 6
Height: 3 feet
Weight: 45 lbs
Eyes: Dark eyes
Hair: Black
Important to know:
-Developmentally disabled (has mind of 2-year-old)
-Non-verbal, can understand Creole and a few English words
Clothing:
-Blue shirt w/ yellow stripes
-Blue shorts w/ flamingos
-Light blue sneakers




Six-Year-Old Disabled Boy Vanishes

Aired January 25, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET



THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: God will give him back to me again. I think he will come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): It`s been two years since the disappearance of 6-year-old Adji Desir. The young boy with little verbal skills and the mental capacity of a 2-year-old turned up missing doing what his family says he loved -- to play. While his mother was at work on January 10, 2009, Adji stayed with his grandmother. He played with other children in her yard, but when it came time to go home, Adji was nowhere to be found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was one of those cases where she says she saw him, she checked on him out the window in one minute, and then the next time she looked out he was gone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Massive searches of thousands of acres of the Immokalee village community where the grandmother lives has yielded little clues to finding the developmentally disabled boy who understands a few words but does not speak.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`ve done five searches in some of these areas. This search is not over, and it`s just changing its method of operation. We searched the ground. Now we need to search information.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police have not ruled out an abduction or the possibility that Adji wandered off. Twenty-five hundred tips have been investigated and completed, but none have led to little Adji.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Don`t dismiss anything that you may think you know, because we would rather go on a hunch than not be able to follow up on it at all.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We really need to know where he`s at. We`re at a point of desperation.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police knocked on doors with updated flyers donning the smiling face of 6-year-old Adji Desir on the two-year anniversary of his disappearance. They hope the flyers will aid in achieving a triangle of trust between residents, law enforcement, and Adji`s parents to ultimately bring the boy home.

GRACE: Take a look at Adji. He has the mind of a 2-year-old little boy, he understands only Creole. He can`t speak at all. He cannot communicate verbally.

Please help us find this boy.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a 6-year-old Florida boy spends his day playing at grandmother`s while both of his parents go to work. Hours later, when his dad comes to get him, the 6-year-old boy is gone.

Tonight, where is 6-year-old little Adji?

Straight out to Rory O`Neill, Westwood One Radio.

Rory, what do we know about the search for Adji?

RORY O`NEILL, REPORTER, WESTWOOD ONE RADIO: Well, they`ve tried again, Nancy, as we`ve reached this two-year anniversary. Just a couple weeks ago, they put out a new effort to try to find the boy. Several hundred more flyers were distributed. And as the preview piece set up, they are trying to establish this triangle of trust to get the Immokalee Farm Workers community trusting of the Collier County sheriff and of the Desir family so that they can bring everyone together and hopefully find Adji.

GRACE: Let`s go over what happened that day, Rory O`Neill. Take it from the top.

O`NEILL: Well, as was mentioned earlier, Adji was just staying with his grandmother, as was pretty typical, running in and out of the house throughout the day.

She had fed him lunch as normal. And he was just back and forth inside the house as a 6-year-old boy playing. And she looked out the window one minute and didn`t see him again.

Then they really noticed he was missing once his stepfather came to pick him up around 5:00 on that Saturday afternoon, and they couldn`t find Adji. Then the Collier County sheriff was notified a couple hours later, and the search started from there.

GRACE: Weigh in, Marc Klaas.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: Well, you know, it was a similar cul-de-sac, although in a much different place, that little Samantha Runnion disappeared from. And in that case, somebody just pulled in, in a car, grabbed her and took off. And if there hadn`t been witnesses there looking, seeing what happened, that case may, too, have gone unsolved.

So I think it`s entirely possible that somebody snatched him. I also think we have to go back to the family and look to the family for the simple reason that he was a developmentally disabled child. And as I stated on a previous program, developmentally challenged children are 1.5 to 10 times more likely to be victimized, be victims of maltreatment.

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

Out to Nicole in Oregon. Hi, Nicole.

NICOLE, FROM OREGON: Hello, Nancy. It`s so nice to talk to you.

GRACE: Likewise.

NICOLE: I had a comment for you. My comment was that you`re my hero. I watch you every night. You give me a lot of strength to post everything on Facebook every day about to help find these missing children.

And my comment about this little boy which I`m trying to compose myself is, have all the family members been excluded, or have any of them had any prior criminal history with anything, from small petty things, to large things that would lead to anything in this case?

GRACE: Let`s go out to Naples, Florida.

Joining us is Sergeant Ken Becker, the Collier County Sheriff`s Office.

Sergeant, I really appreciate you coming on tonight.

What can you tell us about the family? I mean, I believe the mother and father were at work that day. The mom is a nurse, I believe, works in a nursing capacity, and the father a dishwasher. Both very hard workers, I think.

They were not even on the scene, were they?

SGT. KEN BECKER, COLLIER COUNTY SHERIFF`S OFFICE: The stepfather was there that evening, Nancy. The mother was at work.

He was there for a lot of the day because Adji wanted to go to Farm Workers Village, where his grandmother`s house, was because that`s where all his kids were at. So he was there most of the day, but he did leave for a short period of time to return back to his residence, where he got some laundry and things along those lines, and came back to do that. And then as he returned back, that`s when they realized that Adji was gone.

GRACE: Now, Sergeant, let me clarify something, a question in my own mind. When he left the premises to go get laundry, did he take Adji with him, or was Adji spotted after the stepfather left?

BECKER: No, Adji was spotted after the stepfather left. He left about the time that Adji was in eating, and then after he got done with his dinner, Adji went back out into the front yard, in the cul-de-sac area, and was playing out there with some kids for about 15 to 20 minutes, where grandma would check on him. And then when she checked on him a second time, Adji wasn`t around anywhere.

GRACE: Fifteen to 20 minutes. That`s all it took for little Adji Desir, just 6 years old, to disappear.

I`m showing footage, Sergeant Becker, of law enforcement searching through dumps, searching the water.

What have you guys done to find little Adji?

BECKER: It`s been a constant search. The night of the incident, we had a number of law enforcement officers, detectives on scene. We also had FBI members on scene.

Did an extensive search that evening in dark, going house to house in Farm Workers Village, checking all the houses, checks all the garbage cans, any vehicles, anywhere a child could hide, because early on we got information that when Adji got scared, he would tend to hide. So we were looking anywhere that a small child could possibly hide.

We had the grandmother out there on the P.A. system calling Adji, thinking that, well, maybe if he`s scared and hears his grandmother`s voice, he`ll come out. But the search went on for a week and we were never able to find him.

GRACE: Why the grandmother and not his mother?

BECKER: Well, his mother was at work. She didn`t get home until about 11:00 that evening. So it was a choice of the stepfather or the grandmother, and we felt that with the grandmother calling him, that there was a better chance that he`d come out.

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

Back to Jean Casarez, legal correspondent, "In Session."

Jean, I want to just go through the timeline one more time. Tell me how it went down that day.

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Well, it sounds like around 5:00 in the evening, the stepfather came back to the home, realized that little Adji was gone, and decided to search for a couple of hours with the family right there before they notified law enforcement around 7:00 in the evening. And that`s when the forces came in.

And Nancy, with all of the searching entities, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, FBI, by land, by air, by water, there has never been a trace of this little boy, just like he evaporated from the face of the earth.

GRACE: Back to Sergeant Ken Becker, Collier County Sheriff`s Office.

Other than the grandmother seeing him playing out in, I guess the front yard, who else was out there? Were there other children out there with him?

BECKER: Yes, there was other children that were out there. She went to them, asked where Adji was at. They said he was there just a few minutes prior and they don`t know where he went. So that`s when they started looking for him.

GRACE: So they didn`t see a car pull up? They saw nothing of that sort?

BECKER: No. They gave us no indication that any vehicles had pulled or up or anything like that.

GRACE: To Sergeant Scott Haines, sheriff`s officer, Santa Rosa County, Florida.

Sergeant, can you describe the area, the terrain there?

SGT. SCOTT HAINES, SHERIFF`S OFFICER, SANTA ROSA COUNTY, FLORIDA: The terrain down there is actually a lot different than up here. However, any large, vast area like that, when you have palmetto bushes, things of that nature, it`s so thick, you have a hard time looking from the air, you have a lot of swampy areas that are hard to get to. It`s just very treacherous and tedious terrain to cover when you`re conducting any type of a search, and it makes it very difficult for law enforcement officers to do that.

GRACE: You know, Dr. Paula Bloom, clinical psychologist, so innocent. This little 6-year-old boy was developmentally disabled. He has the mind of a 2-year-old.

He cannot communicate. He understands a few words. He understands Creole. He`s nonverbal.

Who would take this little boy that can`t even speak or understand?

DR. PAULA BLOOM, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: You know, Nancy, I`m trying to be really professional here, but I have a 6-year-old son who has speech issues, and it`s just hitting very close to home, the idea of somebody being so helpless and not being able to ask for help. One of the lessons here for people is that if you have a child who has speech problems, get him an I.D. bracelet with the basic information, because they can`t get the help if somebody wanted to give it to them.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: This little boy is just 6 years old. He cannot verbally communicate. He has the mental capacity of a 2-year-old child. He can only understand Creole, and the fear is he may actually try to hide from searchers, not understanding what`s going on.

Joining me now, a special guest, Lieutenant Tom Smith, with Special Crimes Bureau, Collier County Sheriff`s Office.

Lieutenant, thank you for being with us. Describe the search.

LT. TOM SMITH, COLLIER COUNTY SHERIFF`S OFFICE: Well, first, let me thank you, Nancy, for sharing with everyone this important information. You know, that`s the most important thing.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hello?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m going to leave a flyer here about a missing child.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Adji Desir is 6 years of age.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He was playing in the yard.

GRACE: He cannot communicate verbally.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Outside his grandmother`s home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Where she says she saw him, she checked on him out the window.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s 3 feet tall, 45 pounds --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And then the next time she looked out, he was gone.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: -- with black hair and brown eyes.

GRACE: Vanishes into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re isolating all the trash that was collected.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I feel like my life is almost over.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re searching the sexual offender database.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m sure she feels a lot of guilt.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re making sure we don`t leave any stone unturned.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Marie Neida says she believes her little Adji is still alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would give him hugs.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: More than 200 tips have come.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would kiss him. I would say, "I love you."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: None turning into significant leads for investigators.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I put my hands in the air, and I`d say, "Thank you, Jesus."

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Tonight we are focusing in, honing in on a 6-year-old little boy, Adji Desir.

Both of his parents work hard. He`s staying with his grandmother. She looks out, checks on him, he`s in her yard.

Fifteen to 20 minutes later, she checks again. He`s gone. He is developmentally disabled. He has the mind of a 2-year-old child.

He cannot speak English. He understands some words. He speaks broken Creole. He cannot communicate verbally.

Where is Adji? And what does it mean that your child is in your yard, 15 minutes pass, they`re gone?

What does that mean, Marc Klaas?

KLAAS: Well, it could mean any of a number of things. You see, there are so many scenarios that are possible in a situation like this, that it just leads law enforcement in so many different directions.

What they need to do with this case -- and I have to say, Nancy, with a difficult child, I just can`t see somebody taking this child and continuing to raise him. My suspicion is that probably, Adji is no longer with us. But law enforcement has to go in so many different directions.

There`s family to look at. There are neighbors to look at. There is the terrain, itself.

My goodness, what a difficult and rough terrain that is. Difficult even for law enforcement, not to mention a little boy.

There`s the possibility, certainly, of somebody just coming and snatching him. It`s an extremely difficult case. An extremely difficult case.

And I`ll tell you, the triangle of trust is a hugely important concept in missing person cases. And it`s beautiful in its simplicity.

It was first coined by the Laura Recovery Center in honor of their own daughter, Laura Smither (ph), who disappeared some years ago. And it simply means that law enforcement, the community, and the family all trust in each other to do the right thing.

GRACE: Let me go back to you, Sergeant Ken Becker, Collier County Sheriff`s Office.

Where exactly where both parents when Adji went missing?

I`m sorry, I can`t hear him. I`m trying to go to Sergeant Ken Becker.

Sergeant, can you hear me?

OK. We`ll get that straight.

Jean, do we know where both parents were?

CASAREZ: The mother worked as a nursing assistant in an assisted living facility. And she was working.

Now, we know the stepfather worked at a pizza parlor as a dishwasher. But according to the sergeant, it appears as though he wasn`t working that day, was at the home periodically, but had gone home, to his home, for a few minutes, to only return and find Adji gone.

GRACE: Unleash the lawyers, Kirby Clements and Raymond Giudice, both defense attorneys out of Atlanta.

Kirby Clements, you`re a former prosecutor. Where do you advise police go from here?

KIRBY CLEMENTS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, I would recommend that they actually start looking at some of the schools. Only off chance that -- you know, that a third party took him. And schools that specialize with kids with his type of disability, is there some child being educated right now that doesn`t have a birth certificate?

If we assume that someone took him, although we also have to consider the possibility that it could have been wildlife -- I wasn`t sure about what type of wildlife was in that area. Are they near alligators? Are they near some sort of big cats out there? What`s that about?

Because that also is a real concern. And if that`s the case, law enforcement is not going to find anything, sadly.

GRACE: What about it, Sergeant Ken Becker? What is the wildlife possibilities that he could have been attacked by an animal, alligator, crocodile? What can you tell us?

BECKER: Well, Farm Workers Village in Immokalee is right on the northern edge of the Everglades. So there is a lot of swampy area, there`s a lot of alligators in the area.

There were alligators in ponds around Farm Workers Village when we were doing the search. There was a panther that was hit by a vehicle just south of Farm Workers Village about a week after the search was completed. So there`s a lot of wildlife in the area.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: His name is Adji.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Adji.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Six-year-old Adji Desir --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: -- went missing playing with other kids outside his grandma`s home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Helicopters, bloodhounds.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re searching the sexual offender database.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s extremely nonverbal. He couldn`t speak up and say, "Help me."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re making sure we don`t leave any stone unturned.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s 3 feet tall, 45 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Despite a massive search, Adji never seen again.

GRACE: How far could a child with a mental capacity of a 2-year-old get on his own?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

Straight out to Lynn in Ohio. Hi, Lynn.

LYNN, FROM OHIO: Hi. How are you, Nancy?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

LYNN: Yes, I was wondering, where is his biological father at?

GRACE: Good question.

What do we know about that, Sergeant Becker? Where is the bio dad?

BECKER: The biological father is living in Haiti, Nancy.

GRACE: Excuse me? In Haiti?

BECKER: He`s living in Haiti. Yes.

GRACE: OK. Number one, that rules him out as a possibility.

And, you know, that`s not said sarcastically, because the first place you look, isn`t this true, Sergeant Becker, is at the family? The first place you would look is at the father, the bio dad, the stepfather, the mother, the grandmother. That rules him out.

BECKER: Well, it does, but we also had some leads early on that maybe somebody had assisted him in getting Adji to him, but we looked into that lead and there wasn`t any merit to that.

GRACE: Another question I`ve got about the response. Did the parents go straight to police, Rory O`Neill?

O`NEILL: They searched on their own for about two hours, Nancy, and then they notified the sheriff`s office, especially when the father came home -- the stepfather, that is -- came back to the grandmother`s home, found out that Adji wasn`t around. And then they looked for him for about two hours, and then the sheriff`s office was called.

GRACE: Jean Casarez, why?

CASAREZ: Nancy, everything I have read up until tonight, when we heard the sergeant speaking, was that the stepfather was working that day. Now we`ve heard tonight he wasn`t.

And they were cleared early on in the investigation, both the mother and the stepfather completely cleared. But I don`t know why, number one, they waited two hours to call. And number two, why the mother wasn`t informed and stayed at work until around 11:00 or so at night.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Marie Neida says she believes her little Adji is still alive. All she thinks about is having her only child back in his arms.

MARIE NEIDA, MOTHER (through translator): I would give him hugs, I would kiss him. I would say, "I love you." I`d put my hands in the air, and I`d say, "Thank you, Jesus."

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: God will give him back to me again. I think he will come home.

GRACE (voice-over): It`s been two years since the disappearance of 6- year-old Adji Desir. The young boy with little verbal skills and the mental capacity of a 2-year-old turned up missing doing what his family says he loved, to play. While his mother was at work on January 10th, 2009, Adji stayed with his grandmother. He played with other children in her yard, but when it came time to go home, Adji was nowhere to be found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was one of those cases where she says she saw him, she checked on him out the window in one minute, and then the next time she looked out, he was gone.

GRACE: Massive searches of thousands of acres of the Immokalee Village Community where the grandmother lives has yielded little clues to finding the developmentally disabled boy who understands a few words but does not speak.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`ve done five searches in some of these areas. This search is not over. And it`s just changing its method of operation. We searched the ground. Now, we need to search information.

GRACE: Police have not ruled out an abduction or the possibility that Adji wandered off. 2,500 tips have been investigated and completed, but none have led to little Adji.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Don`t dismiss anything that you may think you know because we would rather go on a hunch than not be able to follow-up on it at all. We really need to know where he`s at. We`re at a point of desperation.

GRACE: Police knocked on doors with updated flyers donning the smiling face of 6-year-old Adji Desir on the two-year anniversary of his disappearance. They hope the fliers will aid in achieving a triangle of trust between residence, law enforcement, and Adji`s parents to ultimately bring the boy home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): He has the mind of a 2-year-old little boy. He understands only Creole. He can`t speak at all. He cannot communicate verbally. Please, help us find this boy.

We`ll go straight back to Adji Desir, but first, the search resumes for a missing 4-year-old California boy, Juliani Cardenas. Jean Casarez, what`s the latest?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Nancy, we`ve got some breaking news coming in. Authorities have just retrieved a receipt for tires from the suspect in this case. The person that they believe has Juliani Cardenas. This is a receipt from April of 2009. A local tire dealer came forward and said he sold four tires to this man believed to be driving the silver Toyota corolla, and now, what they`re going to do is to take the treads from those tires to see if they can match them with the fresh tracks that were at the scene of that canal.

GRACE: Oh, dear. Oh, dear. You know what, that`s not good at all. To Marc Klaas, president and founder Klaaskids Foundation. You know the circumstances surrounding his disappearance. The little boy literally snatched out of the arms of his grandmother. What do you think, Marc?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I think it will be easy to determine if that was the car. Now, remember, he had on a donut spare tire, but I also think that the authorities need to be looking at his friends and family. This guy did not have a lot of money. He`s got to be broke now. And if he`s out there with the little boy, somebody is helping hem. The most obvious suspects would be friends or family. Now, he also, from where he was located he could have gone in myriad directions. He could have headed south to Mexico.

He could have headed to the bay area. He could have headed down to Los Angeles or he could have headed north or east on Highway 80. But I think anybody in their right mind would try to avoid the cold spell that`s going through America right now, so I think those other areas are the areas that you would want to focus on.

GRACE: Jean Casarez, take it from the beginning. This little boy, 4- year-old Juliani Cardenas snatched from his grandmother`s arms. Tell me what happened/

CASAREZ: He was taken. He was later, surveillance video showed him, I`m talking about Jose Rodriguez, buying beer shortly before he took little Juliani Cardenas. And what is critically important here is a farm worker in the area said that he saw this 2003 silver Toyota Corolla with two people in it being driven into this canal and the focus, Nancy, continues to be this canal. They continue to take cars out of it believing that that vehicle is in that water

GRACE: Well, how many vehicles have they taken out, Jean Casarez?

CASAREZ: You know, the latest report says six. I also read nine, but they are focusing on the vehicles that went in latest. But Nancy, there was a silver Lexus that was reported missing that was retrieved from that canal. And my thought was, wow, maybe that farm worker mistook the Lexus for the silver Toyota Corolla, but I don`t think the tire tracks matched or they would now discount the canal.

GRACE: Now, let`s go about -- let`s explain how you get the tire tracks. To the lawyers, Kirby Clements, Raymond Giudice, you know, for many, many years, evidence like that, tire tracks, were not allowed until they could be scientifically proven. Now, what they do is go and take the tire, match it up, if it comes into court, they make a cast, an actual cast of it to show it to a jury. How do they do it, Kirby Clements?

KIRBY CLEMENTS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, first of all, they have a crime scene technician come out to the scene. They actually pour cast, pour the plaster of Paris into the ground, and they actually get that and they have someone who is actually an expert in tire track comparison to compare those and they come into court and testify. And they do sort of short circuit us defense lawyers because they`ll say, here`s your cast, here`s your tire, find your expert if you want him and see if they can refute what we have to say.

GRACE: To Raymond Giudice, the likelihood that he would commit suicide with the little boy, by all accounts he loved the little boy. He had tried to get the little boy a couple times from school. The school had been advised not to let him go with the little boy, but as he sees the mom breaking up with him, he gets the little boy. What`s the likelihood he`s going to commit suicide to keep the boy?

RAYMOND GIUDICE, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I think it`s very low, Nancy. I agree with you there. In fact, the cases where we`ve seen children killed, whether in creeks or lake, we seem to have the parents and the drivers of the car mysteriously come out with dry clothing alleging that the car went out the road. So, I don`t think the suicide tact is going to be a good defense should he ever be found.

GRACE: To Jean Casarez, is there part of the canal they cannot search?

CASAREZ: Yes, yes, because it`s a very, very dangerous area. It`s a suction tube which suctions that water in parts and the car can get within there and divers cannot. It`s too dangerous to go into that territory.

GRACE: Jean, explain to me how he managed to get into the home. I mean, the mom and the grandmother knew he had tried to get the boy from the school. How did he get into the home to get the boy?

CASAREZ: Just walked into the garage, and that`s where they were. And he`d come early in the morning and he saw Tabitha, the mother, didn`t really say anything. She told him to get out of there. He went to the school and then went back later that afternoon and got the little boy.

GRACE: Had there been any threats before? Any suicide threats, Jean Casarez?

CASAREZ: Not that I know of. Not any suicide threats, no, but here`s the thing. The car had dark tinting on it. So, how could the farm worker see two people in the front seat as they went into the canal if you`ve got dark tint on the car?

GRACE: You know, Jean Casarez, I pray to God that you`re right. Tip line, please help us find Juliani Cardenas. Take a look at this four-year- old little boy. 209-552-2472. 209-552-2472. There is a reward in the case.

And tonight, please help us, help us find Kenny Gerald, 41 years old, vanishes December 28th, 2010. He`s diabetic. 5`5", 175 pounds, blue eyes, last seen before moving from Michigan to Dawson Springs, Kentucky, driving a red 2001 Ford F-150. If you have info, please call 270-676-3313.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to cnn.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The Collier County Sheriff`s office has received over 200 tips in the search for missing 6-year-old Adji. A task force of investigators from the local sheriff`s office, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the FBI are all assisting in the investigation into what happened to the little boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: One is hastily (ph), the second time is good, the third time you`re probably done. We`ve done five searches in some of these areas.

GRACE: The parents have totally been cleared. How are they holding up?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nancy, the family, obviously, is devastated, as any family would be. The grandmother was the one actually looking after the boy when he was playing out in the front yard.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nearly 1,500 people have searched 216 square miles for the boy who`s last seen playing with friends just outside his grandmother`s home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The search is not over, and it`s just changing its method of operation. We searched the ground. Now, we need to search information.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls about 6-year-old Adji Desir. Straight out to the lines. Gena, Missouri. Hi, Gena.

GENA, MISSOURI: Hi, Nancy. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

GENA: I`m wondering, the grandma was watching the children or the child, and I don`t understand why she didn`t have the door open or she didn`t hear that the children weren`t around any longer and why she didn`t check when she didn`t hear the kids playing any longer.

GRACE: To Sgt. Ken Becker, what exactly was her mode of checking on Adji?

SGT. KEN BECKER, COLLIER CO. SHERIFF`S OFFICE: Well, Adji, like I said, he had been playing around farm workers village with the groups of kids all day. After dinner, he was playing right in his front yard in the Cul-De-Sac with a group of kids from Farm Workers Village, and she would periodically look out the window or open the door and look out to make sure that Adji was still there.

GRACE: Sergeant, law enforcement has done so much to find this little boy. Tell us.

BECKER: Yes. I mean, we searched for a week straight for him, checking anywhere possible. We`ve continued the search trying to come up with any idea we can to generate new leads. You know, we`ve done stuff with the mailing from the national center to mail 75 million flyers out around the country hoping that somebody will see the photograph and recognize and remember seeing Adji somewhere. You know, and it`s a constant effort to think of new ways to generate new leads, try to bring Adji home.

GRACE: Back to the lines. Nicole in New York. Hi, Nicole.

NICOLE, NEW YORK: Hi. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

NICOLE: Well, I`m just wondering since there`s absolutely no lead to go on in this case, is this a cesspool area? And given the location, has anybody checked the neighboring land to see if anybody had a new recent cesspool work? Could he have sunk into the ground? Because I know it does happen. I mean, I just can`t imagine how he could just disappear and have no leads. Has that been looked at or surveyed?

GRACE: Good question. What do we know, Jean Casarez?

CASAREZ: We know there`s a lot of agriculture as we talked about, the alligators, the panthers, the warthogs that are there. Remember, this is an agricultural community. It is a lot of immigrants that are in this community. And the triangle of trust is so important because they believe someone may be a documented or undocumented immigrant that knows information but doesn`t have the trust to come forward to law enforcement.

GRACE: You know, that`s a good point. What about it, Sgt. Becker?

BECKER: It is a migrant area. You know, we, as the sheriff`s office, have been working for a number of years to convey to the community that we can be trusted and that they can trust law enforcement. But obviously, if people from different countries in communities grow up with a lack of trust for law enforcement, it`s going to take a number of years to build that trust, but we are continuing to do it in hopes that it`ll pay off in the long run.

GRACE: Kim in Florida. Hi, Kim. What`s your question, dear?

KIM, FLORIDA: Hi, Nancy. My question actually has been answered by the sergeant. Specifically, I live in a small town 30 miles from Immokalee, in a town, Everglade City, and this is the first that I`m hearing of this little boy missing, and I`m only 30 miles from there, but hearing, you know, the sergeant talk about all the flyers that have been sent out, my question is, why are there no flyers on Alligator Alley now which is really the only road from Immokalee from 29 that they can get on? I have never seen a flyer about the boy missing, and I`m just trying to understand why.

GRACE: Good question. Sgt. Ken Becker, what about Alligator Alley?

BECKER: Well, we early on in the investigation, we had flyers made up. We distributed them on the East Coast, all areas around South Florida. So, obviously, on Alligator Alley, the only things along there would be the facilities where someone can stop, the rest areas, and all those areas were posted with flyers.

GRACE: We are taking your calls live. I want to go back to Rory O`Neill with Westwood One Radio. The area there, how close is his home, his grandmother`s home, anyway, to, for instance, swampy area with possibly crocodiles or gators in it?

RORY O`NEILL, REPORTER, WESTWOOD ONE RADIO: Well, right. It is, as the sergeant mentioned a short time ago, it is just along side the Everglades. There is all sorts of wildlife that could be in that area, and that`s really one of the things that complicates this case. You were talking a few minutes ago about the California case. Look at what one piece of evidence, a tire track, can do, and what law enforcement can do with a simple tire track. In this case, they don`t even have that one kind of clue to go on.

This really is the case of a child literally disappearing. And they don`t know if he wandered off into the swamp. They don`t know if someone came along and abducted him. So, they really are -- we`re working from ground zero and have not been able to make a lot of traction except for perhaps eliminating members of the family as a suspect in the case.

GRACE: Out to the lines. Florence in Louisiana. Hi, Florence.

FLORENCE, LOUISIANA: Hello, how are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. Thank you for calling in. What`s your question?

FLORENCE: Listen, Nancy, I watch you all the time, and I`ve never heard this question asked. He is out there playing with a group of children. What is the ages of the boys or girls, if they were 10, 11 and 12? Because we`ve heard of older children hurting younger children that are disabled. And I was wondering if any of those children have been interviewed or lie detector taken.

GRACE: You know, Florence in Louisiana, that`s an excellent question. What about it, Sgt. Becker?

BECKER: The time after dinner when Adji was out playing, we were informed that the kids he was playing with was around the age of about seven to nine years old, but during the day, there were a number of kids in Farm Workers Village that were hanging around with each other and playing. Down here, we have a children`s advocacy center, so we had a child specialist come out to Immokalee with us.

We set up an interview room and we used the child specialist to interview all of the children that had any contact with Adji that day to find out what details and what information that they had in the case on Adji and different areas he had been throughout the day.

GRACE: I know, Sgt. Becker, that your force does not want to give up on Adji. What, if any, are the plans to go forward at this juncture? In the search for Adji?

BECKER: Well, like I said, it`s a continuous investigation. We`re constantly brainstorming of new ways to generate new leads like had been mentioned earlier. We came up with a triangle of trust poster to distribute through Farm Workers Village and throughout the businesses in Immokalee on the two-year anniversary hoping that people in Farm Workers Village would come forward or somebody in the Immokalee area --

GRACE: Right.

BECKER: Would come forward.

GRACE: What about it, Marc Klaas, what can they do now?

KLAAS: Well, you know, the posters that they distributed are in multiple languages. They`re in Creole, they`re in Spanish, they`re in English. They`ve also produced a video that`s gone on to the various social networking sites. And I think with 500 profiles on Facebook, alone, that can reach an awful lot of people. Hopefully, it can make a difference.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother, disappears. Their families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: In October 1983, teenage sisters, Josephine and Joyce Cogburn, were staying at the apartment of a family friend when they both vanished. Their belongings were left behind, and the sisters were never seen again. Foul play is suspected.

Jesse Ross, a sophomore at the University of Missouri, disappeared in November of 2006 while on a school trip to Chicago. His parents will not rest until they find him.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Jesse`s a very adventurous individual, just fearless, always involved in something. His school, he was involved in several organizations. He was a manager for a band called the "Dead Giveaway" who have an annual event that would provide food and music and literature and posters and so on and about missing persons families that we`ve come to know through other organizations. Jesse was majoring in communications and minoring in politics. He just had a whole world waiting for him out there for him to just kind of get what he wanted.

We always told our son, anything he wanted to do that wasn`t self- destructive, we would support him in any way we could. So, just a real potential for just about anything he wanted to do. He was very much into practical jokes. He had this very serious side. This very committed side, but he also just could not resist a practical joke. He`d get, a day of hope. I think, for us now, we just we focus ourselves more on positive (INAUDIBLE) knowing there are other people out there where we are and they`re dealing like we are each day.

They`re there for us. We`re there for them. Some have asked us if we had a message for Jesse. That is, we want him to know we won`t give up, no matter what. You know, we know positively one way or another what has happened. We will not be giving up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Thu Jan 27, 2011 5:30 pm

January 25, 2011
Ray Gricar: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 11:44 PM ET
NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Ray-gr10

The disappearance of Ray Gricar is a mystery that continues to haunt the town of Bellefonte, PA.

Just eight months away from retirement as a 20-year veteran prosecutor, Gricar vanishes after taking a day off from work to take a scenic drive. When he is not heard from for 12 hours Gricar’s girlfriend reports him missing on April 15, 2005. On the next day his red and white mini cooper is found in an antique mall parking lot – his cell phone still in the car, but his sunglasses and keys are missing. There have been many false sightings over the last five plus years, but nothing to fully draw police to one of the three theories they’ve had since day one of Ray’s disappearance – he walked away from his life, was met with foul play, or he committed suicide.

Tipline: (814) 353-2320
Missing Since: 04/15/05
Missing From: Bellefonte, PA
Classification: Missing
Age at Disappearance: 59
Height: 6 feet
Weight: 172 lbs
Eyes: Green
Hair: Graying brown hair
Clothing:
-Blue fleece jacket
-Blue jeans
-Sneakers



District Attorney Vanishes, Laptop Found in River; Prosecutor Dad Vanishes: Car Found Locked & Abandoned

Aired January 26, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PATTY FORNICOLA, GIRLFRIEND OF MISSING DAD, RAY GRICAR: There are many things about Ray that make him special, and there`s not one favorite thing. He`s just an incredibly wonderful, caring and giving person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): After 20 years on the job as district attorney of Centre County, Ray Gricar was easing into his last months before retirement. He set out on a day off from work to head for a drive along Route 192 in Pennsylvania. He told his live-in girlfriend he would not be home in time to take out the dog.

But to this day, Gricar still has not come home.

FORNICOLA: When I woke him on Friday morning, it was a typical wake-up call. You know, I woke him, and did our usual routine, and he had indicated that he thought he was going to -- he was planning to take the day off.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The next day, his MINI COOPER is found abandoned at a mall parking lot in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. No sign of forced entry.

I got a missing persons report. So I`ve got to look at everything from foul play to he left by himself. Everything`s being looked at. Everything`s being taken account of. We cannot rule out anything at this point.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Months into the search, a new lead. Gricar`s work laptop, missing its hard drive, is found in a Lewisburg river.

FORNICOLA: Just because we found the laptop, that`s good, but it doesn`t tell us anything.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The hard drive is eventually recovered along the riverbanks, the only solid clues in the search for district attorney Ray Gricar.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I want to make this statement to my father: Hi, dad. I want you to know that I love you so much and my heart aches deeply -- very deeply -- for your presence. And I want you to know that I will wait for as long as it takes.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a local prosecutor who puts the bad guys away for a living sets out on a day off, then disappears into thin air. The next day his car found abandoned in a mall parking lot, his cell phone left behind. No forced entry, no break-in, nothing stolen.

Two people report they see him in the shopping mall the day he disappears. Months later, his laptop, minus the hard drive, found flung in a Pennsylvania river. Not long after, that hard drive washes up on the river`s muddy banks.

Remember people he puts behind bars years ago just now getting out of prison. What happened to Ray Gricar?

Straight out to Jean Casarez.

Jean, what`s the latest?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Nancy, the latest is that there have been numerous suspected sightings of Ray Gricar since he vanished, since he went missing, but the minute people think they see him, he`s gone. So the question is, could this man, this elected district attorney, still be alive around the country somewhere, taken on a new identity, or is he the victim of a homicide or even a suicide?

I want to go out to Natisha Lance, NANCY GRACE producer.

Natisha, it all started on April 15, 2005. Start from the beginning. What happened that day?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, on this day, Jean, Ray Gricar wanted to take the day off from work to take a drive and unwind. He called his live-in girlfriend about 11:00 in the morning, and he told her, "I`m going to go take a drive down to the antique mall. I won`t be home in time to let the dog out at noon." She said, OK, fine.

Well, 12 hours went by, Jean, and still no Ray. He hadn`t returned home. He hadn`t made a phone call. No communication.

At 11:30 p.m. that afternoon, that evening, his girlfriend then reported him missing to police. After that point, police came to that, and a day later is when they found Ray`s MINI Cooper, red and white MINI Cooper, in the parking lot of that antique mall.

CASAREZ: All right.

David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com, joining us tonight from Erie, Pennsylvania.

So, on the 15th he takes this drive, never to be heard from again. Reported late in the evening, 11:30, by his girlfriend. This was someone he had been with for four years. They lived together.

The next day, on the 15th, this was the elected district attorney, this was the man that that community saw on television all the time. He was in newspapers all the time. He had held the position for 20 years. So an all-out search began.

David Lohr, explain what that search entailed.

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER, AOL.COM: Well, after they located his vehicle in Lewisburg, they brought in some tracking dogs. They were unable to pick up on the scent, but what was interesting about the vehicle itself, it was locked. The keys weren`t inside of it. Authorities noticed there were cigarette ashes on the passenger area. Now, that --

CASAREZ: But isn`t it true, David, that the car was locked initially?

LOHR: Yes.

CASAREZ: The keys were gone. So they couldn`t even get in that car right away.

LOHR: Yes, correct. And once they were able to get inside, they observed cigarette ashes in the passenger area, which they thought was very odd. He didn`t smoke. He didn`t like to be around people who smoked cigarettes, so that was something that was out of the ordinary inside the vehicle.

His cell phone was also located in the glove box. It had been turned off.

CASAREZ: Now, how close, David, was this car to the Susquehanna River, a very big river in Pennsylvania? And was there a search at that point in time of the river area?

LOHR: Well, they didn`t immediately search the river. The river was within about half a mile or so of where the car was found. It was not until authorities started looking into his background a little more, and they discovered that back in the mid-1990s, his brother Roy had actually disappeared in Dayton, Ohio, and he had been missing for about three or four days when some joggers running along the river there located his body.

In that case, it was ultimately ruled a suicide. So based upon the history with his brother, authorities decide to conduct a search of that river.

They took boats out there. They walked up and down. They weren`t able to find any sign of him.

CASAREZ: To Natisha Lance, NANCY GRACE producer.

On the 16th of April, the day after he went missing, people in this antique mall area, which was directly across from the dirt area where the car was found, they swore that they saw him at that mall on Saturday. Explain.

LANCE: These are just two of the sightings, Jean, that people have come across thinking that they have seen Ray Gricar. But one of these people was a restaurant owner in that mall area.

He says that he saw Ray Gricar out there. He was there for about five minutes. And then the other owner corroborated that story. He says that he saw Ray Gricar in the same area that this restaurant owner saw him in, and that he was there and they were sure, 100 percent sure, that they had seen him.

CASAREZ: All right. So a search ensues. A search by air, by land, by river. Everything. Nothing. They don`t find anything.

But Natisha Lance, what did fishermen discover months after Ray Gricar went missing?

LANCE: Three months after he went missing, Jean, fishermen unknowingly come up with a laptop computer. Now, this laptop computer is connected to Ray Gricar. This is his county-issued laptop computer that he used for work.

Now, a few months later after that, six months later, to be exact, the hard drive is discovered. Initially, when that laptop was discovered, the hard drive was missing. Six months later, the hard drive is discovered.

However, Jean, nothing is able to be taken off of that hard drive. Everything is missing.

CASAREZ: All right.

To Tom Shamshak, former police chief, private investigator, instructor at Boston University.

OK. Here`s the clincher right here. Listen to this.

Months before, when Ray Gricar was planning his retirement, excited to retire after 20 years in elected office, he had talked to his girlfriend about getting a program to erase a hard drive. He didn`t want the contents, whatever they may be, personal in nature, to go back to the county when he returned the laptop when he retired. It was also found on his computer that somebody had done research of how to fry a hard drive, how to get rid of a hard drive, how to do water damage to a notebook computer.

Tom Shamshak, put that into the mix. Do you think this man could be alive and wanted to get rid of that computer?

TOM SHAMSHAK, FMR. POLICE CHIEF: Jean, good evening.

Yes, I firmly believe that he -- he`s deliberately removed himself from the area. He could very well be alive.

What was -- why would he take the computer with him to get away to relax? That`s a question that has bothered me.

And more importantly, that you couple that with this research months earlier about how to destroy the laptop, it doesn`t bode well for, you know, authorities here. He could be anywhere in the country.

And then again, you know, we heard about the -- there were some medical issues that appeared to be emerging. His girlfriend wanted him to go and see a doctor, Jean.

CASAREZ: That`s right, because he had been tired. He was taking so many naps.

To Ben Levitan, telecommunications expert from Raleigh, North Carolina.

You are the computer expert. I`ve got so many questions for you.

But the first one is, when you`ve got a computer and you`ve got a hard drive -- remember, the computer was finally found in the river; the hard drive out of it and found on the banks, embedded in the dirt, on the side of the river.

Does a hard drive just sort of fall out of a computer?

BEN LEVITAN, TELECOMMUNICATIONS EXPERT: Absolutely not. This -- you know, we`re talking 2005. It takes a little bit of sophistication to know how to take out a hard disk.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LARA GRICAR, DAUGHTER OF RAY GRICAR: I was asked how often I spoke with my dad and communicated with him. We spoke on average three times a week. We were very close, and we had vacation time with each other probably four weeks out of the year. He would normally come and visit me twice in Seattle, or in California, when I was there previously.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Former district attorney Ray Gricar called his girlfriend on the morning of April 15, 2005 telling her he was going for a drive. Nobody has had contact with Ray since that morning.

FORNICOLA: Given the fact I had spoken with him approximately 11:30 in the morning, I was -- I expected him to be home at 5:00 when I arrived home from work.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators began searching for Ray when his girlfriend reported him missing that night. His car, a red MINI Cooper, was found abandoned at a nearby antique mall parking lot. His cell phone was still in the car, and there was no sign of forced entry.

DUANE DIXON, BELLEFONTE POLICE CHIEF: The car was locked up in a dirt parking lot and the cell phone was left in the car. And there was I believe a pack of Eclipse gum in the car. And through the processing of the car, they also found some cigarette ashes on the passenger floor.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators continued to sift through files, conduct new interviews, and looking through tips from the public, but have found no more clues that could lead them to Ray.

GRACE: Take a look, everybody. This prosecutor has been missing now.

What do you think happened?

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: This man was not only the elected district attorney of Centre County, Pennsylvania, he was a father. He had so much to live for. He was on the verge of retirement, getting a very good pension, I should say, when he did retire, and he was planning with his girlfriend that they would travel and they would just enjoy life.

I want to go out to Pat Brown, criminal profiler, joining us tonight out of Washington, D.C.

Pat, listen to this, because you look at patterns of people. That`s what you focus on in part in your career.

This man, Ray Gricar, at one point, when he was the district attorney, he took off. Nobody knew where he was from work.

He had driven from Pennsylvania to Cleveland, Ohio, where he originally was, from to watch a Cleveland Indians game. And he came back. Everyone was so worried. And he said, you know, I just needed to get away for a little while, I`m fine.

What do you make of that and now what has happened, just totally gone off the face of this earth?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, I take a look at all the behaviors going way back. I believe this man was living a life he did not want to live.

He had expressed interest in changing his life to one of those people who did drop off the face of the earth. Then he wants to get rid of his hard drive, absolutely obliterate it, which means to me there`s something on that hard drive he doesn`t want people to know.

CASAREZ: You know, Pat Brown and Marc Klaas, we begged the family to come on this show because we want to find this man.

Everybody, look at his picture. Ray Gricar, look at him. See if you have seen him.

We want to go into the sightings, but Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation, the family said they don`t want to do any more media in the search of their father, their relative, their boyfriend.

What does that say to you, when the family will not participate in this national effort to try to find him?

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: Well, obviously, everybody reacts differently to loss. And as I understand it, his daughter has had an extremely difficult time coping with the fact that her father is missing. And I can`t imagine that she wouldn`t want to bring him back.

I think two other questions that need to be asked, though, are, number one, why would anybody else besides Ray, who had researched removing his hard drive, take his hard drive out of his laptop, obliterate it, and obliterate it separately from the laptop itself? And we also have to remember, Jean, that he disappeared from a public location, yet absolutely nobody saw a crime occur.

CASAREZ: That`s right. That`s right. Some really good points, Marc Klaas.

Natisha Lance, there have been numerous suspected sightings of this man. Let`s start with the first one that came a few days after he went missing.

It was in Pennsylvania. It was in the Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, area. What did that person tell police?

LANCE: This person told police that there was a man who was dressed in a suit, he was talking about baseball -- Cleveland baseball, nonetheless -- and he was a fan of the Indians. Now, this is very interesting, because Ray Gricar was a fan of the Cleveland Indians, just like you had mentioned before, that he had taken that trip, gone, driving to go to the Cleveland Indians game.

This man says that he recognized this person to be Ray Gricar the next day after he had seen a show on disappearances. That was the first sighting.

Now, there have been other sightings, too. There was one at a Chili`s back in Texas in 2005.

This woman says that she saw who she believed to be Ray Gricar, he was sitting at a table by himself. She took photos of him with her camera.

Those photos ended up in the hands of the FBI. The FBI said they don`t match the characteristics of Ray Gricar.

However, his girlfriend was so -- she was so determined, and she had felt so strongly that this was him. However, his ex-wife and his daughter disagreed.

CASAREZ: So there was a difference of opinion. The FBI came in saying they believed it was not him.

I want to go to the attorneys, Anne Bremner, defense attorney out of Seattle; Bradford Cohen, defense attorney from Miami, Florida.

Very quickly, Anne Bremner, there was another sighting in the state of Michigan, a former police officer. And on the site -- listen to this -- a composite artist. That`s what he did for a living. And he believed he saw him in Michigan.

ANNE BREMNER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: That`s amazing. I mean, a case like this is the old saying, curiouser and curiouser. I mean, it`s just bizarre that he could still be out there. But all indications indicate he`s probably still out there.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: What kind of cases did he handle?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He handled, and still, you know, on the docket, handles several cases involving death in the community. He always handles --

GRACE: That would be murder? He handles murder cases?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes, murders. You know, shaken baby syndrome. We have one of those right now. But particularly, he did all the domestic violence cases.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

FORNICOLA: There are so many roads that we can go down, and none of them lead us anywhere.

GRACE: This prosecutor has been missing, vanished into thin air.

What do you think happened?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Former district attorney Ray Gricar called his girlfriend on the morning of April 15, 2005, telling her he was going for a drive. Nobody has had contact with Ray since that morning.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The next day his MINI Cooper is found abandoned, no sign of forced entry.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Authorities still have few clues about his disappearance. They haven`t ruled out foul play.

FORNICOLA: I want for you to come home. We will wait for as long as we need to.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

I want to go out to David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com news, joining us out of Pennsylvania.

David, is there any evidence at all that this could have been a homicide? Any cases that he had prosecuted recent to his disappearance or in the last few years that point towards somebody wanting to get him?

LOHR: Well, Jean, I had a chance to speak with his nephew, Tony Gricar, yesterday, and he said at the time of his disappearance, he had been working on a heroin bust that was actually at that time one of the largest busts in that area of Pennsylvania. But according to him, they`ve spoken to authorities about that, and they didn`t think that there was any reason why anybody involved in that case would have offed him.

CASAREZ: What about suicide since his brother had committed suicide? Was there any issue in regard to his mental health?

LOHR: Not really. I mean, according to the nephew, he never exhibited any signs. And the nephew himself actually questions his own dad`s death.

He said his father was afraid of the water, didn`t know how to swim, didn`t want anything to do with the water. So, in his mind, you know, if you`re somebody who`s afraid of fire, are you going to burn yourself to death?

So those questions have always been on his mind in regard to his father. And in regard to his uncle, he was there the week after he went missing. He stood on the bridge. He said that it was about a 25-foot drop to the water below.

He said it was shallow. The worst thing that would have happened is you would have broke your leg. He said more concerning at that point would have been hypothermia. So it seems unlikely he would have jumped into the water and drowned.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are continuing our investigation into the disappearance of attorney Ray Gricar, along with the PSP, the Pennsylvania State Police, the FBI, the local authorities, and sheriff`s department. The main purpose of the area for the search continues to be in the Lewisburg area and along the river.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

PATTY FORNICOLA, GIRLFRIEND OF MISSING DAD: There are many things about Ray that make him special, and there`s not one favorite thing. He`s just an incredibly wonderful, caring, and giving person.

GRACE (voice-over): After 20 years on the job as district attorney of Centre County, Ray Gricar was easing into his last months before retirement. He set out on a day off from work to head for a drive along route 192 in Pennsylvania. He told his live-in girlfriend he would not be home in time to take out the dog. But to this day, Gricar still has not come home.

FORNICOLA: When I woke him on Friday morning, it was a typical wake- up call. I woke him. We did our usual routine. And he had indicated that he thought he was going to -- he was planning to take the day off.

GRACE: The next day his Mini Cooper is found abandoned in a mall parking lot in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. No sign of forced entry.

DUANE DIXON, BELLEFONTE POLICE CHIEF: I got a missing persons report. So, I got a look at everything from foul play to he left by himself. Everything`s being looked at. Everything`s being taken an account of. We cannot rule out anything at this point.

GRACE: Months into the search, a new lead. Gricar`s work laptop, missing its hard drive, is found in a Lewisburg River.

FORNICOLA: Just because we found the laptop, that`s good, but it doesn`t tell us anything.

GRACE: The hard drive is eventually recovered along the river banks. The only solid clues in the search for district attorney, Ray Gricar.

LARA GRICAR, DAUGHTER OF RAY GRICAR: I want to make the statement to my father. Hi, dad. I want you to know that I love you so much and my heart aches deeply. Very deeply for your presence. And I want you to know that I will wait for as long as it takes.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights. We go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a local prosecutor who puts the bad guy away for a living sets out on a day off, then disappears into thin air. Next day, his car found abandoned in a mall parking lot, his cell phone left behind. No forced entry, no break-in, nothing stolen. Two people report they see him in the shopping mall the day he disappears. Months later his laptop, minus the hard drive, found flung in a Pennsylvania River. Not long after, that hard drive washes up on the river`s muddy banks.

Remember, people he puts behind bars years ago just now getting out of prison. What happened to Ray Gricar? Straight out to Jean Casarez. Jean, what`s the latest?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": The district attorney`s office in Centre County, Pennsylvania, which was the district attorney`s office that this man was their elected official for 20 years and a father also, they have now taken what is called facial recognition photography of what he would look like today, and they are distributing it all over the country to see if anyone by this look, someone that looks like him, has tried to get a driver`s license.

Let`s start at the beginning. Natisha Lance, back on April 15th of 2005, it appears as though Ray Gricar only made one phone call that day. Who was that phone call to?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: He made one phone call and that was to his girlfriend of four years. He called her to let her know that he wouldn`t be home in time to let the dog out because he was going for a ride down route 192 to an antique mall. Well, hours went by, 12 hours to be exact. At 11:30, he still had not returned home. She had been expecting him at 5:00 p.m. That is when she called police. The next day, Jean, is when they located his red and white Mini Cooper in the parking lot of that antique mall, and Ray Gricar has not been seen since then.

CASAREZ: But Natisha Lance, isn`t it true that in Centre County, one of the female assistant district attorneys believed that she saw him that afternoon, on Friday?

LANCE: She did. She believed that she saw him in the back of the courthouse at 3:00 p.m. She said he wasn`t in his car nor was he in his girlfriend`s car, because she also worked at the courthouse, but he was in some other vehicle. And she remembers being relieved because she was leaving work early, and she felt, well, the district attorney`s leaving work early, so I don`t feel so badly about it. However, police have now said that they looked over surveillance video, and they did not see him at the courthouse. However, she still remains convinced that she saw him that day.

CASAREZ: Pat brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler," coming to us from Washington, D.C. tonight. Here`s where I`m confused, OK? Because this was an assistant district attorney that worked with him day in and day out. Facts are her profession. She said she saw him behind the courthouse that afternoon, but law enforcement seemed to discount it at the time because he had called the girlfriend saying he was on his way to take a drive.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, that`s true. But you know, first of all, I think what he was telling his girlfriend was where she could find the car. He told her exactly where he was going and where the car would basically be found out. I believe he met somebody up there and that person was the one who brought him whatever documentation he needed, maybe a second passport, which you can buy if you prepare well enough. The things you need to leave the country and probably gave him a ride someplace where he could then sneak away.

And is it possible that that -- during that process, they returned to the courthouse because he forgot something and wanted to get it and so that person brought him there and -- I don`t know. But, I mean, they have to look at every one of those leads. But I think they need to also look outside the country as well because if he did get the second passport, he could easily be living down in the Caribbean for part of the year or all of the year. Could have just restarted someplace else. Maybe even in Europe.

CASAREZ: Yes. And that was a question I had. David Lohr, crime reporter for AOLNews.com, joining us from Pennsylvania. Did he have a valid passport? And have authorities looked in that vein? We know they looked at transportation all over the country, buses, taxis, anything he could have taken at the time, but what about a passport?

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER: My understanding is that he did have a passport. That`s something that they`ve looked into. They haven`t found anything, you know, to indicate he`d even left the country or gone anywhere.

CASAREZ: To Dr. Doug Bremner, professor of Psychiatry and Radiology, author of "Before You Take That Pill," joining us from Atlanta. How common is it for someone to just leave their life to take on a brand new identity somewhere else?

DR. DOUG BREMNER, M.D. PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY & RADIOLOGY: Well, it`s not very common, Jean, but we can`t discount that fact. I mean, if you look at everything involved in this case, we`re sort of left with that possibility. I mean, why would he go do an internet search on how to get rid of your hard drive? Most of us are trying to not destroy our hard drive and to preserve it. So, why did he want to destroy what is in essence county property? It just doesn`t make any sense.

CASAREZ: Right. To Bradford Cohen, defense attorney, out of Miami. What would be the explanation to want to get rid of the contents on your hard drive before you turn your computer in, and then low and behold, the computer and the hard drive are found on the river and on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania?

BRADFORD COHEN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I mean, it`s very obvious that he wanted to get rid of whatever was on that hard drive that was either incriminating or something he didn`t want anyone to see or something he was embarrassed about. I mean, obviously, the way that this went down, though, the thing that troubles me is there`s not a lot of planning.

If you are going to get a passport and start a whole new life, which is very difficult to do, it`s not something you can do very easily, then why would you then leave your car somewhere, dump your computer within a half mile of there? Why wouldn`t you dump the computer someplace else? Why wouldn`t you burn the computer? I mean, there`s a million ways to get rid of it, but why would you specifically think of that?

CASAREZ: And it wasn`t found for a while. Tonight, please help us find a missing young woman named Kimberly Ann Riley. She`s 19 years old. She vanished on December 23rd, 1998 from Lorain, Ohio. She is a white female, 5`1", 120 pounds, with blond hair and blue eyes. If you have any information, please call 440-204-2105.

If your loved one`s missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Tonight, a local prosecutor who puts the bad guys away for a living sets out on a day off, then disappears into thin air. Next day, his car found abandoned in a mall parking lot, his cell phone left behind. No forced entry, no break-in, nothing stolen. Two people report they see him in the shopping mall the day he disappears. Months later, his laptop minus the hard drive found flung in a Pennsylvania River. Not long after, that hard drive washes up on the river`s muddy banks. Remember people, he puts behind bars years ago just now getting out of prison. What happened to Ray Gricar?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are actively investigating the missing person report of District Attorney Ray Gricar.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re told Gricar was driving this car, a red and white Mini Cooper. Police say he was driving north on Route 192 towards Union County.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Just a nice country-type road to go for a drive, for relaxation, and that`s what we understand was taking place.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Gricar`s family says he didn`t return home and hasn`t been in touch. Police have been driving stretches of Route 192. So far, they`ve seen no signs of an accident. And state police are involved using a helicopter to search for Gricar and his vehicle.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Right now, we have no word on any type of foul play. Right now, it`s just a missing persons report.

GRACE: But your friends was a felony prosecutor. What do you think happened to him? Foul play? Has he just gone on a walkabout? What?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He would have definitely told his family, particularly, his daughter if he was just going for a trip or vacation.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Ray Gricar alive? Has he assumed another identity and is living in this country? There have been a lot of suspected sightings of him, but as soon as he`s seen, he`s gone. In his locked car was found his cell phone, but his keys, his sunglasses, and his wallet never recovered. Never found. Natisha Lance, Nancy Grace producer, there were a number of polygraphs that were taken in this case. Who took them and what were the results?

LANCE: Ray Gricar`s girlfriend took the polygraph as well as his daughter, and they both passed those polygraphs, Jean.

CASAREZ: All right. To David Lohr, crime reporter, AOLNews.com, joining us out of Pennsylvania. Here`s one thing I`m confused about because there was a massive search in the Susquehanna River and divers went in, there were aerials. People really searched that river. And months later, the laptop was found in that exact river. Who found it and where was it?

LOHR: It was two fishermen that found it. They were fishing under the bridge, and it was kind of wedged in between these pillars down there. According to police, they feel it had probably been down there for as long as the district attorney had been missing. So, it`s probably discarded that day or thereabouts.

CASAREZ: I just wonder why it wasn`t found at the time. And the hard drive was found a few months after that, right? On the banks of the river?

LOHR: Yes, that`s correct. It was found near a railroad bridge about a mile or so further down the river. A woman who was walking along the banks stumbled upon it.

CASAREZ: Natisha lance --

LOHR: Now, when I --

CASAREZ: Yes, go ahead, David.

LOHR: When I spoke with the nephew, he did say that the river changes a lot. It goes up, it goes down, the currents and things of that nature. So, that could be the reason why those items weren`t located right away.

CASAREZ: Yes, that is an explanation. Natisha lance, that hard drive possibly contained a very big key for investigators. They tried to find the contents of that hard drive. What did they try to do?

LOHR: They did. They went through great lengths to try to find the contents of that hard drive. They took it to the secret service, and they also took it to the most premier people who they could take it to crawl on track, which is a company who is able to get documents and data from the "Challenger" space shuttle when it exploded back in 2003. So, these are the people who would know what they were doing, but they were not able to get anything from this hard drive.

CASAREZ: To telecommunications expert, Ben Levitan, joining us tonight out of Raleigh, North Carolina. So, they took that hard drive to the premier institutes in this country for deciphering information. Can technology progress so at some point they could get information on that hard drive or is it a null and void issue?

VOICE OF BEN LEVITAN, TELECOMMUNICATIONS EXPERT: Well, it has progressed. In 2005, you`re looking at something that looks exactly like a DVD drive and is about as fragile as a mirror. And if you can get all the pieces together and glue it back together, you can get the files back off it, but we`re talking six months later. And these are the best people in the business. They couldn`t have gotten anything off of it.

CASAREZ: And what --

LEVITAN: That wouldn`t happen today because most of our hard drives don`t move anymore. They`re solid state.

CASAREZ: And what does it take to get in this vintage computer, 2005, a hard drive out of the computer? What does it take?

LEVITAN: Well, in 2005, you`d just have to basically read your manual. And they`re made to be removed and changed and swapped. But an average user would have to have a little bit of sophistication to know how to take their hard drive out. And this seems like it was deliberate.

CASAREZ: Right. And everybody, remember, Ray Gricar had voiced to some of his close friends that he wanted to erase the information, at least, some of it on the hard drive before he turned it back in that following December when he retired. Also, somebody had looked up on the computer, it was found later, at the office how to fry a hard drive, how to do water damage to a notebook computer. Let`s go out to the phone lines. Janet in Florida. Hi, Janet.

JANET, FLORIDA: Hi, Jean. How are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

JANET: Sure. I have a question. If Ray left willingly and he`s out somewhere living, alive, could he be charged with abandonment or face any criminal charges?

CASAREZ: Good question. Anne Bremner, defense attorney out of the state of Washington, joining us from Seattle. Any criminal charges?

ANNE BREMNER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: That`s a really tough one. I mean, it`s not a crime to disappear. But criminal impersonation, things like that that are affirmative, it could be. There could also be financial issues. We just don`t know. But somebody who would want to disappear, maybe he did, not criminal.

CASAREZ: Right. Right. I don`t see any either unless you`re talking about bank accounts and different things --

ANNE BREMNER: Exactly.

CASAREZ: Assuming someone else`s identity. Bradford Cohen, defense attorney, disagree? agree?

COHEN: I agree wholeheartedly. I mean, anyone can just walk away from whatever they`re walking away from. The only charges that could possibly stem from this are if he possibly says I`m Bob Smith instead of who he really is, and he takes on someone else`s identity. Other than that, anyone can walk away from their job and never return and not tell anyone and not do anything. That`s not criminal at all.

CASAREZ: But Dr. Doug Bremner, professor of Psychiatry and Radiology, joining us out of Atlanta, here`s -- I don`t understand, why do that? Why just not tell the person you`re with that this isn`t the life I want, retire, retire early if you need to? Why just leave?

DR. DOUG BREMNER: Well, you know, a lot of people have difficulty telling the truth. That`s not at all unusual. Maybe, you know, we could speculate on a number of things. Maybe he wasn`t happy in his relationship. Maybe there was something from his past he didn`t want to talk about. It`s not -- I`m not all that surprised that someone would deal with something that was difficult by just walking away and trying to start a new life. It seems a little bit cold in terms of his family, but --

CASAREZ: Natisha Lance, tell us about the person of Ray Gricar, because he was highly respected.

LANCE: He was so highly respected, Jean. He had been the prosecutor in this county for 20 years. He had worked on several different cases, all very high-profile cases. His colleagues all respected him. Even the defense attorneys had a huge amount of respect for him. So, he is somebody who will be greatly missed from this community.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRICAR: I spoke with my dad and communicated with him. We spoke on average three times a week. We were very close. And we had vacation time with each other probably four weeks out of the year. He`d come visit me twice in Seattle or in California when I lived there previously, and I`d come here twice.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, father, mother disappears. Their families wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Seventeen-year-old Janell Bradford went missing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in April 1999. If you have information, call the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-the-lost.

Tabitha Tuders vanished in 2003 just after she left home to walk to her school bus in Nashville, Tennessee. She was 13 at the time.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I woke her up and told her baby, it`s time for you to get up. She`s like OK, daddy, I`m getting up. I love you and I`ll see you this evening. I`ll see you too. She walked out of our house and went three more houses to the street, then one block up the road. On her way to the bus stop, somebody picked her up. I have no clue of who done it, and you know, we`re just hoping one day that the right clue will come out, and you know, we`ll be able to get her back home.

The Sunday before that, she`d went to church, and she had memorized her ten commandments, and the Cracker Barrel Association gave children $20 for remembering the ten commandments, and they`re still at home at our house. She was carrying something on her hand that morning on the way back to school. She had received her report card. It hasn`t been seen, need (ph) to be signed it, and looked at it, and she had all As, and I believe one B, and she was carrying it back to school the Tuesday morning, the next day.

We don`t consider Tabitha gone. Somebody has her out there somewhere. We just haven`t found her yet. I do not wish this on anyone. She`ll be 21, February the 15th of this year. 4`9", 4`10" or something like, probably weighs about 98 to 100 pounds, sandy hair, blue eyes. She`s full of energy. Tabitha was just -- she was just kindhearted. Tabitha -- if there`s a way to get in touch with us, she would do it. Faith and hope.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END

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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:31 pm

January 26, 2011
Amanda Jones: Nancy Grace America's Missing


Posted: 09:58 PM ET

26-year-old mother Amanda Jones has not been seen since August 14, 2005.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Jones-10

The loan processor was last seen at the Civic Center in Hillsboro, MO at the horse grounds. Amanda was allegedly meeting the man she believed to be the father of her unborn son at the center. Amanda's car was found at the center unlocked with her purse still inside. She has not been seen since that day.

Tipline: 636-797-5515
Reward: $100,000
Missing Since: 08/14/05
Missing From: Hillsboro, MO
Classification: Missing
Age at Disappearance: 26
Height: 5'8"
Weight: 225 lbs
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Blonde
Identifying Marks: Dolphin tattoo on left upper torso
Clothing:
-Pink shirt
-Floral skirt
-Pink sandals




Pregnant Woman Vanishes

Aired January 27, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

HUBERT PROPST, FATHER OF MISSING PREGNANT MOM: When you`re used to seeing her sit across the table from you, or smiling at you, joking with her, it`s hard.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Missouri mom to be Amanda Jones kissed her daughter and parents good-bye as she left a church service August 14, 2005. It was one of the last times police say they`re certain the 26-year-old was seen alive.

PROPST: That`s my baby. I love her. If she -- if he`d had left her at 2:00 in that car, she would have called.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Amanda told family she was headed to a local civics center to meet the man she believed to be the father of her unborn baby boy. The suspected father allegedly tells police he did meet Amanda at the center, then left without innocent.

SHERIFF GLENN BOYER, JEFFERSON COUNTY: He`s very important to our investigation at this point in time simply because he was the last one to speak to her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Amanda, nine months pregnant, was expected home two hours later but never showed up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is uncharacteristic behavior of this lady. She`s always been very responsible, calling parents whenever. We have some fear that this is not right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her car found left behind at the civics center. Her purse, keys and cell phone all missing. Police say investigation of her vehicle left no clues to Amanda`s whereabouts, nor did a search of the suspected father`s home.

BOYER: My greatest hope is that she simply would walk in the front door and say, hey, guess what? I`m home, I had to take a breather, and I`m back. And that would be wonderful. I think that`s what all of us really want.

GRACE: Sir, if you could speak out to Amanda right now, what would you say?

PROPST: Amanda, hang in there, honey. We`re going to find you and we`re going to bring you home, you and your baby. We`re going to bring you home and you`re going to be OK.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, vanish, disappear. Their families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. For 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a 26-year-old Missouri mom, nine months pregnant, heads to the local civic center, Jefferson County, then disappears without a trace. Police find her car, unlocked, there in the parking lot, but her car keys, her cell phone all gone.

What happened to pregnant mom Amanda Jones?

For the very latest, straight out to Jean Casarez -- Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": The latest is, Nancy, police need help. They want to find Amanda Jones, and they can`t find Amanda Jones. And the scenarios are this lady was just about to give birth to a baby.

Did someone kill her? Was there a motive for murder here? Did someone want a live baby? Did someone want a live baby to even sell?

The day started out very normally on August 14, 2005.

I want to go out to Christine Byers, who is with -- the reporter for "The St. Louis Dispatch."

Take us through the morning hours, into the afternoon, of August 14, 2005, Christine.

CHRISTINE BYERS, REPORTER, "ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH": Sure. Thanks for having me.

Basically, Amanda went, as she often did with her parents, to church that Sunday morning, and then informed her mother that she was going to be meeting with the man who she believed fathered her child at the Hillsboro Civic Center in Jefferson County, and kissed her 4-year-old daughter good- bye, and told her, "Stay with grandma. Mommy will see you in a couple of hours," and also hugged her mom good-bye and said she`d be returning in just a couple of hours.

CASAREZ: So she was going to go meet who she believed was the father of her child, because she was so close to giving birth, she wanted to talk to him about what would happen after the little boy, Hayden (ph), would be born.

I want to go to Natisha Lance.

Natisha, we want everybody to see surveillance video which is the last time we see Amanda Jones. It is from the Walgreens drugstore. That is her on August 14th.

Natisha, take us through when was this surveillance video taken? It gives us that timeline. And what happened after this?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, this was in the 12:00 hour, where Amanda went to this Walgreens store. She purchased a Dr. Pepper and she also purchased some hairspray.

Then, by 1:00 p.m., she had gone to that meeting at the civic center. Now, according to the attorney for this man by the name of Bryan Westfall, he met her at her car, they then went under a pavilion where they talked about the issues that they had at hand regarding the baby.

Then, after that point, he escorted her to the bathroom. Then later on, he escorted her back to her car. And at that point he says he went back inside the civic center because he had some work to do. He was there for about three more hours.

Later on, when he was leaving the civic center, at about 5:00 p.m., he said Amanda appeared to be on her phone, in her vehicle, but at this point her car was parked in a different location than it was before when he had walked her out there. And that, Jean, is the last time anybody saw Amanda.

CASAREZ: Ever saw Amanda.

We are taking your calls live tonight. We have some very special guests that are joining us. They can take your calls. These are the parents of Amanda Jones.

Joining us tonight, Bertha Propst, who is the mother of missing mother Amanda Jones, and Amanda`s father, Herbert Propst, joining us tonight out of St. Louis, Missouri.

Thank you so much for joining us.

I first want to ask you, Bertha, how close was your daughter to giving birth the last time you saw her?

BERTHA PROPST, MOTHER OF AMANDA JONES: She was just days away. We had just visited the hospital where she was going to give birth that Saturday before.

CASAREZ: Wow. So close.

So you go to church that morning. You all go to church. And did you know that she was going to have a meeting with who she believed was the father of the child? How did you find that out?

B. PROPST: Yes, she told us that that morning before we went to church, that she got a call from him, and that he wanted to meet her at 1:00. He was going to take her to lunch at the Fish Off the Hook in De Soto, and that they would talk.

CASAREZ: Did she say she was going to the civic center to meet him?

B. PROPST: Yes, she did.

CASAREZ: And then they would go on to lunch from there.

What happened as the hours went on in that day?

B. PROPST: With her or with us?

CASAREZ: With her. The hours went on -- and Herbert Propst, the hours went on, you didn`t hear from your daughter. Right?

B. PROPST: Right.

H. PROPST: She told us that she was going to meet him at 1:00 at the civic center. They were going to have lunch, she`d see us in a couple hours.

She didn`t call. At 3:00, I called to see where she was at. I called her house phone, her cell phone, and couldn`t get a hold of her nowhere. I called every 15 minutes because it wasn`t like her.

She said if she was going to be some place, she would be -- if she was going to be home, she was going to be home. If she`s going to call us, she`s going to call. She`s that type of girl. And we didn`t see her, hear from her again.

CASAREZ: And so what happened after that? Did you finally call authorities?

H. PROPST: We talked to Bryan about -- my wife talked to Bryan later that night, finally got a hold of him about 9:30 I think it was. And he denied different things.

Go ahead and tell her what you -- you had a conversation with him.

B. PROPST: I called him and I asked him -- I said, "Bryan, you met with my daughter today and she`s not home. I want to know where she`s at."

And he said, "I don`t know." And I asked him -- I said, "Well, did you have a fight or did she go into labor?" He said, "No, I met her at 1:00, she got a phone call. She had to go to the bathroom. And I left her about 2:00. I came back at 5:00, and she was still in her car on the phone."

CASAREZ: OK. So you had one conversation.

H. PROPST: And so he called about three times.

B. PROPST: I had two conversations with him, actually. That was the first one.

And then I called him back again about five minutes later, and I said, "Bryan, please, I need to know where my daughter`s at." And again, he tells me he didn`t know, but then he gave me a different timeline.

Then he goes and says that he met her at 1:00 and then he left her a few minutes later. And he came back again at 5:00 and she was gone.

CASAREZ: All right.

B. PROPST: So I mean, he`s told --

CASAREZ: Go ahead.

B. PROPST: -- too many stories.

CASAREZ: All right. We do want to tell everybody at this point in time there are no persons of interest in this case. This is an open case. It is a missing persons case.

We have the detective with us, Detective Scott Poe out of Jefferson County Sheriff`s Office, High Ridge, Missouri, joining us tonight.

Detective, thank you so much.

First of all, where are you with this investigation at this point?

DET. SCOTT POE, JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERIFF`S OFFICE: Well, Jean, thanks for having me.

And unfortunately, at this time we`re still actively following leads as they come in. Regularly, we report on the case in our command staff meetings. Additionally, we regularly get with other investigators that worked on it in the past, try to bounce ideas off one another, see what new directions we can go in.

We`re still hopeful that we`ll get that crucial lead that will lead us to a resolution in this case. By no means has it fallen by the wayside. It`s still a case that we actively work, and it is an active case, and we still actively pursue every lead that comes.

CASAREZ: All right. So she was going to the Hillsboro Civic Center to meet up with Bryan Westfall, who she believed was the father of her children.

Was there anyone else at that civic center, at the horse grounds that day, that established that she was there with him?

POE: Several people saw the vehicle there, and several people have seen Mr. Westfall there. However, as far as seeing the two of them together, no, ma`am.

CASAREZ: OK. Was a scent dog taken out to that parking lot area where her car was?

POE: Yes, ma`am. We`ve conducted several K-9-related searches to include scent searches, article searches, and worst-case scenario, cadaver dog searchers.

CASAREZ: So with a scent dog search, what did that show? Did it show she left via vehicle, left walking? Any results?

POE: Unfortunately, we`re actually -- we follow the trail as best we can. Nothing conclusive was determined from any of those searches I spoke of.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: You must be in so much turmoil with the baby about to come, your daughter missing.

B. PROPST: Well, I can`t describe the turmoil that I`m going through. It`s a pain that I can`t describe.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): She was nine months pregnant and reportedly going to see the man she believed was her baby`s father. That`s the last time Amanda Jones was ever seen.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: For her to disappear in this manner, especially being nine months pregnant, is highly unusual. So her disappearance is suspicious, to say the least.

H. PROPST: If he had left her at 2:00 in that car, she would have called.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A car found unlocked with her purse inside. Hillsboro Civic Center, the venue Amanda was reportedly headed to.

B. PROPST: Amanda has Graves` disease, and it`s very important that she takes her medication daily.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She needs the medicine. If she does not get it, it could hurt her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hundreds of leads come and go, but police can`t crack the case.

BOYER: If you had a family member that was nine months pregnant and went missing, and it was uncharacteristic for that family member to be missing, you`d want us to pull in every available resource and concentrate on that case as well.

GRACE: She is a mother. A child is waiting at home for her to come home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: We are taking your calls live. I`m Jean Casarez.

Amanda Jones had everything to live for. She was nine months pregnant. She was days away from giving birth. And she wanted that baby more than anything.

I want to go out to her parents who are joining us tonight. Bertha Propst and Hubert Propst, they have been kind enough to join us from St. Louis, Missouri.

Bertha, she not only wanted that child, she had a nursery that I have read about that was just ready and waiting for that little baby.

B. PROPST: Yes, she did. The nursery was beautiful. She had it all fixed up and ready for him. She even had a highchair and car seats and everything in the living room waiting for his arrival.

CASAREZ: Hubert, I want to ask you, why did your daughter believe that Westfall was the father of her child? What led her to believe that?

H. PROPST: Because it was a one-night stand and they had sex.

CASAREZ: Was it a --

H. PROPST: Plain and simple.

CASAREZ: Was it a Christmas party?

H. PROPST: It was a Christmas party. It was a Christmas party that the bank had where she was working. He was serving drinks and one thing led to another.

CASAREZ: Bertha --

H. PROPST: She wasn`t having sex with anybody else.

CASAREZ: And I believe this Christmas party was in December.

Bertha, was there any contact between them from January through August?

B. PROPST: When she contacted him to meet with him to tell him that she was pregnant, she went to the civic center there again to meet with him. She had her daughter with her, and she met with him and told him that she was pregnant. Well, at that time he offered her money to have an abortion, and her little 4-year-old stood up and said, "You`re not going to hurt my baby."

CASAREZ: And then she did not contact him --

B. PROPST: She knew what an abortion meant.

CASAREZ: -- they did not speak again until August?

B. PROPST: They did not speak again, no, until August.

CASAREZ: All right.

We`re taking your calls live.

Nicole in Louisiana.

Hi, Nicole.

NICOLE, LOUISIANA: Hi. I just wanted to know if they checked the local hospitals since she was so close to delivery, if they checked the local hospitals, as well as hospitals in other states.

CASAREZ: OK.

Detective Scott Poe from the Jefferson County Sheriff`s Department with us tonight out of High Ridge, Missouri.

Where did you search at the time since she was so close to giving birth?

POE: All the local hospitals in not just our county, but surrounding counties as well, to include St. Louis counties and St. Louis cities. Flyers with Mrs. Jones` picture were districted at those hospitals. Their security staff was made aware, along with their admission staff, for anyone fitting that description, or even closely, to please identify us immediately so we could verify their identification and ensure that it was or was not Mrs. Jones.

CASAREZ: What searches did you do at the time or in the years since she`s gone missing? And were they consent searches or did you execute any search warrants?

POE: No search warrants have been issued at this point. We have done consent searches, several consent searches.

I can tell you we`ve utilized seven different cadaver K-9 teams from three different agencies. We`ve utilized volunteers from the sheriff`s alumni volunteer echelon. We`ve used several other agencies, six Jefferson County law enforcement agencies, two state law enforcement agencies, a federal agency.

They`ve all been involved, over 20 detectives assigned to the task force that we established immediately following the missing. Eight of those members were of the St. Louis area major case squad, and several were former major case squad members. They had a collective experience of right around 210 years. So we --

(CROSSTALK)

CASAREZ: All right. Let me ask you, did you search her car?

POE: Yes, ma`am, we did.

CASAREZ: Did you search Westfall`s car or truck?

POE: Yes, ma`am, we did.

CASAREZ: Westfall`s home?

POE: Yes, ma`am.

CASAREZ: And he had a farm, is that correct?

POE: Yes, ma`am. He does.

CASAREZ: And that was searched?

POE: Yes, it was.

CASAREZ: His parent`s farm was searched?

POE: Yes, ma`am.

CASAREZ: Did you find forensically anything at all that helped you in the investigation?

POE: We found several pieces of evidence that we seized and sent our for process. However, none have yielded any evidentiary value.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): Mom Amanda Jones literally disappeared. Amanda, nine months pregnant, and already the mom to a 4- year-old girl, last seen on her way to visit the man she believed to be the baby`s father.

BOYER: The last sighting that we had according to her male friend was as he was driving off the parking lot, he saw her sitting in her car.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Here`s her car. A friend found it at the civic center in Hillsboro with the door ajar. Jones` keys, cell phone and purse were gone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She`s very pregnant. If you look at her legs, she`s not walking anywhere. Her legs are too swollen to walk anywhere.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Amanda Jones was just days away from giving birth. You know, she had named the baby Hayden (ph). That was going to be the name of the baby.

She was a loan administrator in a bank. She held down a job. She had a 4-year-old little girl from a previous marriage, but was so looking forward to this new life that was about to be born.

I want to go out to the lead detective on the case, Detective Scott Poe.

I had heard, Detective, that you actually did find some hairs and fibers in her vehicle when you searched it.

POE: Yes, ma`am, there were hairs and fibers located within the vehicle. However, a lab testing has proven it to be inconclusive at this point to anything that we can use to further our investigation.

CASAREZ: OK. Inconclusive at this point. Inconclusive through technology.

Do you still have those hairs and fibers? Because technology can advance. So maybe they could be tested.

POE: Absolutely, Jean. We retained all that information in hopes that new developments would come along in technology, as they seem to always do, and that perhaps that information, or that evidence, will, in fact, be able to yield us something positive in the future that can be used towards this case.

CASAREZ: All right.

To Jen in Utah.

Hi, Jen.

JEN, UTAH: Hi. How are you?

CASAREZ: Fine. Thank you for calling.

JEN: My heart goes out to Amanda`s family. I just have a couple of questions.

Statistics show that domestic violence is one of the number one killers in pregnant women. Does Bryan have a violent history or a criminal record?

And my second question is, was he in a relationship during this time of the pregnancy? Did he seem interested in being part of the child`s life?

CASAREZ: All right.

Very quickly, Detective Scott Poe, Bryan Westfall was a person of interest at one point. He is no longer. Law enforcement does not believe he at all is associated with this case. Did he have any type of criminal record?

POE: There was no criminal record to speak of. And let me qualify. When we say that he`s not a person of interest, we mean that in a criminal nature. He is of interest to the case, absolutely.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

H. PROPST: I hope that we can keep this going because I need to find my daughter and bring her home. I`m just hoping that somebody will come forward.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

HUBERT PROPST, FATHER OF MISSING PREGNANT MOM: When you`re used to seeing her sit across the table from you or smiling at you, joking with her, it`s hard.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missouri mom to be, Amanda Jones, kissed her daughter and parents goodbye as she left a church service August 14th, 2005. It was one of the last times police say they`re certain the 26-year- old was seen alive.

HUBERT PROPST: That`s my baby. I love her. If he`d have left her at 2:00 in that car, she would have called.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Amanda told family she was headed to a local Civic Center to meet the man she believed to be the father of her unborn baby boy. The suspected father allegedly tells police he did meet Amanda at the center then left without incident.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s important to our investigation at this point in time simply because he was the last one to speak with her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Amanda, nine months pregnant, was expected home two hours later but never showed up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is uncharacteristic behavior of this lady. She`s always been responsible, calling parents whenever. We have some fear that this is not right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her car found left behind at the Civic Center, her purse, keys and cell phone all missing. Police say investigation of her vehicle left no clues to Amanda`s whereabouts nor did a search of the suspected father`s home.

HUBERT PROPST: My greatest hope is that she simply would walk in the front door and say, hey, guess what, I`m home. I had to take a breather and I`m back. That would be wonderful. I think that`s what all of us really want.

GRACE: Sir, if you could speak out to Amanda right now, what would you say?

HUBERT PROPST: Amanda, hang in there, honey. We`re going to find you. And we`re going to bring you home, you and your baby. We`re going to bring you home. You`re going be OK.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, vanish, disappear. Their families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days for 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, a 26-year-old Missouri mom, nine months pregnant, heads to the local Civic Center, Jefferson County, then disappears without a trace. Police find her car unlocked, there in the parking lot, but her car keys, her cell phone all gone. What happened to pregnant mom, Amanda Jones? For the very latest, straight out to Jean Casarez -- Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Nancy, police are saying they desperately need help. They need help because, forensically, they have done a lot of searches and tests, but there`s nothing to show that this was a criminal act. There is nothing to implicate anyone, forensically. Natisha Lance, I want to go back to August 14th, 2005, and I want to look at the timeline here because we know that the timeline really begins from the last time we saw Amanda Jones on tape.

She was at the Walgreens. We understand that she bought a soda, and she bought hair spray. And then after that, she went to the Civic Center grounds, we believe, to meet who she thought was the father of her baby, Bryan Westfall. Take it from there.

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right. This is about 1:00, Jean. And according to his attorney, she meets him there. He goes out to the car to meet her. They then go to a pavilion so that they`re out of the sun. They`re able to talk about whatever the conversation was supposed to be about with the baby. Then after that point, she says she needs to use the restroom. He uses his keys to go into the Civic Center so that she can use the restroom.

He then takes her back to her car, and at that point, he says that she receives a phone call. He goes back into the Civic Center. He works for about three hours. And when he comes back out at 5:00 p.m., he said it appears that Amanda is on her phone, but her car is parked in a different spot. And that`s the last time she was seen.

CASAREZ: OK. So, from 1:00 to 2:00, it is believed that they had this conversation outside, right, of the Civic Center during the summer, correct?

LANCE: That`s right.

CASAREZ: All right. So, then from 2:00 to 5:00, that 3-hour span, Bryan Lee Westfall said that he went back in the civic Center and he was continuing to do work. He comes out at 5:00. He says she`s still there?

LANCE: He says she`s still there. It appears that she`s on the phone, but he doesn`t stop. He doesn`t speak to her. He goes on his way and he leaves her there in her vehicle.

CASAREZ: On the phone again. All right. To Detective Scott Poe, we hear these phone calls that were allegedly made at certain times. Did you get the phone records of Amanda Jones after she went missing to corroborate or not corroborate the witness statement of telephone calls?

VOICE OF DETECTIVE SCOTT POE, JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERIFF`S OFFICE: Yes, Jean, we sure did.

CASAREZ: Were they corroborated?

POE: We can tell you that the last call that was received by Mrs. Jones was well earlier in the day. As far as Mr. Westfall having seen her appear to be on the phone, no one can speak to that except for Mr. Westfall.

CASAREZ: So, you`re saying the last phone call she got was well earlier than around 5:00 in the evening?

POE: Yes, ma`am, it was earlier.

CASAREZ: OK.

POE: I believe she received her last incoming call at approximately 1:19 hours on that same day.

CASAREZ: 1:19 in the afternoon?

POE: Yes, ma`am.

CASAREZ: OK. To Bertha Propst, the mother of Amanda Jones, who is joining us tonight, along with Hubert Propst, the father of Amanda Jones. You know, Jen in Utah had a question that I do want to ask you, if you know. Bryan Westfall, who she believed was the father of her child, did he have a girlfriend at all? A relationship going on at that time in August of 2005?

BERTHA PROBST, MOTHER OF MISSING PREGNANT MOM: Yes, he did.

HUBERT PROBST: Yes, he did. For seven years.

BERTHA PROBST: And he`s still in that relationship with that girl.

HUBERT PROBST: Yes, he is.

CASAREZ: All right. And just to remind everyone, there are no suspects. There are no persons of interest in this case. Out to Marc Klaas --

HUBERT PROBST: Jean --

CASAREZ: Yes?

HUBERT PROBST: Could I say something?

CASAREZ: Sure, go ahead.

HUBERT PROBST: You were talking earlier about him having a criminal record. He was fired from Jefferson College for sexual harassment.

CASAREZ: All right. And we cannot substantiate that. We are not able to confirm that, but you are free to say what you believe. Detective Scott Poe, do you know anything about that to confirm or --

POE: No, ma`am. I cannot speak to that allegation.

CASAREZ: All right. To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation. You`re listening to all of this. You know, when we look at women that have gone missing when they`re pregnant, Marc, I want you to look at this before we talk. Other missing pregnant women. Look at the list here. Laci Peterson, vanished December 24th, 2002, found murdered April 14th, 2003. Lori Hacking, vanished July 19th, 2004, found murdered October 1st, 2004. Jesse Davis, vanished June 13th, 2007, found murdered June 23rd, 2007. La Toya Figueroa, vanished July 18th, 2005, found murdered August 20th, 2005. And Trudy Hall, vanished July 28th, 2010. She is still missing. Marc Klaas, your thoughts?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDER, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I`m having a hard time buying into Mr. Westfall`s story. Apparently, it has changed a couple of times. He said that she was on the phone at 5:00. Her last incoming call was at 1:19. Her father tried to reach her every 15 minutes from 3:00 on. So, I believe something happened to her between 1:19 and probably 3:00. And I don`t, for a minute, believe that this woman just upped and walked away and wanted to be by herself.

She`s had a hard time walking as I understand it. She was within just a couple of days of giving birth. She was very, very close to her family. She was looking forward to this baby. It seems to me that Mr. Westfall needs to take a polygraph exam or, hopefully, has taken a polygraph exam and cleared himself and really kind of wholes up his story a little bit, make sure it gets a little tighter so that everybody is kind of on the same page because it just seems very self-serving to me that he`s inside this building, by himself, without witnesses, for three hours. He comes out, and she`s supposedly on the phone, and he just drives away. I don`t like it. I don`t buy it.

CASAREZ: Detective Scott Poe, have there been polygraphs taken in this case?

POE: I can say in this case that there were not polygraphs, but certified voice stress analysis test given different individuals that we focused on for various reasons.

CASAREZ: Did anyone find deception indicated in those certified voice indicators?

POE: Unfortunately, Jean, this is still an ongoing investigation and pursuant to that, we are not releasing any certain information at this time with regards to what has been found as far as certified voice --

CASAREZ: Very interesting.

Tonight, please help us find a missing woman named Beth Bentley. She`s 41 years old. Vanished on may 23rd, 2010, from Centralia, Illinois. She`s a white female, 5`6" tall, 165 pounds with platinum blond hair and brown eyes. If you have any information, please call 815-338-2131.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: A 26-year-old Missouri mom, nine months pregnant, heads to the local civic center, Jefferson County, then disappears without a trace. Police find her car unlocked there in the parking lot, but her car keys, her cell phone all gone. What happened to pregnant mom, Amanda Jones?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Why she is missing, we don`t know. We`re getting to that critical hour. We need to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was nine months pregnant and reportedly going to see the man she believed was her baby`s father. That`s the last time Amanda Jones was ever seen.

GRACE: Look at this girl`s face. This lady, this 26-year-old, she is a mother, a child is waiting at home for her to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Despite over 400 leads, police say they don`t have evidence to charge anyone in her disappearance. A $100,000 reward being offered.

SHERIFF GLENN BOYER, JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERIFF: Hopefully, maybe, you know, $100,000 reward will shake that tree a little harder and somebody will come forward with some information we don`t know about now.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The family distraught, saying two lives were stolen that day.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And I`m sorry, but I don`t want my sister to die. I care a lot about her. I love her very much. And I love my nephew, and I don`t want any harm coming into any of them.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. We are joined tonight by Amanda Jones` parents, Bertha Propst and Hubert Propst, that are begging you to help them find their daughter. They want their daughter found. They want their daughter`s little baby found. She was days from giving birth. I want to talk to Bertha Propst, first of all. Amanda also had a little girl, 4 years old, I believe, when she went missing. How is she doing and where is she?

BERTHA PROPST: Hannah now is living with us. She`s 10 years old. She not only lost her mother in 2005. In 2007, her father passed away. She talks about her mother every day.

HUBERT PROPST: And her brother.

BERTHA PROPST: And her little brother. And she wanted me to say that she wants her mommy home. She wants her found and that she loves her very much.

CASAREZ: Hubert Propst, what message do you have tonight for anyone watching this show? Because somebody knows. Somebody knows something.

HUBERT PROPST: What do I have to say? I want to say to the people out there, quit being afraid of the sheriff`s office and come forward and tell the truth. Somebody knows and whoever knows, I know in my heart that the perpetrator, Bryan, is responsible for her disappearance and possibly her death and the death of her son. Anybody that knows anything about this and does not come forward is just as guilty as the guilty party. And their blood will be on your hands when you die.

CASAREZ: And there are no suspects --

HUBERT PROPST: You`ll have to answer to God for this.

CASAREZ: In this case, there are currently no persons of interest. We want to tell everybody, we wanted Bryan Westfall to come on this show. We asked him to come on this show. We tried to reach him. We tried to reach his attorney to come on this because there are, of course, two sides to every story. They did not. To Michelle in Ohio. Hi, Michelle. Good evening.

MICHELLE, OHIO: Hi, Jean. Thanks for taking my call.

CASAREZ: You`re welcome. Thank you for calling.

MICHELLE: You kind of answer part of the question, but was there any cell phone activity or pings or anything detected after the timeframe when she was last seen in the parking lot?

CASAREZ: You know, Michelle, this is brand new information that we just learned tonight. And I don`t think it has ever been released before, but the cell phone of Amanda Jones, and this comes from the lead detective on the case, that after a little bit after 1:00 in the afternoon -- Detective Scott Poe, what was the exact time was the last call made or received?

POE: I believe it was right around 1:20 hours was the last time that she had actually received the telephone call.

CASAREZ: All right. So, 1:20 in the afternoon was the last time that phone was used, but yet, there were reports from the last person to see her that 5:00, she was using her phone. Whether that was just a mistaken identity, that she was still in the parking lot but was not using the phone, we don`t know. To Marc Harrold, former officer, Atlanta Police Department, also an attorney and author "Observation of White" out of Washington, D.C., where do we go from here? Help us, Marc. What do you do now?

MARC HARROLD, ATTORNEY: Well, I know there`s been no suspect listed in this case or there`s not currently one. The one thing that strikes me about the story, and I know there`s different stories, but the one thing there`s some consistency is that he came out of the Civic Center after three hours. She was still there in a different spot. And this is your, you know, the mother of your unborn son, nine months pregnant and from what I understand he says that he just left.

He didn`t go back over and say, is everything all right? If you leave someone in a parking lot and three hours later, you come out and they`re still there, even if they`re on the phone, you might want to go over and ask if everything`s OK especially a nine month pregnant woman in what was summer. So, that`s the part of the story that doesn`t make sense to me.

It seems the Jefferson County is doing everything they can. One thing about it when I first started looking at this, you kind of think cold case after five years. Jefferson County has never let this go cold from everything we`ve heard. They`ve done absolutely everything we can and that`s promising, but it`s disappointing that they don`t have any solid leads.

CASAREZ: That`s right. Let`s go to the lawyers. Eleanor Odom, felony prosecutor death qualified out of Atlanta, Georgia. Peter Odom, defense attorney out of Atlanta. Renee Rockwell, defense attorney also out of Atlanta. First of all, Eleanor Odom, motive, I mean, what happens to a lady days before giving birth? Motive is critical here. What, in your mind, is motive?

ELEANOR ODOM, FELONY PROSECUTOR: Well, Jean, I think one thing you need to look at and you have to look at Bryan Westfall because he was the alleged father of this unborn child and maybe he didn`t want this child and that would certainly give him a motive to get rid of this beautiful, young woman. You hate to think that, but that is one thing you`ve got to look at, and you`ve got to look at things like his cell phone records as well.

CASAREZ: Renee Rockwell, defense attorney, agree, disagree?

RENEE ROCKWELL, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I agree, but let`s not discount any other person that might not have wanted her to have that baby. One thing that bothers me, Jean, is this is August in Missouri. She was not out in that parking lot sitting in that car for three hours. I`d want to know who picked the spot, who decided they were going to meet at the civic center and was he working, was this a surprise? It`s just interesting.

CASAREZ: You know, Peter Odom, one thing that just made me so angry when I just read this, as a lady, that she was sitting out in that hot sun for an hour talking with him three hours after that, but yet, she had to go to the bathroom. So, the keys were given for her to go in the civic center. Why couldn`t she sat in the civic center when they talked for an hour?

PETER ODOM, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, that`s if you buy that part of the story, Jean, and frankly, I don`t. You have a person here, Bryan Westfall, with clear motive, great motivation. You have a story that he tells that absolutely does not hang together. It doesn`t make sense and the cell phone records contradict it, and you got a three-hour time gap.

CASAREZ: All right. Psychoanalyst Bethany Marshall out of Los Angeles. Your thoughts?

BETHANY MARSHALL, PSYCHOANALYST: I have so many questions about this case. Most importantly, was he preparing to be a father? Had he broken the news to his parents and to his relatives? Had he set money aside for this child? When he called her to get together with her, was he manipulative or enticing? Did he make it sound like a date? Did he tell her not to bring the little girl so that he would have her all alone?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a mother, a father disappears. Their families left wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: In 2006, Jessica Foster disappeared in North Las Vegas. Her family believes she was forced into sex trafficking. Now, Jessica`s mom tells her story.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Jessie didn`t move to Las Vegas. Jessie was lured to Las Vegas. When she`s missing, there`s been no action on her passport or any credit cards or her bank statement, and her cell phone is no longer working. It`s almost as if she just, you know, stepped out the door and vanished off the face of the earth. She was always a tomboy when she was really young.

I even had people ask me if I had three girls and a little boy named Jessie. Before you knew it, she was almost like a beauty queen. I barely remember what it`s like to not have a missing child. I will find Jessie or I will die trying.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Jeremy Bechtel disappeared in April 2000, Sparta, Tennessee. If you have information, call 1- 800-the-lost.

Michaela Garecht, nine years old at the time was kidnapped on a sunny Saturday morning. Michaela and her best friend were returning from a local market in Hayward, California, just two blocks from home. Michaela`s mom calls the years that have followed a journey of sorrow.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They were riding scooters up to the store. I went to the front door and watched as they picked the scooters up from our driveway. And before they left Michaela turned around to me and said, I love you, mom, and I said I love you, too, Michaela, and those were the last words we ever spoke to each other. I watched as she rode her scooter down to the end of the street until she turned out of sight. And that`s the last I ever saw her.

I went into the kitchen and I was washing the breakfast dishes, and they hadn`t been gone for very long when I heard shouting outside. I heard Michaela`s dad`s voice, and he came and stuck his head in the kitchen and said, somebody snatched Michaela up at the market. One of the scooters was missing. Michaela spotted it in the parking lot next to a car, and she went to get it, and when she bent over to pick it up, a man jumped out of the car next to it, grabbed her from behind, threw her into his car and took off with her.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:38 pm

January 27, 2011
Phylicia Barnes: Nancy Grace America's Missing


Posted: 09:30 PM ET

Baltimore Police are baffled by the lack of clues leading them to the safe return of Phylicia Barnes. The 17-year-old honor student’s birthday came and went while she has been missing.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Phylic10

Last seen by a roommate moving out of her sister’s apartment, Barnes had mentioned wanting to get something to eat. She has not been seen or heard from again. Her purse and coat, gone, but her debit card remained in the home. Phylicia didn’t know the area she was visiting well enough to wander away on her own, but there are no signs of foul play. Police focus on 12 people who were of the last to see the young beauty, but so far no one has been named a suspect or person of interest.

Tipline: 1-855-223-0033
Reward: $35,000
Missing Since: 12/28/10
Missing From: Baltimore, MD
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 16
Height: 5’8”
Weight: 120 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Identifying marks: Tattoo of a rose on lower right leg
Clothing:
-Navy blue hooded pea coat
-Turquoise thermal shirt
-Blue jeans & white slippers/boots
-Carrying a caramel-colored purse




Abducted 4-Year-Old and Kidnapper Not Found in Car Pulled From Canal; Baltimore Police Continue Search for Missing 16-year-old Phylicia Barnes

Aired January 28, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on "NANCY GRACE."

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: "NANCY GRACE" show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She is so compassionate. She is so loving. Everybody takes to her. She`s just a wonderful person to know.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was a beautiful straight-A student making the honor roll at Union Academy in Monroe, North Carolina. Set to graduate early, she`d already been accepted to multiple colleges, but her family may never get the chance to see her walk across the stage in her cap and gown.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Keep her in the palm of your hand right now. Keep her safe. We all have faith that you`re going to bring her home real soon, Lord.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sixteen-year-old Phylicia Barnes spent the holiday with extended family in Baltimore, Maryland. December 28th, she tells a former roommate moving out of her sister`s apartment she plans to get a bite to eat after taking a nap on the couch. When Phylicia`s sister returns home that evening, Phylicia`s coat and purse are gone. Her cell phone goes straight to voicemail. With no contact from Phylicia, police are called and a search ensues.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Homicide is double crossing the T`s and dotting the I`s from the investigation. We`re going over every single shred of evidence that we already have. We`re re-interviewing everybody that`s already been interviewed just to make sure that we didn`t miss anything.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That search leads to other apartments, homes, vehicles, and even the draining of a well, but no sign of the honor roll student.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I found out that there was a listing of 20 different guys going in and out. She wasn`t allowed to have a boyfriend. She didn`t have men -- we didn`t have men coming in and out of our environment.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Of the 20 people Phylicia last had contact with over the 24 to 48 hours before her disappearance, police narrow in on 12.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would like to ask everybody out there to treat Phylicia Simone (ph) Barnes as if she were your daughter or loved one.

GRACE: ... people go missing in America, disappear, vanish, their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we -- 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. We go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, beautiful brown eyes, shoulder-length hair, gorgeous smile, the world in front of her, a 16-year-old beauty, straight-A honor student, visiting her sister over Christmas break, Maryland. She vanishes. Police say the last person to see her alive, her half sister`s ex-boyfriend. The search leads investigators to a local dumpster. As her 17th birthday comes and goes, tonight, where is missing girl Phylicia Barnes?

Let`s go straight out to Jean Casarez. What`s the latest, Jean?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

JEAN CASAREZ, GUEST HOST: Nancy, there are developments with Phylicia Barnes. We have got information to tell you. We need to find her.

But we have got breaking news out of California right now. The car of Jose Rodriguez, last seen with Juliani Cardenas, has been retrieved out of that river. We can tell you bodies are not in that car. Jose Rodriguez, Juliani Cardenas -- they are not in that vehicle.

I want to go out to Ellie Jostad, "NANCY GRACE" producer. This breaking news, this car just came out of the canal. You have just gotten information. What can you tell us?

ELLIE JOSTAD, "NANCY GRACE" PRODUCER: Right. We`ve just learned from the scene, as you said, no people inside that car. However, police tell us they do believe it`s possible they could still be in that canal. They plan to come back out tomorrow and do a more thorough search. They told us that the car was very badly damaged. They have no information that it`s possible that Jose Rodriguez could have fled the scene. They say they don`t believe that he has the infrastructure or the money to pull off an abduction where he could flee the scene and stay underground this long. So they do plan to keep searching that canal. But as you said, the car is out. There is no one inside that car.

CASAREZ: And this was just moments ago, that car -- we watched as that car came out of that canal. Dusk has fallen in California, but it was obvious that was a silver car.

JOSTAD: Right.

CASAREZ: To Debra Mark, anchor, Talkradio 790 KABC news talk radio. What more can you tell us?

DEBRA MARK, TALKRADIO 790 KABC: Well, apparently, two windows in that car were open. They say at least two windows were open. So again, officials are telling us that the bodies could be somewhere in the canal, and they are going to be coming back tomorrow to see what they can find.

CASAREZ: To Bill Majeski, former NYPD detective, joining us out of New York. All right, what do divers do now? Because if this car was badly damaged, if bodies are not in that car, that gives a ray of hope right there.

BILL MAJESKI, FORMER NYPD DETECTIVE: That`s correct.

CASAREZ: But how do you search an entire canal for two bodies?

MAJESKI: Systematically. I mean, they have done searches of that size before. It`s just a question of going down and doing a very -- probably something in the line of a grid search that would take place on land. And that is that they would graphically map out specific areas of the water and make sure that each section is investigated and viewed continuously.

They may do it with cameras. They`ll probably do it with divers going down there. And it`s something that has been done in the past. I`m sure they`ll be finding a lot of other debris down there. It`s probably murky waters, so it`s going to probably be...

CASAREZ: It is very murky, and it is very, very cold. I want to go out to, exclusively with us tonight, Tabitha Cardenas, the mother of little Juliani. I know you have heard the news. No one was found in that car. Your little boy was not in that car. How do you feel?

TABITHA CARDENAS, MOTHER: I`m so thankful. I just thank God, you know, that my son wasn`t in there.

CASAREZ: What message do you want to give to law enforcement now? What do you want law enforcement to do next?

CARDENAS: Well, of course, since the windows were down, they have to keep searching the canal to see if any -- they are going to find any bodies. But I mean, also, you know, they shouldn`t take their efforts off the land, you know, because he could be -- somebody could have helped him, you know? I mean, I know he didn`t have the money to pull this off, but if somebody was helping him, you know, you never know.

CASAREZ: Right. When police say that they don`t think he`d have the money to pull this off, you know, I guess I understand what they`re saying because his credit card, debit card hasn`t been used. He lost his job. But did he have friends that could help him out?

CARDENAS: Yes, probably. I don`t really know his friends, but I`m sure he could have found somebody because to me, all this seemed really premeditated.

CASAREZ: Yes, from the point of having the car doors open in your driveway to take Juliani from your mother, his grandma.

I want to go to Lakisha in Indiana. Hi, Lakisha.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. How you doing, Jean, tonight?

CASAREZ: Thank you. I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes. Unfortunately, I can`t see nothing that`s going on. My daughter, she turned the remote on the TV, and I got a brand- new TV and I don`t know how to work it and...

CASAREZ: Well, Lakisha, we will tell you. We will be our eyes and ears. There has been a recovery operation. It just came down minutes ago. We saw and watched a silver car -- you`re looking at it right there -- come out of the water. And as you see, investigators are around that car. They have determined the body of Juliani and Jose Rodriguez is not in that vehicle. It is not. They pulled that vehicle, that silver Toyota Corolla, out of 50 feet of water.

I want to go to Pat Brown, criminal profiler. What does law enforcement do next? Do they just keep searching that canal, or do they not forget the land, as Tabitha has said?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, I think Tabitha is correct. You always want to keep your options open because if the child is out there someplace, you want to go found him. But they`re going to do that grid search very, very hard. And there is one other possibility which could have happened is that when he went into the canal, he could have the child strapped into the seat, but not himself. It`s possible he could have escaped the vehicle. Or the child -- if he would be in the vehicle, actually, if the child were strapped down, but it`s much more likely that he could escape the vehicle and swim away but not the child. So theoretically, he could be out there some place. But we don`t know yet until they search and see if they find any bodies at all in there.

CASAREZ: That`s a really good point, Pat Brown. I want to go back to Tabitha, joining us tonight exclusively, the mother of Juliani. Did that vehicle have seatbelts?

CARDENAS: Yes, but from what I heard, because Jose took off so fast, so he didn`t have time to buckle him in. And I don`t think -- that was probably the last thing on his mind, to buckle him in.

CASAREZ: OK. So he was not someone that would go the extra mile and put the seatbelt on, even if he`s kidnapping the child.

CARDENAS: No.

CASAREZ: All right. I want to go to Regina...

CARDENAS: Yes. That`s correct.

CASAREZ: ... with us tonight. Regina, you`re in Indiana? Is that right?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

CASAREZ: Hi, Regina. Thanks for calling.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hello?

CASAREZ: Yes, Regina? Your question?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes. I first want to say that my prayers go out to this mother and the family, and it just breaks my heart to see this precious little boy and think that something could happen to him. And my question is, were the mother and this guy on the outs? And could he have taken this boy with him as a part of revenge? I mean, I`m trying to figure out, you know, why -- if he wanted to kill himself, why he didn`t just kill himself. Why did he include this little boy in whatever he was doing?

CASAREZ: You know, Regina, we have heard Tabitha say that -- Tabitha Cardenas joining us tonight, the mother of Juliani. You had broken up with Jose. When did you break up with him?

CARDENAS: It was over six months ago.

CASAREZ: But you still spoke with each other. You`re nine months pregnant with his child, so you still had a type of relationship, right?

CARDENAS: We were -- I mean, I was just there for Jose, you know, if he needed money, if he needed a ride. You know, I was just there to help him. But that`s all that our relationship was.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sixteen-year-old Phylicia Barnes was just getting to know her father`s side of the family, and on Christmas break, she set out for Maryland to bunk with her new relatives.

JANICE SALLIS, PHYLICIA`S MOTHER: It took a lot for me to let her come here in the first place because I`m strict and I need to know where she`s at at all times. And to send her here and she comes up missing -- oh!

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On December 28th, Phylicia`s older half-sister, says the teen left her apartment to go shopping, get something to eat and a haircut. This was at 2:30 PM, but then Phylicia never came back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There has been no contact from Ms. Barnes thus far, no phone calls, no contact to her family. It is very unlike her to not update her FaceBook page.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators suspect foul play. A south Baltimore well and the dumpster as the sister`s complex have been searched, but investigators did not find any sign of Phylicia.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. Phylicia Barnes was a high school senior, honor student, 4.0 graduate. And just this Christmas, she goes to her half-sister`s house to get to know her even better, to spend the holidays, to talk about girl things, to think about college because she was applying to go for next year. And all of a sudden, she`s gone. Absolutely gone.

I want to go to Natisha Lance, "NANCY GRACE" producer. Natisha, start from the beginning because it was right after Christmas when this happened.

NATISHA LANCE, "NANCY GRACE" PRODUCER: Right after Christmas, December 28th, Jean. Phylicia is at her half-sister`s home. The half- sister leaves for work, and Phylicia is there at the home. Apparently, there was an ex-boyfriend who was moving some things out of the home at the time. He was at the house washing clothes, according to the half-sister.

Now, at about 1:30 PM is when -- is the last time the ex-boyfriend says that he sees Phylicia. She`s on the couch. She`s falling asleep. He asked her, What are you planning to do for the day? She says, I`m going to go down to the store, get something to eat and then come back. Now, according to the half-sister, though, there was another sister who was supposed to be picking up Phylicia to go run around and do some things and spend some time together. But after that 1:30 PM point, Jean, is the last time anyone saw Phylicia and the last time anybody heard from her.

CASAREZ: To David Lohr, crime reporter, AOLNews.com. Here`s where I`m totally confused. It makes no sense to me. She was talking about getting something to eat. She was talking about getting her hair done and many different things. And she just takes a nap on the couch?

DAVID LOHR, AOLNEWS.COM: Well, that`s what the ex-boyfriend said. She was going to sleep around 1:30. She was going to get something to eat after that. Whatever happened to her, you know, after she woke up remains a mystery. We don`t know at this point. Now, he did say supposedly she was seen again around 5:10 by him, according to what the half-sister has said, but law enforcement hasn`t been able to verify that yet.

CASAREZ: All right, joining us tonight is Major Terrence McLarney. He is the commander of the homicide division of Baltimore police. Thank you so much for joining us tonight.

MAJ. TERRENCE MCLARNEY, BALTIMORE POLICE DEPARTMENT: Thank you.

CASAREZ: We want to help you in any way we can to find this beautiful high school senior. And may we say, everybody, the reward is now $35,000 to find her. Her own high school, Union Academy in North Carolina, donated today $25,000.

Major, would you say that the timeline in this case has provided the most challenge for you?

MCLARNEY: Yes. The timeline has been a challenge. We are using 1:30 PM on December 28th as the last time that we reliably -- can reliably believe that Phylicia was seen.

CASAREZ: And why do you say 1:30?

MCLARNEY: We are -- the timeframe is probably 12:30 to 1:30. We`re using 1:30 to err on the side of caution. And we don`t want to -- I don`t want to go into great detail, but we are using 1:30 PM.

CASAREZ: How many persons of interest would you say you have right now?

MCLARNEY: We -- first we have to define person of interest. And in this case, it`s anyone who was associated with Phylicia, with the apartment or with persons who were associated with Phylicia. And it is approximately a dozen people.

CASAREZ: The ex-boyfriend of Phylicia`s half-sister is the last person we believe to have seen her. Do you agree with that?

MCLARNEY: Yes.

CASAREZ: Has he gotten a lawyer?

MCLARNEY: He has reached out to the legal community, yes.

CASAREZ: Have you taken any polygraphs in this case at all, to this point?

MCLARNEY: We don`t want to get into our use of the polygraph at this time.

CASAREZ: All right. Where would you say you`re at in the investigation right now? Have you tested or are you testing anything forensically? Because I know you`ve executed a number of searches on vehicles and homes of people that were in that apartment during that time.

MCLARNEY: We`ve completed our forensic work in the apartment, and we basically have no physical evidence from that location. As you said, we`ve done search and seizure warrants in other locations and in the handful of vehicles. And that is sort of yet to be completely worked out, what we may or may not have there. We`re working the investigation in two directions.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: As far as foul play, we can`t rule that out.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Baltimore police and the FBI continue to search for missing 16-year-old Phylicia Barnes. Phylicia was last seen December 28th in Baltimore, Maryland, where she was visiting her half-sister for the holidays.

CASAREZ: What do we know about her as a person?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She`s a country girl that I protected.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every hour that passes, we get more and more concerned. We want Phylicia`s picture on every television screen across the region.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: You know, there are just some people that you meet in life or you see the picture of and you say, That person`s special. Phylicia Barnes is one of those people -- 16 years old -- she actually just turned 17, honor student, 4.0, applying for college right now. You know what she wanted to be? A psychiatrist, a doctor, an M.D. She went to go visit her half-sister over Christmas, and she was gone, absolutely vanished from the face of the earth.

Joining us tonight is her father, coming to us from Baltimore, Maryland, Russell Barnes. Thank you so much for joining us. I know you live in Atlanta. I know you are in Baltimore to help aid in this search for your daughter as ever you can. What do you think happened?

RUSSELL BARNES, PHYLICIA`S FATHER (via telephone): It`s just a mystery to us because we know that Phylicia didn`t know anyone in Baltimore but the family. Pretty much, they consisted of her siblings and the ex- boyfriend and his family. She only just communicated with them. It`s just ironic that -- just a twist that she would not go anywhere or do anything without letting her sister, Dina (ph), know.

CASAREZ: When you went to Baltimore, did you, have you spoken with this ex-boyfriend of your daughter`s that is the last person to have seen Phylicia?

BARNES: Yes. When I arrived in Baltimore, my family was hysterical. I had a lot of family members that came out of nowhere to just aid and assist with finding Phylicia. Pretty much, Dina didn`t know how much family that she had, the Barnes family that she had up in Baltimore. So people came to assist.

And that morning, when I woke up and Dina was there and the ex- boyfriend was there, I confronted all of them and I said to them, Look, I need to know who has in this home, who has any ties with Phylicia. I said to Dina, You`re a suspect. Mike (ph), you`re a suspect. Everyone`s a suspect. So the cousin had lived there. He says that -- I told him that he was a suspect, as well. So I made them write down a list of people that came through the house, those family members, cousins, with my daughter...

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She is so compassionate. She is so loving. Everybody takes to her. She`s just a wonderful person to know.

GRACE (voice-over): She was a beautiful straight-A student making the honor roll at Union Academy in Monroe, North Carolina. Set to graduate early, she`d already been accepted to multiple colleges, but her family may never get the chance to see her walk across the stage in her cap and gown.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Keep her in the palm of your hand right now. Keep her safe. We all have faith that you`re going to bring her home real soon, Lord.

GRACE: Sixteen-year-old Phylicia Barnes spent the holiday with extended family in Baltimore, Maryland. December 28th, she tells a former roommate moving out of her sister`s apartment, she plans to get a bite to eat after taking a nap on the couch. When Phylicia`s sister returns home that evening, Phylicia`s coat and purse are gone. Her cell phone goes straight to voicemail. With no contact from Phylicia, police are called and a search ensues.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Homicide is double crossing the T`s and dotting the I`s from the investigation. We`re going over every single shred of evidence that we already have or re-interviewing everybody that`s already been interviewed just to make sure that we didn`t miss anything.

GRACE: That search leads to other apartments, homes, vehicles, and even the draining of a well, but no sign of the honor roll student.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I found out that there was a listing of 20 different guys going in and out. She wasn`t allowed to have a boyfriend. She didn`t have men -- we didn`t have men coming in and out of our environment.

GRACE: Of the 20 people, Phylicia last had contact with over the 24 to 48 hours before her disappearance, police narrow in on 12.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I would like to ask everybody out there to treat Phylicia Samone Barnes as if she were your daughter or loved one.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights, we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They`re gone, but where?

Tonight, beautiful brown eyes, shoulder length hair, gorgeous smile, the world in front of her. A 16-year-old beauty, straight-A honor student visiting her sister over Christmas break, Maryland. She vanishes. Police say the last person to see her alive, her half sister`s ex-boyfriend. The search leads investigators to a local dumpster. As her 17th birthday comes and goes, tonight, where is missing girl Phylicia Barnes? Let`s go straight out to Jean Casarez. What`s the latest, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Nancy, the latest is that it has been just about a month that Phylicia Barnes has been missing. And this investigation is in high gear with local authorities, state authorities along with the FBI. But the latest information we have is that ex-boyfriend, the last person to see Phylicia alive, he has now retained an attorney.

I want to go out to Natisha Lance, producer for Nancy Grace. We`re getting more information of what have may happened that morning that Phylicia went missing. I always like to look at state of mind, and you have gotten some information that the sister, half sister of Phylicia may have gotten a correspondence from this ex-boyfriend that morning, right?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: That`s right, Jean. Actually, we received a timeline from the half sister. Let`s take a look at that timeline. She says between 10 o`clock 11 o`clock, she received a text from the ex-boyfriend. They have been broken up for some time, asking about getting back together. Now, at 11:09, she speaks to Phylicia over the phone. She asks Phylicia what`s going on. Phylicia informs her that the ex-boyfriend is at the apartment washing clothes, but she also asks Phylicia to look on Facebook to see if she sees a photo of the ex-boyfriend with another woman.

Phylicia says that she looks on the Facebook page, and she does acknowledge by seeing this photo of the other woman. Now, important here, Jean, the last text message that is received or any communication from Phylicia is at 12:23 p.m. and that is with her half sister. After that time, the half sister tries to get in contact with the ex-boyfriend at 1:04. He texts her and says that his phone has died and that he is trying to find a charger for the phone, but Phylicia has fallen asleep on the couch.

However, we are now learning from police that the last confirmation that they have of anybody seeing Phylicia is at 1:30 p.m. Now, again, he contacted the sister at 1:04 p.m. saying that Phylicia was already asleep on the couch. 1:30 p.m., last time that she has seen, according to police.

CASAREZ: All right. To David Lohr, crime reporter, AOL.com joining us from Erie, Pennsylvania tonight. Take this timeline. Here`s what I want to know. When did the ex-boyfriend leave the apartment? Because he didn`t live there. He was there washing clothes or moving his stuff out. When did he leave?

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER: Well, that`s a good question, Jean. He seems to have gone back and forth out of that apartment several times. He was supposedly moving some of his belongings in and out. We have some people who have came to the apartment around 3:00, 3:30. They said they didn`t see anybody there. So you know, when exactly he was last there we don`t know at this point. He claims to be there around 5:00. The sister got home from work around 6:00. So, you know, the timeline`s still sketchy at this point.

CASAREZ: Russell Barnes, father of Phylicia Barnes joining us tonight from Baltimore, Maryland. Very quickly, when did that ex-boyfriend come back to the apartment? When did he leave?

VOICE OF RUSSELL BARNES, DAD OF MISSING TEEN STUDENT, PHYLICIA BARNES: Well, when I arrived in Baltimore, everyone was still there. My family was tired and exhausted, and a young gentleman told me that he left around 1:30, and he locked the door behind him. And then he told me personally, because my family was under (ph) investigation. And he told us all that he left Phylicia asleep on the couch, and he was also saying that he asked Phylicia what she was going to do, and Phylicia mumbled something like, well, I`m going to get up and get something to eat.

We know Phylicia is the person that would communicate with Dina if she would go anywhere. If she was getting anything to eat, she would have called and told Dina I`m getting something to eat or she would have said I`m on my way back. So, that timeline to us as a family, the Barnes family, just was not, it was just shaky with us.

CASAREZ: So, your gut is telling you that that is not the Phylicia that you know that would operate and behave in that way?

To tonight`s case alert, the search for a 12-year-old Texas girl. Alantria Jones has been missing since Monday from the Houston Area. Her mother believes the 12-year-old could be in danger. Her disappearance may be linked to a phone chat line. Now, take a look at this missing girl. Alantria, she`s 5`4", 178 pounds with black hair and brown eyes. If you have any information, please call the Houston police at 713-731-5223.

And also tonight, please help us find Norman Lewis. He is 64 years old, and he vanished on January 4th, 2011 from Horn Lake, Mississippi. He is 5`8", between 155 and 195 pounds with salt and pepper hair and brown eyes. If you have any information, please call, look at this man, look at this picture, call 662-429-1470.

If your loved one`s missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Beautiful brown eyes, shoulder length hair, gorgeous smile, the world in front of her. A 16-year-old beauty, straight-A honor student, visiting her sister over Christmas break, Maryland. She vanishes. Police say the last person to see her alive, her half sister`s ex-boyfriend. The search leads investigators to a local dumpster. As her 17th birthday comes and goes, tonight, where is missing girl Phylicia Barnes?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE (voice-over): Just weeks ago on December 28th, Phylicia`s half sister says the teen vanished after leaving her apartment to do some shopping. And since then, there`s been no trace of the beautiful straight- A student.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are enormously concerned. This is unlike any missing person case that we`ve had. And we`ve shown every law enforcement resource, every tool, trinket, widget that we have in an effort to bring Phylicia home alive.

GRACE: Shocking details emerge right here on our show from Phylicia`s mother who says 20 different guys were in and out of the apartment during Phylicia`s visit.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I found out that there was a listing of 20 different guys going in and out. I found out through her sister when I approached her that since she`s been here, you`ve allowed her to drink alcohol, you`ve allowed her to smoke marijuana.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Homicide is double crossing the T`s and dotting the I`s from the investigation, going over every single shred of evidence just to make sure that we didn`t miss anything.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. This 16-year-old honor student vanished without a trace. And listen to this. They brought scent dogs to the apartment right after she this appeared. The scent dog did not find that she walked to the nearby food court or walked to a store. The scent dog showed that she left the property probably in a vehicle.

I want to go out to Major Terrance McLarney who`s joining us tonight from the Baltimore Police Department. He is the commander of homicide division. Forensically, and tell me if I`m correct here, you have not found anything that shows she was the victim of a violent crime?

MAJOR TERRENCE MCLARNEY, COMMANDER OF HOMICIDE DIVISION, BALTIMORE, PD: we have not.

CASAREZ: So, where does that take your investigation now?

MCLARNEY: We continue to work this as an abduction, but we are cognizant that in the worst-case scenario, we have foul play. So, we`re moving cautiously, making sure we don`t miss anything along those lines. But what we`d like to ask is for people to focus on the date of December 28th. It was a Tuesday. It`s the Tuesday following Christmas. And please focus on that afternoon and evening. Everyone, of course, is trying to help with spottings of Phylicia, but we would like people to look back to that Tuesday afternoon and evening.

CASAREZ: What can you say to someone that does know something? Because somebody knows something, and they`re too scared to come forward.

MCLARNEY: It`s time to come and tell us what you know. It`s time.

CASAREZ: All right. And they can just make that call.

MCLARNEY: Yes.

CASAREZ: All right. We got live calls tonight. We are taking your calls. Coco in Virginia. Hi, Coco.

COCO, VIRGINIA: Hey, how are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

COCO: I`m just so miserable. I just want to say that to the family, I`m so, so disgusted with what happened here. I just -- my question is, I`m in Virginia, but I`m from New Jersey, from the city. I`m wondering, where are the cameras at? I know they had to have cameras around to see her leave somewhere if she walked off, past the stores. The stores have cameras.

CASAREZ: To Major Terrance McLarney, commander of the homicide division of Baltimore Police Department, I don`t believe there were any surveillance cameras at that apartment complex or at least operational, right?

MCLARNEY: What the apartment complex had were very specific to different work areas and not the parking lot area. We, of course, have looked at lots and lots of camera footage from nearby businesses, the cameras that the city of Baltimore does have on the major thoroughfares. We have looked at a lot of camera footage, and we do not see Phylicia.

CASAREZ: If someone wants to call in an anonymous tip and not give their name, you accept that, correct?

MCLARNEY: Certainly. Yes.

CASAREZ: All right. To Russell Barnes, father of Phylicia Barnes, who has gone to Baltimore, Maryland, to aid in this search. You know, Mr. Barnes, we do want to tell everybody, I know you helped put together $10,000 for reward and Union Academy, which is the high school of Phylicia. She is a senior this year. Today, they announced that their scholarship fund for this year is going to go to help find Phylicia. $25,000. So, that`s a total of $35,000 in reward money for the people that can help give the information of where your daughter is. Do you think she is alive?

BARNES: Yes, Jean. We are faith based. We believe in Christ, and we believe that she is still alive.

CASAREZ: Why? Why do you think she`s still alive?

BARNES: Because we are a strong individual. My family is strong. And we just do not want to give up on anything like this. And people are just outpouring. We want to thank everyone for their concerns and their care and thoughts and prayers. The Union Academy. And everyone who has donated to this reward fund. We just know that Phylicia`s still alive. Someone just has her, and we shook them up pretty much in the city.

Even when before the Baltimore City Police probably came onboard strong as they`ve been, and I commend them. But as a family, 400-base strong in the Baltimore and the East Coast area, we had to let people know that you took the wrong crystal child. A Barnes child. And our focus is finding Phylicia. And we believe we`re going to find her alive.

CASAREZ: To Kim in Ohio. Good evening, Kim.

KIM, OHIO: Good evening.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

KIM: Thank you. I was wondering about the lie detector test. Is it possible he lawyered up because he failed that test?

CASAREZ: Well, let`s go to the lawyers. Christopher Amolsch, defense attorney joining us tonight out of Washington, D.C. and Meg Strickler, international law attorney joining us out of Atlanta. First, Christopher Amolsch, that`s interesting. You know, I asked Maj. Terrance McLarney with us tonight, head of the homicide division, if any polygraphs had been taken, and he did not want to compromise the investigation, would not tell us. What do you think? Do you think some were taken and deception was indicated or now that someone has lawyered up, they`re not going to do it?

CHRISTOPHER AMOLSCH, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I think anybody who`s lawyered up is smart. I think the Jonbenet Ramsey case has showed us that the best thing you can do is get a lawyer instead of talking to the police in these kinds of cases. As for the lie detector test, the reason they`re not valuable is because you can be telling the truth and fail them, not because you can lie and pass them. So, I wouldn`t put much talk either walk in a polygraph --

CASAREZ: But Meg Strickler, why do you have to get a lawyer? Why don`t you go out and pass the fliers to try to find her?

MEG STRICKLER, INTERNATIONAL LAW ATTORNEY: Oh, that`s a bad question to ask me. I`ve been in the criminal defense field way too long. I can get on my soapbox. Never talk to law enforcement without some help. And with respect to the polygraph, a lot of times here in Georgia, for example, GBI is very strained. They don`t have the funds. Their product is not as good as a private polygraph. And if he lawyered up, he should have taken a private polygraph.

CASAREZ: All right. Tonight, "CNN Heroes."

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

(SPEAKING DIFFERENT LANGUAGE)

YUVAL ROTH, COMMUNITY CRUSADER: In Palestine, health care is very expensive. It`s not accessible. It`s a big difference between the life here and one minute away. My name is Yuval Roth. We transport sick Palestinian from their occupied territories into the Israeli hospitals.

If they should take a taxi, it will cost them a lot of money. They can`t afford it. My brother, Udi, he was murdered by Hamas leaders. That caused me to do something. Not in terms of revenge, but to look for a way for a reconciliation and peace. Right now, we are about 200 volunteers, and we transport from Israeli side of the checkpoint at least five days a week. It`s a very exciting moment when you see improvement.

It fills me with a lot of happiness. The price of the conflict is a lot more than the price of making peace. Regardless of political or religious, I think that we are all human beings.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother disappears. Their families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Joe Helt was with friends when their car got stuck in the snow in the middle of the night in January of 1987. Joe went for help at a village five miles down the road. He was never seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: All year long, there`s a lot of hikers up there and never anything found. Not one piece of one article of clothing, not a shoe, not anything. Joe was 17 years old at the time that he disappeared. A funny, outgoing, pretty happy, you know, normal teenage boy. He loved music. He was a really good artist. He loved to draw. He was, you know, he was a pretty good kid, too. He was more like a little brother to me than a nephew. I don`t believe that he just disappeared. I believe somebody knows what happened. We just want closure.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: CELINA MAYS was 12 years old and 9 months pregnant when she was last seen in 1996 as she went to bed at her aunt`s home. Her purse, prenatal vitamins, and other belongings were left behind. If you have any information, call 1-800-the-lost.

Eleven-year-old Mark Himebaugh vanished from his home in 1991 after he went to look at a fire in a nearby marsh.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He saw smoke, so he went to look at it because he was a curious George like any 11-year-old would be. There were sightings. He was seen walking down to the park. It`s on the main street where the fire was. After the search, his sneaker was found on the Delaware Bay. He loved nature. He loved bugs. He would catch a bumblebee in the house, in a cup, and take it outside and let it go. He brought a possum home that he found on the side of the road one day and wanted us to bury it in the backyard.

Because Elizabeth Smart was found and because Jaycee Dugard was found, I have hope. I have a little tattoo of him on my heart, and it`s got his name. It`s a heart with his name over it. And that way, I can keep him forever in my heart.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern, and until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END


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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:56 am

Brittanee Drexel: Nancy Grace America's Missing

Aired January 31, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

Posted: 01:12 PM ET

For two years police have been looking for clues to find a beautiful teenage girl who disappeared during a spring break trip to Myrtle Beach.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Britta10

Brittanee Drexel was last seen on April 25, 2009. She went for a walk around 8pm and was never seen again. Over the weekend the second largest search for Brittanee was launched with the help of 200 trained volunteers from the C.U.E Center for Missing Persons. Volunteers covered heavily wooded areas with ATV’s horses, dogs and by foot. Drexel’s parents remain optimistic – hoping for the best.

Tipline: 843-918-1382
Missing: April 25, 2009
From: Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
Classification: Missing Endangered
Age at disappearance: 17
Hair: Brown w/blond highlights
Eyes: Blue
Height: 5 feet
Weight: 103 lbs
Characteristics: Pierced ears & nose
Clothing:
-White, black, teal & gray top
-Black shorts
-White flip-flops




America`s Missing: Brittanee Drexel

Aired January 31, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, CNN HOST: Vanished into thin air. Look for her. We just need to find her. So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads. Missing. Missing person. It`s our duty to find her. Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on "Nancy Grace."

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: "Nancy Grace" show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days. 50 nights. Just don`t give up.

DAWN DREXEL, MOTHER OF MISSING GIRL: She said, oh, I`m just going to hang out with my friend, we`re going to watch a movie and I told her, I said, well, please give me a call later and she said, OK, mom, and then, you know, I told her, I said, I love you, Brittanee. She says, I love you, mom. And then we hung up the phone.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Just one year she was set to graduate high school, had a bright future ahead. Seventeen-year-old Brittanee Drexel headed down to world famous Myrtle Beach to enjoy spring break with her friends, but Brittanee never came back.

DREXEL: If you`re out there, please call us, contact us, we love you. We miss you. We want you to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On the night of April 25th, friends say she left the Bar Harbor Hotel to meet friends at another nearby hotel, the Blue Water Resort. Surveillance footage shows Brittanee arriving at the resort and leaving about 10 minutes later. That was the last time anyone saw Brittanee.

DREXEL: Something`s very, very wrong. It`s not like my daughter to not call, even if it was a friend. We were not arguing. She would have called me. She would have called her boyfriend. She wouldn`t have left her clothes at the hotel.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now, suddenly a huge search effort unleashed in the area where authorities believe Brittanee`s cell phone gave off its last ping. The heavily wooded area being searched by multiple agencies using ATVs, dogs and horses.

DREXEL: The searches are very physically and emotionally draining. Enough is enough. Someone needs to come forward. Someone needs to tell them what they know.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sissy, just please come home. I really want you to come home. I miss her saying sis to me all the time. I miss her being there after school.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One, two, three.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I miss her being just around and I just want her back. She`s -- I just want my sister.

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America. They disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping but never forgetting. And neither have we, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. Gone, but where?

Tonight a 17-year-old high school beauty, a model student, soccer player, vanishes into thin air, spring break, Myrtle Beach. Last seen, leaving one of the resort hotels just steps away from the world famous beach. Grainy surveillance video emerges picturing her leaving the hotel. But the trail goes cold almost immediately.

So what happened to Brittanee? Now, two years later, hundreds converge on a heavily wooded area to search on foot. Horses, ATVs, dogs. Why? This is the area where Brittanee`s cell phone gave its last known signal. Is there a break in the case? To Jean Casarez, legal correspondent, "In Session". Hi, Jean, why the search, the recent search?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT: You know, they`re not really saying, but Nancy, it was a massive search over the weekend by land, by air, by ATV, by dogs, and it was in Georgetown County where the last pinging of her phone 24 hours after she was reported missing was found, but as far as we know at this point nothing was found over the weekend.

GRACE: You know what, Jean, back me up. Take me all the way back to the very beginning when Drexel goes missing.

CASAREZ: Well, it was April 2009. She wanted to go to Myrtle Beach. And her mother said, no, you can`t go. She lived in Rochester, New York, so she told her mother she was going to go to a little girlfriend`s house. Well, she subsequently went with girlfriends to Myrtle Beach and they were there. She was there in a motel room with her girlfriends. She went out on the evening of April 25th to visit a guy friend that was at a motel down the way along with his four friends. They were just platonic friends. There is surveillance video of her going into that motel. She spent 10 minutes with them, she left. And then there was a text message an hour later at 9:15 saying that she was going to go visit some other friends. She was never heard from after that.

GRACE: To Rupa Mikkilineni on the story, also joining us out of New York. Rupa, what more can you tell me?

RUPA MIKKILINENI, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right. We know that she left the hotel approximately 8:00 and at 8:00 she had spoken to her boyfriend who was still in Rochester. He did not come with her on this trip, Nancy. We also know that she walked about a half mile to this other hotel where she ended up meeting her friend, as Jean had just said earlier. It`s a platonic friend from Rochester. He`s a guy that`s little bit older than her, his name is Peter Brozowitz. And apparently they met earlier that afternoon at 3:00 p.m. on the beach. Then she left her hotel at about 8:00, walked the half mile to his hotel, met him in his hotel room where he claims that other boys also came into the hotel room. She was there for about 10 minutes. She apparently got into an argument with one of her roommate girlfriends about clothing, got upset and left. Now there is surveillance video showing her leaving that hotel at 8:45.

GRACE: Liz, do we have that surveillance video of her leaving the hotel room? OK, great. Let`s see that surveillance video. There you go. There`s Brittanee Marie Drexel. She`s just 17-years-old, leaving the hotel. There`s the video. Thank the lord they did not roll over the video or have a camera without film in it the way a lot of surveillance videos are. There she is. We know she`s alive at that time. We are taking your calls live. We`re about to be joined by her mother. To Debby in Oklahoma. Hi, Debby.

CALLER: Hello, Nancy, how are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

CALLER: My question is, when she left, is it possible that the manager or any employees there may have known anything about where she might have went or did she say anything to the manager?

GRACE: You know what, that`s a great question. Let`s go out to Brittanee`s mother, joining us is Dawn Drexel out of Rochester, New York. Ms. Drexel, thank you for being with us. I have to tell you that I and our whole staff have been following this case from day one and many a prayer has gone up on behalf of your daughter. What did you learn, Ms. Drexel, from employees there at the hotel?

DREXEL (on phone): Thank you, Nancy, for having us on. We didn`t really get much from the hotel staff. When we got into Myrtle Beach, we went to the police department and the police department asked us to go review the video at the hotel. So we didn`t really talk to anyone when we got there. When we got to the hotel, you know, they told us that we need to leave and we were sent there by the police department. So we --

GRACE: Wait a minute. Wait, wait, wait. Ms. Drexel, who told you needed to leave?

DREXEL: The hotel personnel.

GRACE: Why?

DREXEL: I`m not sure. I don`t think they wanted the publicity there.

GRACE: Really? What hotel was this?

DREXEL: Because we had walked in with quite a few people in which we were told, you know, to go take a look at this video because they had sent someone down there to go ahead and get that video prepared for us to view it, to identify Brittanee.

GRACE: Was this the Blue Water Motel? Excuse me. Was this the Blue Water Motel?

DREXEL: It was the Blue Water Resort, yes.

GRACE: Blue Water Resort. So they didn`t want the scandal of a mother coming to look for their little girl? Well, they`re going to get a little PR tonight because if they sent you packing and told you to leave when you were there to see the surveillance video of your daughter, that`s not a good thing.

DREXEL: No, they told us they were going to call the police. I said, go ahead. The police are the ones that told us to come there.

GRACE: You know, I want to go out to you, Marc Klaas. I don`t know what you went through totally when your little girl, Polly, was taken, but can you imagine the mom, Brittanee`s mother, Dawn, going all the way from Rochester, trying to find her daughter, landing at this Blue Water Resort Motel at Myrtle Beach and then them saying, hey, you know what, you`re causing ruckus. You need to leave.

MARC KLAAS, KLASSKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, actually I know Dawn. I`ve met Dawn on several occasions.

GRACE: I know you do.

KLAAS: And she`s a wonderful advocate for her child. She has made multiple trips between Rochester and Myrtle Beach. She has her own suspicions about what has happened. I think that she feels that there`s not been enough of a law enforcement presence in this case and has come to rely very heavily upon the CUE Center which is a wonderful organization that searches for missing individuals, mostly on the East Coast.

GRACE: Out to the lines. To Tara in Oregon. Hi, Tara.

CALLER: Hi.

GRACE: Hi, dear, what`s your question?

CALLER: I was wondering, is there any other surveillance tape that they think could possibly be her, you know, from other businesses and stuff? I see that they have the one that, you know, is kind of grainy and they have the other one in the hotel also. And then I was also wondering if the people that she went to meet, the four gentlemen, have any of them taken polygraphs?

GRACE: Excellent question. Let`s go to Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst, director of the cold case squad, Pine Lake PD, also author of "Cold Case: Pathways to Justice." What do you know, Sheryl?

SHERRYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: I don`t know anything about a polygraph, Nancy, and I agree with her. I think everybody should take one in this case. No question about it. But I do know one of the primary suspects lawyered up pretty quickly so he may not --

GRACE: Which one are you referring to?

MCCOLLUM: The gentleman that was the last one to see her. The young man whose hotel she went to then she left.

GRACE: That`s right. Explain, Jean Casarez.

CASAREZ: Peter, that would be the platonic friend, he was the last one along with his three other buddies to see her. He did get a lawyer. He did cooperate, we understand. Georgetown County officials are saying that there are three to four persons of interest in this case, without naming them. So I guess we could use our common sense in who they`re talking about.

GRACE: Rupa Mikkilineni, I agree with Jane about using your common sense. It`s very clear who they`re talking about, plus when a friend lawyers up, when your friend goes missing you don`t rush out and get a defense attorney unless there`s a problem.

Now, I`m sure the defense attorneys Jason Oshins and Alex Sanchez are going to disagree, but I think a jury would agree. But Rupa, we`re showing a little bit more video surveillance. Let`s see that, again, of her walking down the street. Rupa, is there anymore video surveillance possibly from nearby hotels? They all have video cameras.

MIKKILINENI: Right Nancy, this is a great question. Police have not, in fact, released any other video surveillance. In fact, it could exist. They have gotten other possible sightings of her which they are trying to track down and decide whether or not these are credible sightings.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Ms. Drexel, what is your understanding of the last time Brittanee was seen alive?

DREXEL: Well, my understanding was what had happened was she had went over to see a friend of hers in another hotel, and she had gotten a phone call from some girls that she had been staying with and what had happened - - I guess she was wearing a pair of one of the girl`s shorts.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not knowing where she is, who she`s with, how she got there, I mean, it`s heartbreaking. It`s heartbreaking and we want her home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: 17-year-old Brittanee Drexel took a trip with friends to Myrtle Beach, April 2009. On the night of April 25th, friends say she left the Bar Harbor Hotel to meet friends at another nearby hotel, the Blue Water Resort. Surveillance video shows Brittanee arriving at the resort and leaving about 10 minutes later. That was the last time anyone saw Brittanee.

GRACE: What did you think when police first showed you this surveillance video of Brittanee?

DREXEL: What they wanted me to do was take a look to see first of all if it was Brittanee. When I saw her profile then it was confirmed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Searches are focused on a wooded area near where Brittanee`s cell phone gave off its last known signal. Multiple agencies, crews on ATVs, horses, dogs, and searches by foot hoping to find the clue that could bring Brittanee home.

DREXEL: My goal is to find out what really happened and also to find her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. And tonight we`re focusing on a beautiful young girl, like how many other kids in America tells their mom she`s going one place and goes on spring break to Myrtle Beach. She`s never seen again after a very short time on spring break. To Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler." What do you think, Pat?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, Nancy, this is one of these really difficult cases where a young girl goes out into a public area, vanishes from there and it`s very difficult to determine if it`s because somebody she knows comes up to her or she goes to somebody she knows at some point or whether she was simply grabbed by some stranger in a window of opportunity. That area had issues with that.

As far as I`m looking back, we`re looking at possible serial rapist, serial killer in that area. They have to look at both of these avenues, but I`m curious to why they haven`t been able to narrow it down yet at any point.

GRACE: You know what, I am, too. I`m very curious especially in light of the friend lawyering up. I want to go back to Brittanee`s mother, Dawn Drexel. What do you know about these so-called friends?

DREXEL: Well, I know that these -- Peter -- Brittanee had known Peter probably about maybe four or five years. I think Alana (ph) was over at my house one time and Jen, I have never seen her. Some of the other kids Brittanee was friends with through her boyfriend and also there was quite a few kids down there from her school. But I didn`t know the kids all too well. I mean, they didn`t really come around that much.

GRACE: Out to Monica Caison, founder of the CUE Center for missing persons who organized a search for Brittanee Drexel. Joining us out of Wilmington, North Carolina. Thank you so much for being with us. Tell me about this search.

MONICA CAISON, FOUNDER, CUE CENTER: Thank you, Nancy. Basically we began our search on Saturday morning at 8:00 a.m. this past weekend. Our initial search efforts, of course, began right after Brittanee disappears and we have searched endlessly for her. But the most recent search was this weekend. We had over 200 people show up each day. We put a lot of variety of resources in this area. We completed 12 miles total and going about anywhere from 750 to 1,500 in-depth in the woods. We completed that task a little bit right at dark on Sunday.

GRACE: And Monica Caison, joining us via Skype from Wilmington, North Carolina. Everyone, this search just went down. Again, explain to us what led you do this particular area of land to search, and please describe the terrain.

CAISON: OK. Well, the area that Brittanee`s cell phone ping, you know, happened at, is a very vast area. It`s a historical area for plantations, so it`s just massive woods and swamped areas. It`s also surrounded by national wildlife parks and preserves. And then you have the Santee River as well which is just infested with gators and wildlife, so there are wild boar, snakes, gators and so forth. In the wintertime it`s not as bad that it was that we were battling in the summer and in the spring.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: What leads you to believe that Brittanee, your girlfriend, of many years is still alive?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If anybody can survive a situation like this, it would be Brittanee.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Brittanee was a 17-year-old beauty on a trip to Myrtle Beach with friends when she suddenly vanishes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Seen entering the Blue Water Motel around 8:00. Just 45 minutes later she`s seen leaving, the final known image of Brittanee.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Searchers including dogs and crews on ATVs have been searching an area near the last signal from Brittanee`s cell phone that night.

DREXEL: All I can think about is that she could be laying dead somewhere. It just, it`s tearing me up inside.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. We are talking about Brittanee Marie Drexel. Back to her mom, Dawn Drexel. Explain to me, she didn`t want you to know she went on spring break, is that what happened?

DREXEL: That is correct.

GRACE: Well, you know, that`s not the first or the last time that thousands of teens across the country do that every spring. They tell their parents they`re going somewhere else and they go on spring break. And what are you going to do? But what I don`t want is people somehow blaming her for what happened because kids do that every spring break since the inception of spring break. That`s not the end of the world. Otherwise she was extremely attentive to you. She called you all the time, was very well behaved, had never run away. Tell me about Brittanee, Ms. Drexel.

DREXEL: Brittanee was -- she was, you know, a very happy teenager. She was an avid soccer player. She`s played soccer since she was about 5 or 6 years old. She liked to hang out with her friends. She loved her family. She was always like a little mom to her sister and brother. I mean, she adored them. And I mean, she was having, you know, teenage issues, you know, just like, you know, normal teenagers do. And you know, around the time when Brittanee had ended up going missing, I was going through a divorce and then on top of that, she was having some issues with her boyfriend.

GRACE: Now, where was the boyfriend during this spring break?

DREXEL: He was in Rochester.

GRACE: So has he been ruled out, Ms. Drexel?

DREXEL: That I`m not sure of. I don`t know. I know that they really didn`t tell us much. I don`t know if he had been questioned or not. I know that they did have some questions for him, but I don`t believe they actually questioned questioned him. You know what I mean?

GRACE: Missing is 17-year-old Brittanee Marie Drexel. Tip line, 843- 918-1382.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

DREXEL: She said, oh, I`m just going to hang out, and we`re going to watch a movie. And I told her, I said, well, please give me a call later and she said, OK, mom. And then, you know, I told her, I said, I love you, Brittanee. And she says, I love you, mom. And then, we hung up the phone.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Just one year, she was set to graduate high school, had a bright future ahead. Seventeen-year-old Brittanee Drexel headed down to world famous Myrtle Beach to enjoy spring break with her friends, but Brittanee never came back.

DREXEL: If you`re out there, please call us, contact us. We love you. We miss you. We want you to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On the night of April 25th, friends say she left the Bar Harbor Hotel to meet some friends at another nearby hotel, the Blue Water Resort. Surveillance footage shows Brittanee arriving at the resort and leaving about ten minutes later. That was the last time anyone saw Brittanee.

DREXEL: Something`s very, very wrong. It`s not like my daughter to not call, even if it was a friend. We were not arguing. She would have called me. She would have called her boyfriend. She wouldn`t have left her clothes at the hotel.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now, suddenly, a huge search effort unleashed in the area where authorities believe Brittanee`s cell phone gave of its last ping. The heavily wooded area being searched by multiple agencies using ATVs, dogs and horses.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The searches are very physically and emotionally draining. Enough is enough. Someone needs to come forward. Someone needs to tell them what they know.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sissy, just please come home. I really want you home. I miss her saying sis to me all the time. I miss her being there after school.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One, two, three.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I miss her being just around and I just want her back. She`s, -- I just want my sister.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Where is Brittanee Drexel? She goes on spring break to Myrtle Beach, walks out of the hotel, the Blue Water Resort there in Myrtle Beach, and is never seen again. What about this scenario? Out to you, Pat Brown. We see her leaving the hotel. We know she`s had some sort of a dispute. That some of those friends, the male friends, pick her up? I don`t know what happens in that car, but she`s never seen along the roads after that.

We have no confirmed sightings that she was in any bar, movie, restaurant after that. We`ve had a couple of burps on that, but that right then, she`s picked up, and she`s never seen again. What do you think about that, Pat Brown?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, I think that`s exactly accurate. I think we`re looking at the exact time she walked out, give it a few minutes, that is when she disappeared. She either got into a car with somebody she knew or somebody abducted her. So, it seems to me like they should be able to focus in on that group.

Who`d be in that car that she would get in with, and see what their stories are, what their alibis are, what their statements say, what their polygraphs say and find out whether they are responsible, one of them is responsible. When they can clear that out of the way, then, they might look at somebody else abducting her. But clearly, she got in some car willingly or not at that point and disappeared and that was the night it happened.

GRACE: To Jean Casarez, Jean, tell me again, about the friends getting defense lawyers.

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": Well, these are the guys that were friends in the motel that she went to visit, and especially, Peter Brozowitz was her old-time friend. He lawyered up and the other guys, we don`t know officially, but Georgetown County officials are saying there are three to four persons of interest in this case, and there were three to four young men in that room.

GRACE: Unleash the lawyers. Jason Oshins and Alex Sanchez, both attorneys in the New York/New Jersey area. Jason, why would a friend lawyer up when his friend girl goes missing?

JASON OSHINS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Do you want the lawyer answer that says everyone has a right --

GRACE: No. I want the father answer.

OSHINS: Yes, the father answer says that troubles me, you know? And you know that once someone in that situation, you know, the instinct is to come and help and be part of the search and, you know, even if you`re trying to obfuscate the truth, you`re trying to blend in in some way as many, you know, ultimately perpetrators of crime do. But to lawyer up at some point, at least, we haven`t heard. Was that initially or was that after being questioned for a period of time? But yes, the father in me questions that a little bit.

GRACE: What about it, Sanchez?

ALEX SANCHEZ, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: You know, I would take this investigation one step further, Nancy. And that is the police, so far, have been keeping their information very close to the vest. Those four guys, I want to know their pictures. I want to see the car they were driving and their names should be released. Because someone out there, once they see their pictures and know their names, they may say something, you know, I remember an incident that occurred back then. I saw a car in the remote area and that car matches the car that belongs to one of these people. I think the police need to start releasing information and jar somebody`s memory.

GRACE: You know, that`s one thing I don`t understand. Rupa Mikkilineni, it`s been two years. Although, we just recently had a search that was organized by Monica Caison, why are police still holding the evidence in? Why not release it? They`re obviously not doing that well on their own.

RUPA MIKKILINENI, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, Nancy, one thing that we have to realize is that this search that happened over the weekend was, in fact -- it was in conjunction with the police. So, this search group, in fact, was working very closely with police based on tips and leads from the police, being told exactly where to search. And this is a six-mile stretch of dirt road, road that is exactly in the area where her cell phone pinged last. The other thing I want to make a point to you about is that the Myrtle Beach Police Department is, they are the lead investigators in this case, and they have said to me that they do not have any persons of interest at this time.

While it is true that the Georgetown Sheriff`s Office indicated many, many months ago that there were three or four persons of interest, the Myrtle Beach Police are, in fact, being very quiet about that. They are not naming Peter Brozowitz as a person of interest or suspect at this time.

GRACE: Well, you know, that makes me feel more confident that they were part of this search that was instigated by Monica Caison with the CUE Center for Missing Persons. The fact that they`re still working on the case and they haven`t just shelved it, that makes me feel much better about the whole scenario. To Dawn Drexel, this is Brittanee`s mother, were you told there were persons of interest?

DREXEL: We were told there were persons of interest right before Brittanee`s one-year anniversary. But I know that there`s a new task force for Brittanee that is working on her case, actively working on her case and following up on the tips and all the tips and leads that have come in for Brittanee.

GRACE: To Dr. Janet Taylor, Dr. Taylor, do you believe that she would continue to conceal her whereabouts? I don`t.

DR. JANET TAYLOR, M.D., MPH, PSYCHIATRIST: Yes, I really don`t think that she would continue to do that. I mean, it sounds like she was a nice young girl who, you know, made an ill advised trip, but she would want to be back in touch with her mother and certainly her siblings.

GRACE: Tonight, we are helping to find America`s missing, and right now, we are just receiving information about a missing 16-year-old out of Atlanta. Her name Bianca Barnes. Jean Casarez, what do we know about Bianca Barnes?

CASAREZ: Well, Nancy, this is the daughter of a Fulton County Sheriff`s Deputy, that`s right there in Atlanta where you are. And this is a young girl that took the bus to school every day. In fact, she took two buses, a public bus and then switched to the school bus. And it is believed she may have gotten on to the first bus, nobody remembers her getting on the school bus, but she is gone. And this is as of Thursday, January 27th. She is 16 years old, a black female, dark brown eyes. She`s about 5`9" and 250 pounds. And everyone in Atlanta is on the lookout for her.

GRACE: Take a look, Bianca "BB" Barnes. She`s an 11th grader at Benjamin Mays High School, 5`9", black braids with blond streaks. She`s wearing black jeans, a blue polo sweater, brown and blue polo, last seen 6:00 a.m. Her home, Continental Colony Apartments. Tip line, 404-546- 4260. Jean, does she have any history of being a runaway?

CASAREZ: No, not at all. She lives with her great grandmother to help take care of her great-grandmother, and there is no sign at all that she would do ever anything like this. She went to school every day in high school and just took the bus.

GRACE: So, the last she`s seen is on the bus?

CASAREZ: I believe there was a sighting of her on the first bus, which would be a public bus that would take her to the park and ride, but no evidence that she ever got from the park and ride on to the school bus.

GRACE: Please help us find Bianca "BB" Barnes, just 16 years old. Time is passing. It`s just been a few days since she goes missing.

And tonight, please help us find Karen Denise Wells, 23 years old, vanishes April 12th, 1994, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. White female, 5`6", 115 pounds, blond hair, bluish-green eyes. If you have information, please, call 866-898-8477.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to cnn.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DREXEL: Something`s very, very wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She wouldn`t just pack up and leave.

DREXEL: It`s not like my daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Seventeen-year-old --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Brittanee.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Brittanee.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Brittanee Drexel spent the weekend in Myrtle Beach with friends.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: April 25th.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: April 25th.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: April 25th.

DREXEL: She didn`t have my permission to go.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Teenager from Rochester, New York has not been seen --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And not (ph) be found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Since she left the Myrtle Beach Hotel.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Brittanee vanished.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vanished.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Leaving her belongings behind.

DREXEL: It`s tearing me up inside.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Not calling anybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She`s not going to just leave.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s very, very shady.

DREXEL: Someone could have taken her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: A little fishy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Surveillance video shows Brittanee fading away into the unknown.

DREXEL: She could be laying dead somewhere.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Final no image of Brittanee.

DREXEL: It`s not knowing --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Pray for the best.

DREXEL: Not knowing where she is.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Pray for the worst.

DREXEL: Who she`s with.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Evidence is running dry.

DREXEL: How she got there.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Someone, somewhere, knows what happened.

DREXEL: She says, I love you mom, and then, we hung up the phone.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls, but first, to Sheryl McCollum. Sheryl, what can we do now?

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: Re-interview. They`ve got to re- interview those young men in that room starting with peter if they can and if not move out to his social circle. There have been parties where people got drunk and ran their mouth. They`ve grown up a little bit. People are now in college. Maybe, they`re not as afraid as they were to speak. And also, there`ve been breakups. I mean, people aren`t as loyal as they were two years ago. They`ve got to talk to them again. Somebody knows something, Nancy.

GRACE: They do, Sheryl. Out to the lines. Lynn, Ohio. Hi, Lynn.

LYNN, OHIO: Hi, Nancy.

GRACE: Hi, dear. What`s your question?

LYNN: First of all, I just want to say how awesome you are and how I think your twins are gorgeous. OK. So, my question is, have they found -- since they did the search over the weekend, have they found any new leads?

GRACE: You know, to Jean Casarez, let`s talk about that search. The area. The pings.

CASAREZ: You know, Nancy, we learned something new tonight because Monica Caison from the CUE Center for Missing Children, she told us that that area that they searched this weekend, Georgetown County area, very marshy, historically plantation lands, very woodsy. Nancy, do you realize that Brittanee`s cell phone pinged hours after she went missing from that area and then the next day it pinged from that area? Who would voluntarily go out to a marshy area like that for a 24-hour period?

GRACE: Nobody, which means, either she was there or her cell phone was discarded there. So, they need to be also looking for a cell phone out there. To Monica Caison, did anyone come upon a cell phone?

MONICA CAISON, CUE CENTER FOR MISSING CHILDREN: Nancy, we have searched from the third day Brittanee disappeared, and we looked very, very hard for that phone. We have not found the phone, any contents that would be in her pocketbook, her shoes, any type of clothing or no human remains. Simply nothing at all that would be a direct link to Brittanee Drexel.

GRACE: Rupa Mikkilineni, what about sunglasses?

MIKKILINENI: That`s right, Nancy. We know that just a few months after Brittanee disappeared, there were pair of sunglasses that were found in that very area near the Santee River. Apparently, these sunglasses are knock off designer sunglasses that were, in fact, the exact, similar make model whatever sunglasses that Brittanee Drexel was wearing the day she disappeared. Now, the sunglasses have been turned into the forensic institute. They are with law enforcement. We have not heard whether they --

GRACE: And where were they found, Rupa?

MIKKILINENI: Along the river in the very area where her cell phone was pinging last on the 26th that Sunday. This area where they searched over the weekend.

GRACE: To Linda in California. Hi, Linda.

LINDA, CALIFORNIA: Hi, Nancy. We both survived blood clots.

GRACE: Praise the lord. It seems like so long ago, but you`re right, my lungs were full of blood clots after I delivered the twins. Congratulations. Thank you.

LINDA: Can I give a link to your people when we`re done of some research I did, please?

GRACE: Sure.

LINDA: OK. Awesome. Also, my thoughts. Is there any one specific reason other than, you know, the fear of spring break, God forbid, why the mother had a gut feeling not to let her go?

GRACE: That`s a good question.

LINDA: And the other question is, if the mother really hasn`t given up hope like she`s saying, then why all the references in the past tense? I`m just asking. I`m not trying to blame.

GRACE: To Dawn Drexel. Tell me about that gut feeling you had about her going to spring break.

DREXEL: Well, Brittanee was pretty adamant about going to Myrtle Beach, and when I told her she couldn`t go, she asked me why. And I had told her, I said, I don`t know the kids that you`re supposedly be going with. There`s no parental supervision. And I felt like something was going to happen to her.

GRACE: And several people have noticed, tonight, that you refer to her in the past tense. Why?

DREXEL: Well, I`m just coming back from Myrtle Beach, and I drove there, so it was a 14-hour drive. I mean, these searches are very, you know, mentally and physically exhausting. I mean, you know, we have hope that Brittanee is still out there. We have hope that she`s still out there.

GRACE: Speaking right now is Brittanee`s mom, Dawn Drexel. To Tiffany in New York. Hi, tiffany.

TIFFANY, NEW YORK: Hello.

GRACE: Hi, dear. What`s your question?

TIFFANY: I was just wondering if they had questioned the girls that went down to Myrtle Beach Lately?

GRACE: Good question. You know, things change when two years have passed. To Monica Caison, founder of CUE Center for Missing Persons, organized this weekend`s search for Brittanee. Do we know if those girls have been re-interviewed, Miss Caison?

CAISON: No, that`s actually one of the things advocating for Dawn Drexel and her family that we`ve been bringing to the attention of the investigators lately. She`s got a great team working on her case, but Dawn has expressed concern for probably the past six months that she wants these children, teenagers, adults, what have you that were there. She wants them interviewed, and we`re pushing for that. She wants -- she feels like --

GRACE: Right.

CAISON: If they were properly interviewed, some interviewed again.

GRACE: I want to go back to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation. What do you think, Marc?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I think that the possibility of people that don`t know the area finding themselves in a very remote location that is basically inaccessible by most modes of transportation might point in the direction of somebody that was there to cause harm to somebody at spring break. You know, spring break is a rite of passage for America`s free-spirited youth. But it`s also a destination for those individuals who would want to exploit America`s free-spirited youth.

Therefore, it`s incumbent to do a couple things. Those locations such as Daytona Beach, Myrtle Beach and Cancun need to have extra security during these times, and I think that those kids that are going there need to do things like keeping together, ensuring that they always have their cell phones with them, taking security measures to ensure that they don`t find themselves in a position like Brittanee.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, mother, father, disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Kimberly Norwood was last seen by friends as they were walking home. Two decades later, her mother still keeps hope alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Kim was 12 1/2 years old when she disappeared on May 20th of 1989. She and her horse, Redbird, were just doing great together. That`s what she was into then, riding horses. She came in first place in her age division. Kim was very smart. She was two weeks from finishing sixth grade when she disappeared. She was going to be in two advanced classes. Pretty, caring. We just need to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Jennifer Pandos disappeared in the Williamsburg, Virginia area in 1987. If you have any information, call 1-800-the-lost.

Kristen Modafferi was a good student for the North Carolina State School of Design. Kristen went to San Francisco in the summer of 1997. She took a job at a downtown coffee shop. On June 1st, she left work and vanished without a trace.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We just don`t know. We have no answers. There have been no clues. We just feel that it`s not a runaway situation at all. Kristen had very close ties to her family. We have no reason to suspect that she would have walked away or wanted to disappear. We believe she ran into foul play without a doubt. She was very inquisitive and always looking for new adventures and new experiences.

Kristen told us that she really wanted to make a difference in the world and she was really working hard towards that goal, and unfortunately, that was cut tragically short. We continue to do everything we possibly can to try to find answers.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END


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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Wed Feb 02, 2011 11:09 am

January 31, 2011
The McStay Family: Nancy Grace America's Missing


Posted: 11:37 PM ET

How does a family of four simply vanish? Joseph McStay, his wife and two little boys had not been heard from since February 4, 2010.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Mcstay10

On February 8, the family vehicle (a white Isuzu trooper) is found in a parking lot in a San Ysidro, CA town near the Mexican boarder. The children’s car seats were still in the car. On February 15 McStay’s brother asked police to conduct a welfare check at the family’s home. When deputies entered the home they found two dogs home alone without care and it didn’t appear as if the family left on a planned trip. Belongings that would have been essential for a vacation were left behind along with perishable items on the counter. At that time it becomes clear to friends and family that something is amiss. Almost a year later, the McStay’s are still missing.

Tipline: 888-580-TIPS
Reward: $1,000

JOSEPH MATEO MARTELLI MCSTAY, JR.
Age: 3
Sex: Male
Race: White
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Height: 2’6”
Weight: 35 lbs

GIANNI GIUSEPPE MARTELLI MCSTAY
Age: 4
Sex: Male
Race: White
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Height: 3’
Weight: 40 lbs

SUMMER MCSTAY
Age: 43
Sex: Female
Race: White
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Height: 5’5”
Weight: 115 lbs

JOSEPH MCSTAY
Age: 40
Sex: Male
Race: White
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Height: 5’9”
Weight: 175 lbs




Entire Family Disappears in Southern California

Aired February 1, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Mama.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They never had babysitters. I mean, they were always -- just the four of them were together all the time.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Joseph McStay lived on a quiet cul- de-sac in San Diego County`s Fallbrook with his wife and two young boys.

JOSEPH MCSTAY, MISSING FATHER: Jay (ph), did you just make the perfect latte?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Neighbors remember them as a loving couple devoted to their children. But on February 4, 2009, Joseph, Summer, 4- year-old Gianni and 3-year-old Joseph Jr. vanished without a trace.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I love her. I want my family home safe. I want them to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Chilling clues inside the home indicates a family who disappeared without warning. Left behind, eggs on the kitchen counter and the family`s two dogs.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Right now we`re still reviewing tapes, following up on some tips that we`ve received, both from the public and family members. Also going through additional records, financial records, both their personal records, as well as business records.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Four days later, their SUV, an Isuzu Trooper, found abandoned along the U.S./Mexico border in a strip mall parking lot. Investigators confirm they believe the SUV parked there between 5:00 and 9:00 p.m. the day it`s located.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I just don`t understand what happened and I just want them to be back home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Surveillance video showing two adults and two children crossing into Mexico, plus an alleged sighting at a restaurant in Baja. Both prove inconclusive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They had a very good life. There was no reason at all to just up and, poof, disappear. I worry about these babies and, are they fed, are they warm, are they, you know, happy? Are they sad?

You know, you pray and then you -- I`m sorry -- cry yourself to sleep.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone. But where?

Tonight, live, Fallbrook, California, just north of San Diego. The McStays, a happy family of four -- mommy, daddy, two boys, 3 and 4 years old. Daddy`s got his own business. Mommy working on a real estate license.

February 9, 2010, Joseph McStay`s brother calls and calls. No answer. When a friend checks on the home, they find the family dogs inside barking, the breakfast still sitting out on the counter waiting to be cooked up for the two boys.

All the family`s personal belongings, their effects, in tact in the home. Only one thing`s missing -- the family. They`ve never been seen again.

Tonight, where are the McStays?

Straight out to Teri Figueroa, reporter with "The North County Times."

Teri, thank you for being with us. What happened?

TERI FIGUEROA, "NORTH COUNTY TIMES": Well, all we know is that this story really ends, if you will on, on February 4th. They just simply disappeared.

Four days later, their car was towed, but no one knew at the time that they were missing, so it didn`t raise any red flags until their brother of Joseph McStay, finally contacted police on the 15th and said, we don`t know where they are.

GRACE: You are seeing video of the McStay family. There`s a mommy, a daddy and two boys: Joseph "Joey" Brian McStay, 40 years old, 5`9", 175 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. Summer McStay, 43, 5`5", 115 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. Gianni McStay, just 4 years old, 3 feet, 40 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes. And little Joseph McStay, 2`6", 35 pounds, brown hair, brown eyes, birthmark on the forehead.

These are some of the last images we have of the McStay family.

Out to Jean Casarez, legal correspondent, "In Session."

Jean, give me the timeline. What happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": OK. It`s February 4th, almost one year ago to the day, Nancy, 2010, and we now know the day seemed to start out pretty normally, because the husband`s credit card was used in the morning hours, it`s believed by his wife, Summer, to buy some toys for the kids and maybe some towels.

A neighbor`s surveillance video camera sees what`s believed to be the family car back out of the driveway at 7:47 p.m. February 4th, never to be seen again. And here`s what`s left in the house. Eggs are left out on the kitchen counter. The prescription dark glasses of Summer`s are on the counter. And most of all, their two dogs that they loved and considered as their first born children were left in the back yard without any food.

GRACE: Take a look at the McStays. You`re seeing video of Summer McStay and her baby, Joseph McStay. There`s the other son, Gianni.

What do they do for a living? What do we know about them, Teri Figueroa?

FIGUEROA: Well, Joseph McStay designed high-end interior water fountains, the sort that you might see in corporate headquarters. And Summer McStay was at a stay-at-home mom, but she was just getting back into the real estate business. She had a license.

GRACE: With me right now, a special guest. Michael McStay joining us out of Irving, California. He is the brother of Joseph McStay.

Michael, thank you for being with us.

MICHAEL MCSTAY, JOSEPH MCSTAY`S BROTHER: It`s my pleasure. Thanks for having me.

GRACE: Yes, sir.

Let`s go back through what we know. Back me up to February 4, 2010. Tell me what happened just prior to that.

M. MCSTAY: Prior to that everything was normal. But on February 4th, pretty much everything stopped.

Cell phones stopped. Summer got a couple of texts on I think the 6th, but the paper trail, the banking transactions, everything pretty much stopped. And then, all of a sudden, the vehicle shows up on Monday the 8th.

GRACE: Michael, where were they going that evens around 7:30 p.m.?

M. MCSTAY: We don`t know.

GRACE: Tell me, what can you tell us about trying to reach them? I understand that you called and called the home.

M. MCSTAY: Joey and I normally talk on Fridays. We usually talk once or twice a week. He`d call me.

It was actually on the 9th that I was talking with my father. He got an e-mail from someone that oversees Joey`s Web site. And they said, you know, basically they couldn`t get a hold of Joey, and so this is Web Dan (ph).

Dan (ph) basically called, San Diego Sheriff`s Department, has the sheriff`s department doing a welfare check on Wednesday the 10th. And, you know, basically on the 13th, I go down and crawl through a window, and I`m looking for phone numbers or -- you know, that`s kind of what got it going.

GRACE: So when the police went there, they couldn`t determine whether anything was wrong. Then you go the next day, crawl through a window.

And what did you find inside, Michael?

M. MCSTAY: I saw the house in disarray, but I knew that they were doing a remodel. The cupboards were out. They were on top of the counters.

I didn`t catch the eggs. I didn`t catch her glasses. I didn`t catch the popcorn on the sofa.

I don`t have crime-fighting eyes. I missed all that stuff. When the detectives --

GRACE: So popcorn was still sitting out on the sofa as if they had been watching TV?

Marc Klaas, president and founder, Klaas Kids Foundation, this is your forte. What do you think?

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: Well, these are people that disappeared off the face of the earth.

I watched a lot of the videos that are on YouTube, and this is obviously a very upbeat, loving family. My best guess -- and certainly that`s all any of us have here, Nancy -- is that whatever happened to them happened to them on that very first evening, and that perhaps the car was taken to San Ysidro as a diversion from what really happened. But I suspect that they were probably victims of some kind of a horrendous crime.

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

To Linda in Oklahoma.

Hi, Linda.

LINDA, OKLAHOMA: Hi, Nancy. Thank you for taking my call.

GRACE: Thank you for calling in, dear. What`s your question?

LINDA: I have a question. There`s a family that`s missing from Oklahoma called the Jamison (ph) family, and their case is eerily similar to this case with the abandoned car, the abandoned dogs with no food and water.

Have they maybe linked this family to other missing family cases in the area?

GRACE: That`s a great question.

Jean Casarez, what do we know?

CASAREZ: This is the only family that has been missing from this area. But it is so close to the Mexican border.

San Ysidro is where the car was found and the video that it was believed at one point that it was the family walking over. That`s over into Tijuana. That`s how close you are to Mexico.

GRACE: You`re taking a look at the McStay family -- father Joseph "Joey" Brian McStay, age 40; Summer McStay, age 43; Gianni McStay, 4; Joseph McStay, 3. An entire family gone missing.

Take a look at these little boys. Obviously loved by their parents.

The family dogs found left unattended, they are barking. Food is still on the counter to be cooked up for breakfast.

Tell me again, Jean, about them heading out to make purchases.

CASAREZ: That was -- now, this was found after the fact, of course, after search warrants were executed and they were able to get these records. But Joseph McStay`s credit card had been used that morning, it was believed by Sunny, and it was some children`s toys, I believe, and maybe some towels or beach towels.

And then there was that video surveillance from a neighbor that caught the back end of a car driving out of the driveway, but it was white and it matched the McStays` car. And then there was a phone call 8:15 that evening, on Tuesday, the 4th of April, that was made by Joseph McStay to one of his employees, and that was it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

J. MCSTAY: Hi, Jay (ph). Did you just make the perfect latte?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Home video shows the bond between Joseph McStay, his wife Summer, and their two little boys. In late 2009, the family of four had just settled into their new home in San Diego County. Within months, the McStays fall off the face of the earth, vanishing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I know they didn`t skip town. I know they wouldn`t hurt one another. They`re beautiful, amazing people, and they were very happy.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: February 4, 2010 is the last time anyone has heard from the McStay family. When Joseph`s brother went to the home 10 days later, he found the family dogs left alone, unfed, and food still sitting on the kitchen counter.

And what about the family van found abandoned four days later in a San Ysidro parking lot?

GRACE: Where exactly along the border was their vehicle discovered?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It was actually about two blocks from the crossing itself in a private parking lot.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police recovered grainy surveillance video showing two adults and two children crossing the border by foot. But cops have been unable to confirm the McStays are the ones seen on the video.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. Out to the lines.

Stacey in Ohio.

Hi, Stacy.

STACY, OHIO: Hi, Nancy. I have a comment and a question.

GRACE: OK.

STACY: Who could ever do that to a child? I mean, really.

And my question is, did they inspect the trunk and the car?

GRACE: Good question. As far as who could do that to a child, let me tell you something, Stacy. I have looked across courtrooms at defendants, felony defendants, for years wondering why. And never once have I ever gotten an answer that was satisfactory.

Finally, after about seven years of doing it, I tried to quit wondering why, because why doesn`t really matter. What matters is, did this thing happen, can we save the child, is there any way to save the child? Is there any way to put things back together again?

And if there`s not, can we put the perpetrator behind bars -- or worse? That`s the way I see it now.

What do you think, Marc Klaas? Do you ever get caught up in the why?

KLAAS: Well, you know, there are people who are specially trained to do that. There are the FBI profilers, there are psychiatrists and psychologists that spend entire careers looking into the mind of violent criminals --

GRACE: And what does it get you, Marc?

KLAAS: Well, it gets you nothing, because I certainly don`t try to go there. I can`t go there, nor I don`t believe can any normal law-abiding citizen put their mind where these people`s minds are. Perhaps some of the profilers can.

I understand that a lot of these individuals have to retire early because the psychological strain becomes so heavy upon them. But I don`t think any of us should even attempt to go there because we`ll never be able to get there.

GRACE: Well, you know what? There`s a huge fascination about why.

Let me go to Dr. Lillian Glass.

Why do people do this? So, in the end, so we find out why they did it. Where does that get me? The child is still abused or killed or missing.

What good does it do me to do mental gymnastics to find out why these people do these things?

DR. LILLIAN GLASS, PSYCHOLOGIST: You`re absolutely right, Nancy. It doesn`t matter. What matters is to find --

GRACE: It just gets me more upset trying to figure out why.

GLASS: Exactly. Exactly, because it doesn`t matter why. You just said it so well.

But one of the things with this family that`s very important, and Marc Klaas said it, they`re such a beautiful, loving family.

GRACE: They really are.

GLASS: They care so much about one another. And they`re so wonderful.

And perhaps the fact that they left the dogs alone without any food may have been an indication that they thought they were going to come back soon. So something strange happened there.

GRACE: You know, that`s a mild way of putting it, something strange.

To Teri Figueroa with "The North County Times," joining us from Escondido, California.

I assume that the car trunk was searched.

FIGUEROA: Yes. In fact, the whole car was searched.

What they found was the children`s car seats were still in the car. And Summer was, from what I understand, quite a stickler for her children`s safety, and she would never have allowed them to go into Mexico without having car seats.

GRACE: Never. Never.

FIGUEROA: So that`s definitely a mystery.

GRACE: Out to Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler."

What do you make of this question from Stacy, Ohio, "Why?"

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, I think when we`re looking at people`s minds, I mean, we have to look at why only for understanding their behaviors and then being able to predict what they might do. That`s very important.

This family, I don`t know. Maybe they just planned to go for the evening. It`s a short little jaunt in there. Maybe they went over and got kidnapped. Or if that wasn`t what happened, they were planning something.

GRACE: And, you know, with the crime rate in Mexico, it`s just stunning to me that anybody would go there with their children. But unless they went across the border illegally, there`s no evidence they ever willingly went to Mexico.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): With more questions than answers, the FBI and San Diego County authorities continue to search for a missing family that was last seen February 4, 2010. Forty-year-old Joseph McStay, his wife Summer, and two sons, Gianni and Joseph Jr., vanish from their Fallbrook home, leaving behind their two dogs and a carton of eggs on the counter.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just a beautiful, wonderful mother, wife, daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still reviewing tapes, following up on some tips we received. Personally, I`ve been in law enforcement over 30 years and I`ve never seen anything like this.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

To Laura in Pennsylvania.

Hi, dear.

LAURA, PENNSYLVANIA: Hi. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good. What`s your question?

LAURA: I have two questions, actually.

GRACE: OK.

LAURA: When the police -- after the family vanished, they searched the home. Did they find credit cards, licenses, birth certificates for the children? And also, have the Mexican authorities been alerted with posters or anything like that on this family?

GRACE: That`s a good question.

Let`s go to Michael McStay. He is Joseph McStay`s brother.

Did they find those important documents in the home, Michael?

M. MCSTAY: They know a few things. They know that Summer`s passports expired. Joey`s passport is current. Gianni`s birth certificate is accounted for. And Joey Jr., who had a birthday yesterday -- he`s 4 now -- they don`t have -- or actually, my mother has his birth certificate.

GRACE: So you`re saying that your brother`s passport was still current but hasn`t been accounted for.

M. MCSTAY: My brother`s passport is current. I don`t know where it`s at, but I know that`s what the detectives told me.

GRACE: So it was not found in the home? Are you saying it was not found in the home, or you don`t know whether it was found in the home?

M. MCSTAY: I do not know if it was found in the home. The detectives --

GRACE: Let me ask you this, Michael. Do you really believe your brother would have just disappeared into Mexico and never let you guys or your parents know that they were still alive?

M. MCSTAY: Absolutely not. No. I don`t believe he would do that. He`s not that type of person.

GRACE: Have you seen this video, Michael? It`s a silhouette of a family walking across the border. Have you seen that video?

M. MCSTAY: I`ve seen it about a thousand times. I could probably recite the thing (ph).

GRACE: Is it them?

M. MCSTAY: Possibly the boys, possibly Summer, but I don`t recognize my brother in that. I can spot my brother anywhere, but I couldn`t I.D. him in that, no.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Mama.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They never had baby sitters. I mean, they were always, just the four of them were together all the time.

GRACE (voice-over): Joseph McStay lived on a quiet cul-de-sac in San Diego County Fallbrook with his wife and two young boys.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Jay, did you just make the perfect latte?

GRACE: Neighbors remember them as a loving couple devoted to their children, but on February 4th, 2009, Joseph, Summer, 4-year-old Gianni and 3-year-old Joseph Jr., vanished without a trace.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I love her. I want my family home safe. I want them to come home.

GRACE: Chilling clues inside the home indicates a family who disappeared without warning. Left behind, eggs on the kitchen counter and the family`s two dogs.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Right now, we`re still reviewing tapes, following up on some tips that we received both from the public and family members, also going through additional records, financial records, both their personal records as well as business records.

GRACE: Four days later, their SUV, an Isuzu Trooper, found abandoned along the U.S./Mexico border in a strip mall parking lot. Investigators confirm they believe the SUV parked there between 5:00 and 9:00 p.m. the day it`s located.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just don`t understand what happened. I just want them to be back home.

GRACE: Surveillance video showing two adults and two children crossing into Mexico. Plus, an alleged sighting at a restaurant in Baja. Both prove inconclusive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They had a very good life. There was no reason at all to just up and poof and disappear. I worry about those babies and are they fed, are they warm, are they, you know, happy, are they sad? You know, you pray and then you -- I`m sorry -- cry yourself to sleep.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): We are taking your calls. Where are the McStays? I want to go back to Joseph McStay`s brother, Michael McStay, joining us tonight. Let`s see that video, again, Dana. I want to see the video of the family crossing the border. Michael, you said that you may be able to make out the mom or the children, but it was not your brother. Do you believe that was the mother? Summer?

MICHAEL MCSTAY, BROTHER OF MISSING DAD/HUSBAND, JOSEPH MCSTAY: It`s kind of hard to tell. After they did the video enhancement, they thought they could make out what appears to be UGG boots, and Summer did always wear UGG boots. So, you know --

GRACE: But other than the boots --

MCSTAY: It kind of goes that direction. Yes. I mean, you saw the video. It`s terrible.

GRACE: I`m looking at it right now. I can`t make a thing out. I mean, that is of no evidentiary value to me, but I thought maybe you -- let me ask you this.

MCSTAY: Sure.

GRACE: If it were her and the two children, had she had marital discord with your brother? Is there some reason she would have taken the children to Mexico?

MCSTAY: I sure hope not. There`s no evidence of that. I mean, you know, they were together for over five years. They got married about three years ago. They kind of got a little -- I guess they`re excited, but anyway, they loved each other.

GRACE: Excited. I`m sorry, I couldn`t hear you. Excited about what?

MCSTAY: Each other, you know? I was making a joke. How they kind of got the cart before the horse, you know, but --

GRACE: But they look so happy.

MCSTAY: They are happy. And that`s part of the mystery.

GRACE: So, let me get this straight. One more time. Michael McStay, you can`t even say 50/50 that was them in the silhouette?

MCSTAY: I would actually go lower than that. My first -- the first time I saw it, I said, I hope this isn`t the best you have. Possibly, the children look age and size appropriate. Maybe that`s Summer. Maybe, it`s --

GRACE: That could be anybody. That could be anybody, then.

MCSTAY: I know.

GRACE: OK. All right. Let`s go back to what we know. The car that was parked in that strip mall, did none of those stores have video surveillance of the car getting parked and who got out of the car?

MCSTAY: There were video cameras, actually, everywhere on that. There was a bank right there. There was -- I mean, I went down there. I went and talked to the security guard, but no, nothing was caught.

GRACE: Oh, man.

MCSTAY: And we tried to do, you know, we had Texas Equusearch out, and we tried to do -- we even had -- they had connections through the NASA. They tried to do satellite digital imaging, but that night was extremely cold. It was about 50 degrees, and there was such a heavy marine layer. There was no way to do any video imaging to see when the car arrived, when, who got out of the car.

GRACE: Got it.

MCSTAY: The detectives tell me that all the seats were appropriate to the size of, you know, the McStay Family, but still nothing.

GRACE: And what about the sighting, this alleged sighting in Baja at a restaurant?

MCSTAY: That`s Mama Espinosa`s. That was in actually Guerrero Negro. There`s a good friend of mine that was willing to go down to the Baja Peninsula three times already and pass out fliers, talk to people. And that waiter is still convinced to this day that he even said, you know, what happened, did she bump her head? Did she hit her head? You know --

GRACE: What are you talking about?

MCSTAY: Chubba is the nickname that we have for the littlest one, Baby G and Baby J, but J has a birthmark on his forehead. And the waiter said to my friend, said, what happened to her? Did she bump her head? To me that was the most credible that that resonated with me. But when they checked the map that supposedly they left, there was the fingerprints didn`t line up. So, was it a good lead? Maybe. But, you know, there was no --

GRACE: You really do not believe, Michael, you really do not believe your brother, what about your sister-in-law? Would she bump off your brother and take the children to Mexico? Is she capable of that?

MCSTAY: I sure hope not. I don`t believe so.

GRACE: No, no, no. Do you think she is or not?

MCSTAY: I hope not. No.

GRACE: Because everything I`ve learned about the family says no. That she would never have taken the father away from those children. Would never happen. They were together all the time. From our research, there`s no indication of marital discord. No other lovers, no fighting over money. Nothing. They were happy. Nothing to suggest either one of them would take the children and head to Mexico. But what about them as a family? You say they would never have left you and your parents hanging, not knowing whether they were dead or alive, right, Michael?

MCSTAY: Absolutely.

GRACE: Unleash the lawyers. Ray Giudice, Hugo Rodriguez. Weigh in, Hugo.

HUGO RODRIGUEZ, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: This is very unusual, and I`ve been troubled by this since the story came out a long time ago, and I just have no clues. We don`t know if something happened to them. We don`t know if they voluntarily left, but it looks like all the leads have been covered, but we just have a lot of unanswered questions, Nancy. I`m perplexed.

GRACE: Raymond?

RAYMOND GIUDICE, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, there`s no crime to vanish. You`re entitled to make yourself invisible, unless, you`re avoiding law enforcement. The one thing I want to point out is, that if these parents purposely and voluntarily placed these very young children, one of whom had asthma medication nearby in a dangerous or unhealthy environment, they might be looking at a stretch, some sort of child endangerment or reckless conduct to the children.

GRACE: Yes. You know what, that is a stretch, but good stab at it, Giudice.

Everyone, quick break. We`re taking your calls. Tonight`s case alert, a miracle, after reporting on our show last night about a 16-year- old girl disappeared, she is found safe. Bianca "BB" Barnes, daughter of a Fulton County deputy, reported missing Thursday, last seen getting on a public bus on her way to school. Tonight, Bianca, safe, returned to her family.

And tonight, please help us find a missing girl, Erin Pospisil, 15 years old, vanishes June 3, 2001, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Take a look. White female, 5`2", 125 pounds, dark brown hair, red highlights, brown eyes. Beautiful brown eyes. If you have info, call 319-286-5400.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They had a very good life, so there was no reason at all to just up and poof and disappear.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Cadillac mama.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The couple was last heard from on February 4th. On the 6th, both of their cell phones died. Then, on the 8th, their Isuzu Trooper was found two blocks from the Mexican border. Police say the family did not pack to go on vacation. Their two dogs left without food and water in the backyard.

GRACE: So, you`re telling me that there in the home when cops arrived they found refrigerated items left out? Like milk?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes, yes, refrigeratable items were left out along with they did find the family`s dog there unattended, uncared for.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police thought they may have gotten a break in the case when grainy surveillance video captured two adults and two young children cross into Mexico in the same area the day the vehicle was found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I think it`s important the more that`s out there, the better chances we would have of someone coming forward with some bit of information that might lead us in the right direction.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Back to the lines. Jessica in South Carolina. Hi, Jessica.

JESSICA, SOUTH CAROLINA: Hi, Nancy. How are you? I have a quick question. Could they have had any enemies or ran into any trouble to suddenly just make the decision that their lives are in danger, had to suddenly disappear or go into witness protection? And if that`s possible, could they know someone far away that could be helping them out?

GRACE: Good question. To Teri Figueroa, what do we know, Teri?

VOICE OF TERI FIGUEROA, REPORTER, NORTH COUNTY TIMES: What we do know is with regard to Mexico, on the 27th and the 28th, which is about a week before they went missing, there were inquiries made from a computer inside the home to a website, I believe it was about.com. And the questions were about travel in Mexico and passports for children going to Mexico.

GRACE: Repeat. Tell me again.

FIGUEROA: About a week before they disappeared, someone from inside the home could have been Summer, could have been Joey, could have been anyone, sent an e-mail query to a website called about.com, I believe it was and had asked questions on that website. It`s a place where you go to ask questions about travel in Mexico and about passports for children.

GRACE: Was there any indication that they, from the search, that they were trying to get a passport, Teri?

FIGUEROA: We haven`t seen the actual questions. We`ve only been told by investigators that these were the queries that someone used the family computer to make.

GRACE: Jean Casarez, what do we know about it?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": The only thing we know that goes against all of that is that Summer McStay had told her friends, you know, we want to go on a vacation, but I don`t want to go to Mexico, and she was very, very strong about that because they lived so close to the border, but she thought it was dangerous, and she didn`t want the family to go there.

GRACE: Sarah in New York. Hi, Sarah.

SARAH, NEW YORK: Hi. I have a statement and a question.

GRACE: OK.

SARAH: The statement is, nobody really knows what happens behind closed doors, so is it possible in any way that the father could have possibly done anything to the family? And taken them to Mexico for some unknown reason for kidnapping?

GRACE: I think that everything, anything is possible, but I don`t think that any of the evidence suggests that that happened. Marc Harrold, what do you make of it?

MARC HARROLD, FMR. OFFICER, ATLANTA PD; ATTORNEY: Yes, there`s absolutely no evidence. I mean, anything`s possible. This is a baffling case. Anything`s possible. The fact that they might have inquired about how to travel to Mexico with the children, that cuts one way, but the fact that they left with such haste seems to cut the other. So, it`s a baffling case, but there`s no indication that would lead to believe that the father had done something to the family.

GRACE: What do you think, Marc Klaas?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: I completely agree with that. You know, they didn`t take her passport which is expired, nor did they have the birth certificates of the children which would be necessary to come back into the country. And she`s exactly right about her concerns about the safety in Mexico. You know, Nancy, that there have been just about 35,000 killings in the U.S./Mexican border in the drug wars in the last four years alone. No sane individual wants to inject young children into that kind of an environment.

GRACE: I agree. Out to the lines. Stephanie in Maryland. Hi, Stephanie.

STEPHANIE, MARYLAND: Hi, Nancy. How are you?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

STEPHANIE: I`m just curious. I had two questions. Was that the only vehicle that they had? And also, they mentioned they were doing renovations. Was it possible that the husband had, like, hired outside help? That would come in and get to know them?

GRACE: Good question. Michael McStay, was it their only vehicle?

MCSTAY: No. It was not their only vehicle. It was their mid-sized SUV. And to answer the other part of that question, yes, they did have other people in there. They had a painter that vanished, and actually Summer was overseeing the remodel because Joey worked from home.

GRACE: So, the painter vanished?

MCSTAY: That`s right. That`s why MacGyver, an old family friend who actually introduced them, came down and was the last person to see them on Wednesday the 3rd, and he was supposed to come back and paint on Saturday, the 6th. That`s why some of the last text messages she got was actually from MacGyver saying, hey, are we still on? Am I coming down? But the first original painter which brought MacGyver in there was because he, you know, no-showed and just --

GRACE: And tell me, quickly, where`s the other family vehicle?

MCSTAY: The other family vehicle is actually at my house. I have it now.

GRACE: OK. So, that`s accounted for.

MCSTAY: Yes, ma`am.

GRACE: Very quickly --

MCSTAY: Another point is why didn`t they, you know, if they were going to go willfully, you know, most families that want to disappear, one, they liquidate their bank account. Two, they throw a bunch of gear and packing and et cetera into the back of the pickup truck. They throw the dogs in the back and off into the future they go, but that`s just not the case in this scenario.

GRACE: Not at all. Very quickly, everyone. We are going to California in the case of missing 4-year-old boy, Juliani Cardenas. Jean, fill us in on the latest.

CASAREZ: It was early this morning, Nancy, a water authority official was just doing his routine work at the Delta-Mendota Canal, and he saw the body of a young little boy floating on top. Authorities rushed to the scene. They were able to match the clothing of that little boy to Juliani Cardenas, and although, DNA testing is currently going on, autopsy was completed today. Authorities believe it is the body of Juliani Cardenas who was abducted from his grandmother January 18th.

GRACE: Jean, for those of our viewers that are not familiar with Juliani`s story, explain.

CASAREZ: Well, his grandmother had him that day on January 18th because he wasn`t feeling well and Jose Rodriguez, who was the ex-boyfriend and father figure for the little boy had gone all throughout the day to try to find him, and he finally found him that afternoon. Parked his car in the driveway, kept the doors open, took the baby out of the grandma`s arms. And then, it`s believed drove directly into a canal with himself and Juliani, but an arrest warrant has been issued. It`s an all-points bulletin to try to find Jose Rodriguez to arrest him for first-degree murder.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TABITHA CARDENAS, MOTHER OF JULIANI CARDENAS: Please, I need him home. I know Juliani, he`s telling him that he misses me and that he wants to come home and he needs to bring him home. She told me all she could do was hung on to him, and she finally let go.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Vinyette Teague was just a year and a half old when she vanished from her mom`s apartment in Chicago. She was never seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`m hoping in my heart that somebody just saw a pretty baby and just wanted a baby. And that, you know, they`ve taken good care of her through these years. And that she`s a beautiful young woman now. And I`m hoping that one day, that she may see herself on TV and say, hey, that looks like me. Or maybe somebody else may see her and say, hey, this looks like you.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Timeka Pridgen was last seen in Lagrange, North Carolina. At the time, she had braces on her teeth and light brown highlights in her hair. If you have any information, call 1-800-the lost.

Crystal Tymich was playing with her older siblings a few houses down the street in Los Angeles when she vanished. Her dad says he`ll always cherish his little girl.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Not one day goes by that I don`t think about her. I see little girls playing or doing things just reminds me of my daughter, and I get really choked up. I finally have learned to control not crying all day and all night. You learn to live with that after a while. Oh, my God. Oh, she was the sweetest little girl. I`d say, who`s my baby girl? And she`d say, me. And I`d say, who`s your daddy? She`d say you. And then, we`d give slap high fives, you know? One time she said, you`re my baby daddy and I was like, aw, that`s so cute.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Meredith Medina was last seen in her home in Midwest City, Oklahoma on Valentine`s Day 1989. She has a scar on the left side of her forehead and may wear (ph) glasses.

Bethanie Dougherty`s personal belongings in car were left behind when she disappeared from her New York State home in April, 2008. Help find Bethanie.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Wed Feb 02, 2011 11:11 am

February 2, 2011

Ali Lowitzer: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 09:59 AM ET

16-year-old Alexandria Lowitzer, known as Ali, was last seen on surveillance video getting off her bus just 3 houses down from her home.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Ali-lo10

Before she got on the bus she spoke to her mother about her plans to pick up her pay check from the burger barn just a half mile walk away from the bus stop. Other employees at the burger barn say Ali never made it there. Although Ali has been missing for almost a year, police still have her classified as a runaway. There is no sign of foul play but her family feels in their gut that something terrible has happened to their daughter.

Tipline: 866-898-5723
Reward: $10,000
Vanished: April 26, 2010
From: Spring, Texas
Classification: Runaway/Missing
Age: 16
Height: 5’2”
Weight: 145 lbs
Eyes: Hazel
Hair: Auburn (dyed dark red when she disappeared)
Defining Features:
-Faint scar from chickenpox between eyes
-Braces on upper & lower teeth
-Ears & nose pierced
Clothing:
-Black & white checkered pants
-Dark hoodie
-Checkered backpack




16-Year-Old Disappears in Spring, Texas

Aired February 2, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOHN LOWITZER, FATHER OF MISSING GIRL SCOUT: You kind of have a connection with your loved ones and your family, and you just feel when something`s not right, when something`s wrong. And that`s the feeling I got, something was wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): Girl Scout Ali Lowitzer spoke with her mom by cell phone to let her know that after she got off the school bus at her bus stop, she was going to walk to her job, the Burger Barn, to pick up her very first paycheck. But after Ali exits that bus she`s never seen or heard from again.

JOANN LOWITZER, MOTHER OF MISSING GIRL SCOUT: She checked in with me to let me know that she was going to ride the bus home and she was going to walk to work and pick up her paycheck. And that was the last that I talked to her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Investigators released images from a surveillance camera showing Ali getting off the bus that day, hoping to get new leads. But many of those leads have turned up empty.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: From our standpoint, the mere fact that she has had no communication with anybody that we know of makes it look like there`s a possibility of something having happened.

JOHN LOWITZER: You know, we think that there`s foul play. The unfortunate thing is that we don`t have any proof that there`s foul play, and we don`t have any proof that there`s not. Nobody has seen Ali since she got off of the bus.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Now the family is offering a $10,000 reward, hoping someone will come forward with the one clue that could bring Ali home.

JOHN LOWITZER: Just pray that she`s safe, wherever she is. And that`s the best I can hope for.

GRACE: If you could speak to her now, what is your message?

JOHN LOWITZER: My message to Ali right now would be, you know, baby, if you`re safe, if you`re watching this, just give us a call. Let us know that you`re OK. Set our hearts at ease. Set our minds at ease. And we can work through everything else. So if you`re out there, we just need to know you`re OK.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish, their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. For 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone. But where?

Tonight, live to Texas.

A Girl Scout calls her mom after school to let her know she`s taking the bus to work, pick up her check, then to walk straight home. Sixteen- year-old Ali, never seen alive again, even missing an "Alice in Wonderland" birthday party she had planned.

No cell phone calls, no text messages, nothing. But can grainy surveillance video images shed light on what happened to Ali? What clues could the last known images of the girl reveal tonight? Where is missing Girl Scout Ali Lowitzer?

Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, what happened didn`t happen that long ago. This is a very fresh case.

It was only nine months ago that Ali Lowitzer, 16 years old, braces on her top teeth and her bottom teeth, she got on the school bus April 26, 2010. She got off of the school bus. She was only 30 feet from her house, and then she was gone. She was missing. She was never seen again.

I want to go out to Joe Gomez, reporter, KTRH News Talk Radio in Houston.

When she got off the school bus on April 26th of last year, where was she going?

JOE GOMEZ, REPORTER, KTRH: Well, Jean, she was going to go to the Burger Barn, where Ali had worked to pick up her first paycheck. And between the school bus stop and the Burger Barn, something went terribly wrong because she vanished into thin air.

And police believe that perhaps Ali had run away from home, but the community and Ali`s parents can`t believe that. For one, she just vanished with the clothes on her back.

She was an avid texter. She didn`t take her phone charger from her house. She didn`t make it to the Burger Barn to pick up her paycheck. And she also left her purse at home, which contained $30. When you add all this circumstantial evidence together, it doesn`t make any sense that Ali would just run away of her own accord.

No, Jean, instead, it makes it appear that perhaps little beautiful Ali was taken.

CASAREZ: To Natisha Lance, NANCY GRACE producer.

This young 16-year-old had so much to look forward to. She was so involved in her community and her school.

What were some of the upcoming things that she was going to participate in?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: She did have so much to look forward to. As we said, Jean, she was in the choir, she played flute, she liked to draw. She had a birthday party that was coming up that she helped plan for a friend which was themed in "Alice in Wonderland." She also had a softball tournament that was upcoming.

Now, also, Jean, when she got off the bus, she sent a text message to a friend. Now, this was at 2:57 that she sent this text message. And she was making plans with that friend to come over to her home.

The friend wasn`t available to come over to the house, but that also shows that this does not seem like a girl who was planning to run away, if she was making plans to have a friend come over to her house.

CASAREZ: You know, Natisha, let`s talk like two girlfriends right now. Do you remember when you were that age, maybe a little older, and you got a paycheck? Like the first paycheck of the first job you ever had? What was that like?

LANCE: I do remember that. And I was excited to go get that paycheck. There was nothing that would have stood in the way of me getting that paycheck, because you feel like you have your own independence for once and you`re making your own money.

So it does seem extremely odd that she would not have made it to go get her paycheck. And people who were at the Burger Barn, other employees, said she didn`t make it there, even though she had told her mother that is where she was going.

And like you said, Jean, this was her first paycheck.

CASAREZ: Yes. It was a big, big deal.

We have some very special guests with us tonight that have gone through so much in the last nine months.

I want to welcome the parents of Ali Lowitzer, John and JoAnn Lowitzer.

Thank you so much for joining us from the Houston area.

We can`t imagine what you`ve gone through, but what we want you to do right now initially is to take us back to April 26, 2010 in the early morning hours. You all wake up. Take us back to your home that morning.

What happened?

JOANN LOWITZER: Well, that morning was just like any other morning. You know, we wake up and I fix her breakfast, and she rushes to get dressed and rushes to the bus.

CASAREZ: What did she say to you before she left the house?

JOANN LOWITZER: And that was the last I saw her. We just do like a checklist. You know, do you have this, do you have that? And she said, "Yeah, yeah, yeah."

CASAREZ: And what did she have with her?

JOANN LOWITZER: Her backpack and her school supplies. And that was it.

CASAREZ: So she goes to school, and then I`ll still ask you, JoAnn, you called her or she called you when school was finished that day?

JOANN LOWITZER: I had sent her a text and asked her if she`s going to go work, and I think it was a little too early, she was still in class. So when she got out of class, she called me before she got on to the bus and said that she was going to ride the bus to her normal stop, and she was going to walk to the Burger Barn to se if she could get -- if she got paid and if she could work.

CASAREZ: And she hadn`t had that job for very long, right?

JOANN LOWITZER: No, ma`am. She had just turned 16 in February. And it had just been maybe a month that she had had that job.

CASAREZ: We want to show everybody some video surveillance photos.

And John, maybe you can work us through these photos. The school bus actually had a video surveillance camera. Now, there`s Ali right there, right?

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes, the bus actually had video surveillance from the time that she got on the bus at school to the time she got off at her normal stop.

CASAREZ: So, everybody, you`re looking at Ali minutes from when she was never seen again.

Now, John, take it up from there. Didn`t she -- after she stepped off the school bus, didn`t she actually text a friend of hers? Because you found that later.

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes. According to her phone records, she was texting the whole time that she was on the bus, and as well as soon as she got off the bus. There are a few in and outs in her phone records. And like you said earlier, the last text that she sent out was about 2:57.

CASAREZ: So that corroborates with the school bus video, that she got off the school bus around 3:00.

Did anybody see her walking down the street toward the Burger Barn?

JOHN LOWITZER: Well, there were three other boys that got off at her stop that live on the same street that she does. When we talked to them, they said that she kind of lingered behind and they continued on to their homes.

And, you know, they didn`t think much of it. And she was just kind of staying behind and sending texts. And they had said that she was walking to the corner, which would lead her out of the neighborhood to walk down to the main -- to walk down the main street to get to the Burger Barn.

But, you know, they didn`t think anything of it. You know, they just kind of thought that she was hanging behind, and they went on home.

CASAREZ: Now, your daughter, who left all of her clothes behind, who left money behind in her room, literally had the clothes on her back with a backpack of books. The Houston Harris County Sheriff`s Department determined they believed she had voluntarily left?

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes. They have her classified as a runaway, basically for the simple fact that there`s no evidence of foul play.

CASAREZ: No evidence of foul play. But there`s evidence of everything else that was left behind.

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes, there`s evidence of everything else. And common sense would tell you and us being her parents would know that it was very uncharacteristic of her. If she was planning to do something like that, she would take some of the creature comforts of home.

But obviously, you know, like you said earlier, she left her cell phone charger behind, her money. She left her purse.

JOANN LOWITZER: Makeup.

JOHN LOWITZER: Makeup. Anything that was important to her is still in her room.

CASAREZ: All right.

We are taking your calls tonight.

To Marcia in Pennsylvania.

Hi, Marcia.

MARCIA, PENNSYLVANIA: Hi, Jean. Thank you for taking my call.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

MARCIA: I actually -- my question was already answered, but I do have another one. If she had her backpack and cell phone with her, did they find that anywhere? And also, if it was a stranger abduction, don`t you think the backpack would be the least of their worries? It makes you wonder if it was somebody at her work.

Do they know for -- have they talked to all the employees there?

CASAREZ: Well, let`s go out to Dawn Davis after our commercial break. She`s the senior case manager for Laura Recovery Center who came in to help these parents when law enforcement decided she was a runaway. Laura Recovery Center said no, she`s not a runaway, she was taken.

We`ll be back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOANN LOWITZER: I send her a text every night before I go to bed, just hoping that sometime I`ll get a reply.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Sixteen-year-old Ali Lowitzer was last seen getting off the school bus just three doors down from her home on April 26, 2010. While on the bus, she told her mother she was going to stop off at her job to pick up her paycheck. She never arrived at the burger joint where she worked and hasn`t been seen since.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There was always that lingering fear that something`s very wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Ali`s family, now offering a reward for information leading to her whereabouts, say they`re desperate for more resources to find their missing daughter.

GRACE: This is a good, sweet girl. She`s a 16-year-old Girl Scout. Please help bring Ali home.

JOHN LOWITZER: And sometimes you lose a little bit of faith in the evil things that are out there. But then again, you kind of gain a sense of -- I don`t know what the word would be.

JOANN LOWITZER: Humanity.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: And she had planned a birthday party for her best friend that following weekend. It was the "Alice in Wonderland" theme. And she had planned it all.

And you walk away from that? You just leave?

I want to go out to Dawn Drexel (sic), who is with us. Dawn Davis. She is the senior case manager from Laura Recovery Center who stepped in because they did not believe she was a runaway.

Dawn Davis, thank you very much for joining us out of Friendswood, Texas, this afternoon.

First of all, why did you decide to get involved in this case?

DAWN DAVIS, SR. CASE MANAGER, LAURA RECOVERY CENTER: Well, after talking to JoAnn and John Lowitzer, we felt that it was very unlikely that a young lady such as Ali would leave behind everything that she knows and that she loved. She was active in her sports. She was always on the phone text messaging. You could see a dramatic, abrupt end to those text messages.

She had a paycheck waiting for her, and she didn`t pick it up. She left everything behind that she loved.

CASAREZ: And she had never run away before or tried to run away, correct?

DAVIS: Not that I`m aware of, no.

CASAREZ: Dawn, why do you think the Houston authorities, including the Harris County Sheriff`s Department, determined she was a runaway?

DAVIS: You know, I think that it was just based on lack of any other explanation. I know that when she got off that bus, all communication with her stopped, as well as did the information about any eyewitnesses to what happened next.

CASAREZ: To John and JoAnn Lowitzer, parents of Ali Lowitzer, who are joining us tonight.

John, it would be wonderful if she was a runaway because she might be alive. She would be alive if she ran away. But all of the facts here just counter against that.

What do you think happened?

JOHN LOWITZER: Well, I agree, you know, that it would be best if she was a runaway and that she was somewhere, and where she wanted to be, and that she was safe. But I just don`t see that in her.

I just don`t see her just up and leaving everything behind. She`s not that kind of person.

She`s very -- she was a very homebody person. You know, she liked her creature comforts of home.

So, you know, there`s so many things that we could speculate that happened. But, you know, I still fear that the worst has happened. But I`ve got to hope that, you know, that she`s still OK and that she`s out there somewhere.

CASAREZ: Did she have a Facebook account, a MySpace account? Did you find that she was communicating with anyone on those social networks?

JOHN LOWITZER: We did find with the help of our private investigator that she had a Facebook account and she had six different MySpace accounts, but none of them had any activity since early-to-mid-March.

JOANN LOWITZER: We didn`t have a home computer at the time.

CASAREZ: OK. How do you think she did Facebook and MySpace, then?

JOANN LOWITZER: During spring break, she stayed with a friend of mine so that she could stay home and work while I went to visit relatives out of state. So I do know for a couple of days during that week she did get on her accounts.

CASAREZ: I want to go out to Andrew Scott. He is the former chief of police of Boca Raton, Florida, currently vice president of Scott-Roberts and Associates, joining us out of Miami.

We have learned that Houston, Texas, and the Harris County Sheriff`s Department, they do not have criteria to determine who would be a runaway, a profile, and who would be someone that was abducted, taken. This is just a subjective determination, right? When you have 6,000 to 9,000 missing people in a city per year, there`s a lot of subjectivity here while a family just waits, not knowing what happened.

ANDREW SCOTT, SCOTT-ROBERTS & ASSOCIATES: You`re exactly right, Jean. And that subjectivity clearly creates a lot of problems, and it takes away from the ability of an officer who arrives on the scene of this type of a call.

And clearly, they want to make this less than what it could possibly be. And that`s where these types of cases fall into a black hole, so to speak.

It`s very troubling. Law enforcement should not take a complacent attitude toward these types of cases. Runaways are epidemic, but missing children and homicides are even more epidemic.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN LOWITZER: You kind of have a connection with your loved ones and your family, and you just feel when something`s not right, when something`s wrong. And that`s the feeling I got. Something was wrong

(END VIDEO CLIP) .

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOHN LOWITZER: Baby, if you`re safe, if you`re watching this, just give us a call. You know, let us know that you`re OK.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Ali Lowitzer`s parents haven`t stopped looking for their 16-year-old daughter who went missing nine months ago after stepping off a school bus.

JOANN LOWITZER: According to the phone records, she would text about 4,000 a month.

JOHN LOWITZER: For that to just stop is baffling.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A $10,000 reward now offered. Who would want to harm a Girl Scout with so much promise?

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: Ali Lowitzer was a catcher on her high school`s softball team. An important game was coming up. She wasn`t there because she was gone. Another reason why she wouldn`t leave on her own.

I want to go out, though, to her parents, John and JoAnn Lowitzer, who have been kind enough to join us tonight.

Police did search your daughter`s bedroom, is that correct?

JOHN LOWITZER: They did.

CASAREZ: And they found something, a journal of some of her writings. What were in those writings that may have made them believe she was a runaway?

JOHN LOWITZER: Well, she had several journals that she was writing in, and there was an old one that they found that was put up on a shelf in her bookcase, and there was a little note in there that said she was going to run away and that we wouldn`t be able to find her. I don`t remember the exact wording, but that`s pretty much the gist of it.

JOANN LOWITZER: She`d be back in a couple of days and she`d be fine.

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes.

JOANN LOWITZER: But it was in a spiral notebook. It wasn`t in one of her regular journals that she wrote in every day.

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes. It was not a current journal that she kept.

CASAREZ: Do you think that based on that one writing, that that is why they made the determination to virtually not help you in your search for your daughter?

JOHN LOWITZER: I think once they found that, they just kind of threw it up and said, well, obviously this proves right here that she ran away. And we pleaded with them and we told them that that`s an old journal, she hasn`t written in that journal, you know, for at least a year or two.

And you can tell the handwriting between that journal entry and what she was currently writing. The handwriting is completely different. Her handwriting progressed from that time.

CASAREZ: To Paula Bloom, clinical psychologist, joining us tonight out of Atlanta.

How many children have visions and fantasies that they`re going to run away from home, and how many people actually do it?

PAULA BLOOM, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: And you make such a good point, Jean. We have thoughts all the time about things. I don`t think it`s an uncommon thought at all.

What matters is what you do. Was there a plan? Really, what`s important here is our action, not so much about what we`re thinking.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOANN LOWITZER: According to the phone records, she would text about 4,000 a month.

JOHN LOWITZER: For that to just stop is baffling.

JOANN LOWITZER: I send her a text every night before I go to bed, and just hoping that some time I`ll get a reply.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

(SINGING)

JOHN LOWITZER, FATHER OF ALI LOWITZER: You kind of have a connection with your loved ones and your family, and you just feel when something`s not right, when something`s wrong. And that`s the feeling I got. Something was wrong.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Girl scout, Ali Lowitzer, spoke with her mom by cell phone to let her know that after she got off the school bus at her bus stop, she was going to walk to her job, the burger barn, to pick up her very first paycheck. But after Ali exits that bus, she`s never seen or heard from again.

JOANN LOWITZER, MOTHER OF ALI LOWITZER: She checked in with me to let me know that she was going to ride the bus home, and she was going to walk to work and pick up her paycheck. And that was the last that I talked to her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Investigators released images from a surveillance camera showing Ali getting off the bus that day hoping to get new leads. But many of those leads have turned up empty.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: From our standpoint, the mere fact that she has had no communication with anybody that we know of makes it look like there`s a possibility of something having happened.

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes, we think that there`s foul play. The unfortunate thing is we don`t have any proof that there`s foul play, and we don`t have any proof that there`s not. Nobody has seen Ali since she got off of the bus.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now, the family`s offering a $10,000 reward, hoping someone will come forward with the one clue that could bring Ali home.

JOHN LOWITZER: Just pray that she`s safe, wherever she is. And that`s the best I can hope for.

(SINGING)

GRACE: If you could speak to her now, what is your message?

JOHN LOWITZER: My message to Ali right now would be, baby, if you`re safe, if you`re watching this, just give us a call, you know? Let us know that you`re OK. Set our hearts at ease, set our minds at ease, and we can work through everything else. So, if you`re out there, we just need to know you`re OK.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, for 50 nights, we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone, but where?

Tonight, live to Texas, a girl scout calls her mom after school to let her know she`s taking the bus to work, pick up her check, then to walk straight home. Sixteen-year-old Ali never seen alive again. Even missing an Alice in Wonderland birthday party she had planned. No cell phone calls, no text messages, nothing. But can grainy surveillance video images shed light on what happened to Ali? What clues could the last known images of the girl reveal tonight? Where is missing girl scout, Ali Lowitzer? Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": April 26th, 2010. It was nine months ago. She went to school, she got on the school bus to come home, and the surveillance photo showed she was on that bus. It showed she got off that bus at about 3:00 p.m. She was so close to her home, but you know what? She wanted to pick up her first paycheck. She`d even told her mother she was going to go pick up her first paycheck. I want to go out to Natisha Lance, Nancy Grace producer. Ali lived on her cell phone, right?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: She did. She would send about 3,000 texts per month, Jean. So, it`s so interesting that after this day, no text, no phone calls, no correspondence on Facebook, no correspondence on MySpace. And also, Jean, when she got off of the bus, she sent another text. It was at 2:57. She sent it to a friend of hers, asking the friend to come over. The friend wasn`t able to come over to her house, but that just shows that she was making plans for after she picked up her paycheck, for a friend to come over to her house, which goes against her being a runaway.

CASAREZ: But yet, the Houston authorities determined they believed she voluntarily left. And so, it`s been the responsibility of her parents, who are with us tonight, to try to find her and locate her. John and Joann Lowitzer joining us tonight from Houston, Texas. Now, this was Spring, Texas where this all happened. Your daughter went to what high school? Spring High School?

JOANN LOWITZER: Spring High School.

CASAREZ: Right. Now, your daughter loved the phone, text constantly, 3,000 texts a month, we understand. Were you able, through your private investigator, to read some of those texts in the months before she went missing?

JOANN LOWITZER: No, ma`am. The phone provider does not back up the data to be able to store the physical messages. All we were able to retrieve was dates and times and phone numbers.

CASAREZ: Dates and times and phone numbers. Did you see anything unusual out of state? Did you call all those phone numbers?

JOANN LOWITZER: Oh, yes. With the help of Dawn from the Laura Recovery Center, we sat down an entire day and went through the phone records and made phone calls and identified a lot of the numbers and talked to a lot of her friends.

CASAREZ: Let`s go out to the callers. Jeanne in North Carolina. Hi, Jean.

JEANNE, NORTH CAROLINA: Hey, Jean. Born in Atlanta have the same passes as Nancy news told these cases (ph). Did she have a boyfriend? And did she ever make it to that burger joint?

CASAREZ: That`s a really good question. Did she have a boyfriend? To Joann Lowitzer, she actually had a little boyfriend come over to your house that weekend before she went missing, right?

JOANN LOWITZER: Yes, ma`am. He spent most of the day Sunday with us the day before she went missing. And after he left, you know, we had a little chat about him, and she did confirm that it was her new boyfriend. And he was actually the first place that I went to when we discovered that she didn`t make it to work.

CASAREZ: And what did he say?

JOANN LOWITZER: He had also been trying to reach her by calling her cell phone and texting her, and he didn`t receive a response, either.

CASAREZ: All right. And to Jeanne in North Carolina, no, she never made it to the Burger King. To Pat Brown, criminal profiler and author of "The Profiler," joining us from Washington, D.C. What are your thoughts? Is this a runaway situation? Do you somebody who voluntarily left without a dime in her pocket?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: I`ve never seen a case that looks less like a runaway situation. That the police would say because they didn`t have evidence of foul play, it didn`t happen. How many times have we seen a woman, girl just go missing off the street, somebody simply grabs her, throws her in a vehicle, she`s gone? Unless, she, like, drops her phone on the street, and it gets smashed, you won`t see that anything happened? Even if you drop the phone, somebody coming along goes oh, look, a free telephone.

They could simply take that away. So, just because there`s no evidence doesn`t mean anything. Also, she could have voluntarily gotten into somebody`s car she knew just to chat or say I`ll take you up to the burger joint and that person drove off with her. Again, no sign of foul play. So, I mean, this girl has no history in her background. She`s got a wonderful life. She`s involved in a lot of activities. Usually, when we see runaways, we see a problem with authority.

They`re having all kinds of difficulties. They`re running around with all kinds of boys. They`re into drugs. And we see that. We see that on the Facebook pages and MySpace pages. We see nothing with this girl at all.

CASAREZ: And we see none of that here. To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation. Marc, listen to this. Let`s look at the facts. Do you know that another young girl in the same area was almost abducted shortly before Ali went missing? Someone tried to grab her from the neck. She bit the man, and she got away. Your thoughts.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, Jean, I think you made a very good point earlier about law enforcement having criteria to determine if a child is a runaway or not. It could be as simple as a series of questions to determine their propensity for running away. Obviously, this is a girl that most likely did not run away. But there`s another common thread. There`s another thread that we see regarding school bus stops and children disappearing from school bus stops. And I think that there are probably solutions to that problem.

CASAREZ: It`s a really good point. We`ll talk more about that tonight.

Please help us find a missing young girl named April Pennington. She is 15 years old, and she vanished on May 29th of 1996 from Montville, Connecticut. She`s 5`2", 100 pounds, with brown hair and hazel eyes. If you have any question, please call 860-848-6531.

If your loved one`s missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Live to Texas. A girl scout calls her mom after school to let her know she`s taking the bus to work, pick up her check, then to walk straight home. Sixteen-year-old Ali, never seen alive again. Even missing an Alice in Wonderland birthday party she had planned. No cell phone calls. No text messages. Nothing. But can grainy surveillance video images shed light on what happened to Ali? What clues could the last known images of the girl reveal tonight? Where is missing girl scout, Ali Lowitzer?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: More details emerge in the case of a missing Texas girl scout last seen getting off the school bus just blocks from her own home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We think there`s foul play.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: However, Ali`s family is sure that she was kidnapped or is being held against her will.

JOHN LOWITZER: The unfortunate thing is we don`t have any proof that there is foul play, and we don`t have any proof that there`s not.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The mere fact that she has had no communication with anybody that we know of makes it look like there`s a possibility of something having happened.

GRACE: No activity on her cell phone. No text messages at all. No use of a credit card or an ATM.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The video reportedly shows her leaving the bus just 30 feet from her own home. That`s the last time anyone saw Ali. Ali`s parents say they`ve had no contact with her since she was last seen, and there`s been no activity on her cell phone.

JOANN LOWITZER: She was going to walk to work and pick up her paycheck. And that was the last that I talked to her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. Marc Klaas makes a fantastic point in regard to school buses and how many children are abducted when they get off the bus so close to their homes. Let`s go out to the lawyers. Randy Kessler, defense attorney, joining us out of Atlanta tonight and Peter Elikann, defense attorney and author of "Super Predators" out of Boston.

To Randy Kessler, you know, in all the cases that I`ve covered and the cases that we`ve had here on Nancy`s show, what happens is predators watch the patterns of these children as they are walking home, as they`re walking off the bus, and it is a crime of opportunity. Your thoughts.

RANDY KESSLER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: My thoughts are if it is a crime, if it`s not a runaway situation, it maybe the perfect crime, maybe by accident or maybe by intent. But if someone out there is watching and has anything to do with this or knows about it, things catch up with people, and there`s still a chance to save yourself and save her. But, you know, it may just very well be a unique opportunity, someone was driving by or somebody planned it out perfectly. But they will be caught sooner or later.

CASAREZ: Peter Elikann joining us tonight from Boston, defense attorney. What is ludicrous in this situation is her parents are having to finance every bit of search to find their daughter. There`s something wrong with that when she leaves with just the clothes on her back and left her life behind.

PETER ELIKANN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: That`s true. You know, if she was to -- if the police were declaring this investigation as an abduction, then all kinds of resources suddenly come in, crime stoppers and the FBI, et cetera. That said these poor people are stuck having to do their own self- financed search for her and do their own little bake sales or fund-raisers, and it really is outrageous. I don`t know why the police are so dug in on the idea that -- look, we`ve looked into the idea that she could be a runaway. That hasn`t worked. Why don`t we look into something else? Why leave any stone unturned here? I don`t know what`s going on here with this police department.

CASAREZ: You`re so right, Peter, because the FBI would have come in. The state authorities would have come in. Thank goodness for the Laura Recovery Center. With us tonight is Dawn Davis. She is the senior case manager who has been in charge of this case. Dawn, you had a search this weekend for Ali, didn`t you? Where did you go? And did you find anything that you can tell police?

VOICE OF DAWN DAVIS, SR. CASE MANGER, LAURA RECOVER CENTER: That`s correct. We went and searched again over some areas behind Ali`s house just simply to make sure that nothing had been missed on prior searches.

CASAREZ: Were you able to take scent dogs initially when you got going last April to the bus stop? And did you find anything through those scent dogs?

DAVIS: We did. We had dog teams, ATV teams, horse teams, foot searchers. We did door-to-door canvassing, flyer distribution. And the dog team did follow her scent back to the home, however, they could not tell that that wasn`t a trap that may have been laid earlier.

CASAREZ: Right. An earlier scent. Let`s go out to her parents again, John and Joann Lowitzer joining us tonight from Houston, Texas. We know that your daughter`s birthday is tomorrow. And that is going to be very, very difficult for you. We want to help find your daughter. We want everybody to look at the picture of Ali Lowitzer. Can you just describe her to us physically? Her hair color, what it might be now? Are there any birth marks on her or anything identifiable?

JOHN LOWITZER: At the time of her disappearance, her hair was died auburn. She had braces on her upper and lower teeth with pink bands. She has a small chicken pox scar between her eyes. She has a piercing in her nose. She`s about 5`2", 145 pounds. She was last seen wearing black-and- white checkered skinny jeans, a white T-shirt, dark gray hoodie, and her backpack was very brightly colored and checkered as well. And she had on black, solid black skate type shoes, kind of like Vans or DCs.

CASAREZ: Joann, if she can hear you tonight, what do you want to tell her or who she may be with?

JOANN LOWITZER: I want to tell her that I love her and miss her. And if there is somebody that took her that is watching this, then to let somebody know where she is. We just need to know that she`s OK.

CASAREZ: Ali Lowitzer, 16 years old. Her birthday is tomorrow. 5`2", 145 pounds, hazel eyes, auburn hair, and she wears braces on the top and the bottom. That`s an identifying mark right there, those braces. Want to go out to the callers. Chelsea in California. Hi, Chelsea.

CHELSEA, CALIFORNIA: Hi. How are you?

CASAREZ: Fine. Thank you for calling.

CHELSEA: Thanks. I had a question. Has her backpack or credit cards or anything, cell phone maybe, been located? And I know you said that the credit cards haven`t been used, but I just was curious if they`ve been located.

CASAREZ: OK. Good question. To John Lowitzer, she was only 16. Did she even have a credit card?

JOHN LOWITZER: She didn`t have any credit cards. There`s been no activity with her Social Security card. We have not located her cell phone. We have not located her backpack. Her cell phone does have GPS on it, and we constantly check to see if that GPS has been turned on. And the last place it`s showing is actually at the bus stop.

CASAREZ: Hmm. So, that check, she never picked up that check, and that paycheck was one of the first paychecks she`d ever gotten, right?

JOHN LOWITZER: Yes. She`d worked there for about a month, and she had been paid a couple times before, but she was going to walk up to work and see if she can collect her paycheck and work that night.

CASAREZ: What about it, Mrs. Lowitzer? No activity on her cell phone. What did she say when she spoke to you that day?

JOANN LOWITZER: She checked in with me to let me know that she was going to ride the bus home, and she was going to walk to work and pick up her paycheck. And that was the last that I talked to her.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother, disappears. Their families left behind, wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Elissa Martin is an endangered missing adult. She was last seen at a family member`s home in Campbellton, Florida. Elissa has a medical condition and needs medication. Call 850-482-9648 if you have a tip.

Adriana Rojas disappeared from Rowland Heights, California. She has a birthmark on her left leg and a mole on her left hand.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was very happy. She was very active. She worked hard at school, at home, and she was so clean. She liked to be everything perfect. Her room, she would keep her room so nice and clean. I want her to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Call 1-800-the-lost with information.

Melissa Alaniz was last seen in 1987. She was leaving her home to walk to a nearby convenience store. Melissa reportedly was wearing an iron maiden T-shirt and jeans.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The police said that she went to -- to a video - - to play videos. Probably like at a 7-11. There were a lot of young girls missing from this area. You know, they found several of those girls. She was a very happy child. And, of course, you know, she was loved by everybody. And I don`t understand, you know, why she won`t call.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END




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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:35 pm

Michaela Garecht: Nancy Grace America's Missing
Posted: 12:10 AM ET


With five dollars in their pockets Michaela and a friend rode their scooters to a market to purchase candy, soda and beef jerky.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Garech10

While inside the store the girls left the scooters outside by the door. When the girls walked out of the store they began to walk back home forgetting they had rode their scooters. It was not long before the girls realized their mistake and went back to the school to fetch their scooters, but Michaela’s scooter was missing. The girls split up to try to find it. Placed next to a car Michaela found the scooter. As she bent down to pick up the scooter a white male grabbed her from behind and forced her into his sedan. There was one witness to the abduction – Michaela’s 9-year-old friend. For 22 years Michaela’s case has gone unsolved.

Tipline: 800-222-3999
Reward: $60,000
Missing Since: 11/19/88
Missing From: Hayward, CA
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 9
Height: 4’8”
Weight: 75 lbs
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Blonde
Clothing:
-White t-shirt w/ “Metro” printed on the front & images of people imprinted on midsection
-Denim pants rolled above the knees
-Flesh-colored nylon stockings
-White anklet socks
-Black cloth shoes w/ plastic soles
-Three-inch-long pearl or white-colored earring that resembled feathers



Who Took Michaela Garecht?

Aired February 3, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

SHARON MURCH, MICHAELA GARECHT`S MOTHER: A week before Michaela was kidnapped she woke up at 5:00 in the morning and sat down at the coffee table and wrote a poem. She told me that she had written it about people who had been kidnapped and who were being held captive. It has always seemed to me like it must be some sort of a prophecy or premonition.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): It was supposed to be a quick trip, friends taking their scooters to the local market to buy candy and soda. But 9-year-old Michaela Joy Garecht never came back.

MURCH: If Michaela hasn`t seen the effort to get her back, she will see, and she`ll know how much we love and care about her, and how much everybody else out there cares about her, too.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Michaela Joy Garecht and her friend hopped on their scooters Saturday morning to go buy soda, beef jerky, and taffy at the local convenience store. After buying the snacks, the girls realized one scooter is missing.

MURCH: Michaela spotted it in a parking lot next to a car and went to get it. And when she bent over to pick up the scooter, a man jumped out of the car, grabbed her from behind, threw her into the car, and took off with her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police track down lead after lead without success, but investigators don`t stop trying to find Michaela.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s a tremendous effort. And the 16 years that I`ve been with the police department, I`ve never seen the community come together like this.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP (singing): You better watch out you better not cry --

MURCH: We had some really strong leads over the years. And we have a number of things in the investigation that I still have questions about. But I do think that, perhaps, my daughter might still be alive and might come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you see a girl, you know, at a gas station, in a car or something that looks like Michaela, or vaguely resembles her, just walk up to the car and say, "Are you Michaela?"

MURCH: I keep hearing the words that she said. It`s about people who are kidnapped and being held captive, not people who were kidnapped and were killed. An amazing poem for a 9-year-old.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. Fifty nights, we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. Gone, but where?

Tonight, it was a Saturday morning, San Francisco, California, suburbs. Nine-year-old Michaela Garecht and her little friend drive their scooters to buy snacks -- soft drinks, candy. Now, when they come out of the convenience store, the scooter`s gone.

The girls split up to go searching. Suddenly, the little friend hears screaming and actually sees Michaela being forced into a car. The driver, a male, speeds away.

Tonight, who took 9-year-old Michaela?

Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": It was the Saturday before Thanksgiving, Nancy, November 19, 1988. And Michaela and her little girlfriend, they were so excited because the supermarket was just a couple blocks away. But they rode their scooters.

Michaela had never done that before. She`d never gone to the market. And they went inside and they got soda, beef jerky and Laffy Taffy. And they came out and they started home, and then they realized, oh, no, we forgot the scooters.

I want to go to Henry Lee, reporter for the "San Francisco Chronicle," joining us tonight from San Francisco, author of "Presumed Dead."

What happened, Henry, when they went back to try to find those scooters?

HENRY LEE, REPORTER, "SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE": Well, Michaela went and realized her scooter wasn`t where she had left it. And she did see the scooter a couple feet down near a car. And when she went to pick it up, a man came out from behind, snatched her, and took her into the car and drove away.

And her friend and mother and the rest of the world have not seen Michaela since. Very, very tragic case, indeed.

CASAREZ: So, her little friend, when she saw this and heard this, ran back into the supermarket, Henry. And who did she go to and what happened then?

LEE: Well, she did make a 911 call that, herself, this little girl, did not hear for many, many years until later within she was on a news program. Very traumatic, to have a little girl see her best friend just kidnapped by a stranger in broad daylight in Hayward, California. Very upsetting, indeed.

CASAREZ: All right, everybody. I think we have got that 911 call. This is from 1988, when Michaela Garecht was reported missing from that supermarket.

Take a listen.

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

DISPATCHER: What`s your emergency?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. Yes, we need a police car here right away. We had just kidnapped --

DISPATCHER: What happened?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He picked up a little girl.

DISPATCHER: Do you know who the little girl is?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her friend is right here. She was with a friend.

DISPATCHER: All right. How old are they?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: How old are you?

She`s 8. How old was your friend?

She was 9.

DISPATCHER: Did you see what kind of car they were in?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I had seen it earlier. It was a white guy. He was hippy-like. I had seen him drive by. But she says it`s kind of like a brownish, burgundy car.

DISPATCHER: A brownish, burgundy car?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes. I think it was more burgundy.

DISPATCHER: Which way did it go?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Which way did it go?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don`t know. I saw it go --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It went down -- what`s that street right there? Tamarac?

DISPATCHER: Down by Tamarac?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Uh-huh.

DISPATCHER: And it turned on Tamarac?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Uh-huh. It`s going towards -- probably like up towards Whipple or something.

DISPATCHER: Up Whipple or Tamarac?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Down Tamarac.

DISPATCHER: OK. The Mission Boulevard is right in front of you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Right.

DISPATCHER: It went south on Mission and it made a turn at the lights?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No, there`s no lights. We`re right down here at Rainbow Market, right here at the grocery store.

DISPATCHER: Yes, I know. I know Rainbow Market, but where did it -- all right, so they just saw it going south on Mission?

DISPATCHER: Right, she had just seen it leave and she was really scared. She just came in.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

CASAREZ: That is chilling.

We are taking your calls live tonight. And we are very grateful to be joined tonight with the mother of Michaela Garecht, who is joining us from San Francisco, California, Sharon Murch.

Sharon, thank you so much for coming on tonight. I have so many questions to ask you, but first want to know, how did you find out that Michaela went missing?

MURCH: I was in the kitchen washing the breakfast dishes, and Michaela hadn`t been gone for very long, not long enough for me to worry about her. And I heard shouting outside.

And Michaela`s dad was working on the car in the driveway, and he came into the house and poked his head in the kitchen, and said, "Somebody snatched Michaela up at the market. I`m going up there."

And Trina (ph), Michaela`s friend, had called her father from the market, and he had driven by and had told Michaela`s dad. I had no idea what it meant, that Michaela was snatched. I could not possibly imagine that somebody had actually taken her and left with her.

But I called 911. And when I did, they -- I said, "Somebody said my daughter was snatched at the market." And they said, "Are you Mrs. Garecht?" And that`s when I knew that something really bad had happened.

CASAREZ: The little friend that Michaela was with, which was I think her best friend in the whole world, she was the only one that saw what happened, right?

MURCH: Yes, she is.

CASAREZ: And initially, the 911 call that we just heard was made from the grocery store attendant.

MURCH: Right. That`s true.

CASAREZ: As the days went on, was Michaela`s friend interviewed? And they believed that some erroneous information had gone out over that 911 call as far as descriptions?

MURCH: Yes. The initial description was that it was a burgundy- colored car. And when they sat down and questioned Trina (ph), actually later that day, they asked her about it, and she said, "Well, what`s burgundy?" And it turned out that it was more of a tannish-gold or butterscotch-colored car. So, in those early -- in those early moments when everybody was out looking for her, they were looking for the wrong color car.

CASAREZ: And what was the description of the abductor that Trina (ph) gave to authorities?

MURCH: She said that he was 18 to early 20s, that he had long, stringy dark blonde hair, severe acne, almost like boils. And she said -- she described his eyes as being very striking. She said they were like fox eyes. She said, "He looked right at me, but he didn`t see me."

CASAREZ: All right.

And everybody, we have got the lead investigator on this very active case. But first, we want you to listen to another part of that 911 call.

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

DISPATCHER: And it was a white male?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, it was a white male.

It was a white guy, huh?

OK. It was a white guy, kind of like dirty-ish blonde hair. He had a mustache, White. All I could see was him sitting down in the car. I had seen him drive by.

DISPATCHER: OK. Now, on the car, is it a sedan-style car, station wagon?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No, it`s kind of --

DISPATCHER: Four door?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It looked like it was four door, kind of a like a burgundy car. But it`s dirty.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

CASAREZ: All right. I want to go to Rob Lampkin, who is the lead investigator on this case. He`s joining us from Hayward, California, Hayward Police Department.

Inspector Lampkin, thank you very much for joining us.

How active is this case right now?

ROB LAMPKIN, INSPECTOR, HAYWARD POLICE DEPT.: Well, this case has always been an active case, and it`s just very much in the hearts of anyone who -- in Hayward who were -- the police, the whole community. You know, Michaela, she could be anyone`s child in this community. And it`s always been an active case. We never considered it a cold case.

CASAREZ: How many persons of interest have you had in the last years?

LAMPKIN: Well, thousands. We continue to get tips, you know, every month.

We`ve had, you know, ourselves, over 13,000 tips. A lot of them are very viable.

The FBI, as well, has another couple thousand. And we are working to consolidate those leads.

Because if you know back then, nothing was really computerized or anything. So now a big step we`re taking now is to consolidate everything where we can cross-reference all of the thousands of leads that have come in.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: FBI agents brought in football star Joe Montana and his wife, Jennifer, a television celebrity, to ask for the public`s help.

JOE MONTANA, FOOTBALL PLAYER: You people out there are the most important. The FBI, the local police can only do so much. They need other people`s eyes. And if you see something suspicious, please call.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

MURCH: All we`re asking is that he drop her off on a corner somewhere where there is a phone nearby, and tell her to wait five minutes so he can get out of there before she calls home. And we can go and get her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The missing girl is Michaela Garecht, 9 years old, in the fourth grade, scheduled to sing solo in the Christmas pageant.

MURCH: If Michaela is out there and can hear me, I want her to know that I would like her to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There was nothing complicated about this kidnapping. It was a straight snatch.

DISPATCHER: What`s your emergency?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi, yes. We need a police car here right away. We had just a kidnap.

DISPATCHER: What happened?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He picked up a little girl.

DISPATCHER: Do you know who the little girl is?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her friend is right here. She was with a friend.

MURCH: She went with her friend to the neighborhood market on a Saturday morning. They rode scooters up there. And when they went inside, they left the scooters outside the door. When they came out, one of the scooters was not where they left it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A few feet away, a man was holding the scooter and said, "Come over here. You can get it." When she approached him, he grabbed her, threw her in the car, drove away.

MURCH: The car that Michaela was kidnapped in was described as a tannish or possibly with primer on it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was afraid that she was going to get in trouble for losing somebody else`s scooter. And when it was found, she said, "Oh, boy." They found the scooter, so she ran over to get it, and he grabbed her.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

Michaela Garecht, she wasn`t by herself. She was with her little girlfriend when they went into the supermarket to buy their soda and their candy and their beef jerky.

But when they came out, one scooter was still there, but the other scooter was gone. It was by a car, and that is how it is believed Michaela Garecht was lured into the car by an abductor.

I want to go to her mother, who`s with us tonight. Sharon Murch, the mother of Michaela Garecht, joining us from San Francisco.

Sharon, I want everybody to know exactly where this happened, because many people are watching tonight. And this was in Hayward, California. What was the name of the supermarket at the time?

MURCH: At the time the supermarket was called Rainbow Market, and at this time it`s called Mexico Super.

CASAREZ: You know, to Rob Lampkin, the lead investigator of this case, joining us from San Francisco, Hayward Police Department.

You know, what surprises me is, I looked on a calendar, and this was the Saturday before Thanksgiving. That`s normally such a busy, busy day with so many people, but, yet, as interviews were done and people were tried -- the witnesses were tried to be found, only her little friend was the one that really saw what happened.

LAMPKIN: And that`s correct. I guess the -- either witnesses didn`t stay around, or anyone might not have saw what happened. Or it just was a day where, I mean, no one was paying attention.

People weren`t aware of what was going on around them, or aware of their surroundings. And I think that`s a problem. People don`t -- people are just narrow-minded and they do what they`re doing, and they`re not aware of everything that`s going on around them. And that could have been a problem back then.

CASAREZ: You know, you talk about all the persons of interests that you have had through the years. You still have persons of interest. I understand you even have a top five list.

Well, I`ll tell you who stands out to me. It`s someone that I think a lot of us are familiar with. It is a kidnapping case that was major news a few years ago, the case of Phillip Garrido, who allegedly kidnapped Jaycee Dugard 18 years before.

But to Rob Lampkin, our research shows us that Phillip Garrido was about 16 miles away from where Michaela was abducted. He was in a halfway house in 1988 on December 19th.

Is that correct?

LAMPKIN: I can`t really comment on El Dorado County`s case, but I`ve seen a timeline. And, you know, the property that was searched that everyone knows in Antioch is only probably about 30 miles away from where we are, but it`s -- what the Garrido case, with the Phillip Garrido, we`re in a holding pattern with that, because, understandably, El Dorado County, they`re getting ready to take their case to trial against Phillip and Nancy Garrido.

And they`re keeping a lot of information close, understandably, because they don`t want to compromise their case. But, you know, we haven`t -- like I said, we`re in a holding pattern. There`s not a whole lot we can do at this point but wait for that case is done.

CASAREZ: And by the way, everybody, today in court, Phillip Garrido was found to be competent to stand trial in the kidnapping of Jaycee Dugard, who lived and survived.

To Rob Lampkin, isn`t it true, though, that you actually executed a search at his home after he (sic) was kidnapped?

LAMPKIN: Yes, that is correct. And the reason we did that, after consulting with the agencies that went before us, they were looking specifically for items related to their own cases. And, also, we learned that a subterranean search wasn`t done, and we wanted to make sure we used ground-penetrating radar and cadaver dogs to make sure there was nothing beneath the surface that might have been missed.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DISPATCHER: What`s the friend`s name?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Michaela.

DISPATCHER: Michaela?

Michaela.

What`s her last name?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Garecht.

DISPATCHER: Garecht?

MONTANA: You people out there are the most important. The FBI, the local police can only do so much. They need other people`s eyes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nine-year-old Michaela Joy Garecht and her friend hopped on their scooters Saturday morning to buy soda, beef turkey and taffy at the local convenience store.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Michaela left her scooter at that door. And when she came outside, the scooter was gone.

MURCH: Michaela spotted it in the parking lot next to a car and went to get it. And when she then told her pick up the scooter, a man jumped out of the car, grabbed her from behind, threw her into the car, and took off with her.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: Michaela Garecht, 9 years old.

It`s a very famous kidnapping case. You`ve probably heard, it is unsolved. She is missing.

We`re taking your calls live.

I want to go out to Julie in Missouri.

Hi, Julie.

JULIE, MISSOURI: Hi. How are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

JULIE: Yes, I was wondering, have they ever shown the picture of Mr. Garrido to the little girl that witnessed the kidnapping?

CASAREZ: Well, I`m so glad you asked, because, Julie, we put together some pictures. I want you to just look at this.

First of all, we have got a picture of Phillip Garrido back in the day when he was young. And we`re going to put that side by side in just a second with a picture of what the playmate said was the man that abducted Michaela Garecht.

You look for yourself. You look at those.

On the left side is Phillip Garrido when he was young, back in the `80s. On the right, it is a sketch of what Michaela`s playmate said the abductor looked like.

To Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler."

I say there`s a striking resemblance. What say you?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, it`s pretty good, but, you know, the problem we always run into is, you know, witness descriptions, even though this little girl seems to have done a pretty good job of it. You know, we`re never quite sure how accurate they are.

And then there`s the other problem. You know, an awful lot of people around the same age in the same location look alike, which is the same reason we have this problem.

You know how when we had -- you sometimes hear, oh, this little blonde girl went missing here, and she looked just like the other blonde girl that went missing, so it`s got to be the same guy. If you go into a certain area where a certain group of people are, a certain race or a certain cultural background, a lot of them just look the same.

I put up yearbook pages, just open it up, and everybody looks exactly alike from the area you`re living in. So it`s a little confusing. You can`t be absolutely sure for that reason.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MURCH: If Michaela is out there and can hear me, I want her to know that I would like her to come home, that nothing that`s transpired over the last 20 years could change.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

SHARON MURCH, MOTHER OF MISSING GIRL, MICHAELA GARECHT: A week before Michaela was kidnapped, she woke up at 5:00 in the morning and sat down at the coffee table and wrote a poem. She told me that she had written it about people who had been kidnapped and were being held captive. It has always seemed to me like it must be some sort of a prophecy or premonition.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It was supposed to be a quick trip. Friends taking their scooters to the local market to buy candy and soda, but 9- year-old Michaela Joy Garecht never came back.

MURCH: If Michaela hasn`t seen the effort to get her back, she will see and she`ll know how much we love her and care about her and how much everybody else out there cares about her, too.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Michaela Joy Garecht and her friend hopped on their scooters Saturday morning to go buy soda, beef jerky and taffy at the local convenience store. After buying the snacks, the girls realized one scooter is missing.

MURCH: When Michaela spotted it in the parking lot next to a car and went to get it, and when she bent over to pick up the scooter, a man jumped out of the car, grabbed her from behind, threw her into the car and took off with her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police track down lead after lead without success, but investigators don`t stop trying to find Michaela.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s a tremendous effort, and 16 years that I`ve been with the police department, I`ve never seen the community come together like this.

(SINGING) you better watch out, you better not cry

MURCH: We`ve had some really strong leads over the years. And we have a number of things in the investigation that I still have questions about, but I do think that, perhaps, my daughter might still be alive and might come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you see a girl, you know, at a gas station, in a car or something that looks like Michaela or even vaguely resembles her, I just walk up to the car and say, are you Michaela?

MURCH: I keep hearing the words that she said. It`s about people who were kidnapped and are being held captive, not people who were kidnapped and were killed. An amazing poem for a 9-year-old.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wonderings, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boy, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone, but where?

Tonight, it was a Saturday morning. San Francisco, California, suburbs, nine-year-old Michaela Garecht and her little friends drive their scooters to buy snacks, soft drinks, candy. But when they come out of the convenience store, the scooter`s gone. The girls split up to go searching. Suddenly, the little friend hears screaming and actually sees Michaela being forced into a car, the driver a male, speeds away. Tonight, who took nine-year-old Michaela? Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": You know, it`s very interesting, because the abductor was very methodical in all of this, Nancy, because one scooter was still there for the one little playmate, but Michaela`s scooter had been moved between cars. She spotted it. So, she walked over to her scooter and that`s when she was absolutely thrust into a vehicle. The only witness being her little playmate.

I want to go out to Henry Lee, reporter for the "San Francisco Chronicle" joining us tonight from San Francisco, author of "Presumed Dead." Once it was found that this little Michaela Garecht had been kidnapped, the 911 call was made, police responded immediately, right?

HENRY LEE, REPORTER, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE: That`s right. The officers got there very quickly, in fact, got there before a lot of the parents of the children arrived. So, they did everything right as far as the initial response, but obviously, this kidnapper, whoever he was, must have, you know, preplanned some kind of escape route, knew that busy mission boulevard would be full of cars. It was a very, again, very busy arterial road that goes east and west throughout the southern part of Alameda County. Not a trace of Michaela since.

CASAREZ: So, you sort of just evaporate with all the traffic on that Saturday before Thanksgiving. I want to go out to a very special guest tonight. We appreciate her joining us. Sharon Murch, the mother of Michaela, joining us from San Francisco. Sharon, I want to ask you, when you heard several years ago that a man by the name of Phillip Garrido was arrested, that an alleged kidnapped victim of Jaycee Dugard was alive, and then when you found out that this man was about 16 miles away living, when Michaela was abducted, what went through your mind?

MURCH: Well, there had always been, in my mind, a possible connection between Michaela`s kidnapping and Jaycee Dugard`s kidnapping. The descriptions of the cars that were used in the kidnapping was similar. The method of kidnapping was similar.

CASAREZ: You know, Sharon, I have to stop you. Look how similar the two girls look. Jaycee Dugard and Michaela.

MURCH: Yes. They did have a very similar appearance. And there had been people who had been suspects in both cases before, and honestly, my husband woke me up at 5:00 in the morning and told me that he had heard on the news that Jaycee Dugard had been found alive, and I leaped right up. And honestly, I believed that this meant that Michaela would be found alive. Particularly, because Jaycee was found so close to where we are. She was kidnapped in Lake Tahoe which is a few hours from us, but she was found right here in the San Francisco Bay area.

CASAREZ: To Rob Lampkin, the lead investigator from the Hayward Police Department on this case. Since there is an ongoing case of kidnapping against Phillip Garrido, have you not been able to go in and question him, to pointblank ask him questions about this case?

VOICE OF ROB LAMPKIN, INSPECTOR, HAYWARD PD: Jean, that`s been a big problem. And I just heard that up there (ph) had banned any other law enforcement agencies from speaking to the Garridos. And you know, quite honestly, I don`t think that their attorneys would allow it, at this point, anyway.

CASAREZ: Right. I want to go to Peter Odom, defense attorney, joining us out of Atlanta right now. Let`s look at this, legally speaking, Phillip Garrido facing life in prison, kidnapping charge, Jaycee Dugard. I don`t see a plea deal coming in this case. I mean, this is a man that allegedly kidnapped Jaycee Dugard, had two children by her, kept her hostage basically for 18 years, allegedly. So, what`s the motive for him to talk about abducting Michaela?

PETER ODOM, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, think it through. The prosecutors would have to offer Garrido some prospect of life after a long prison term. Some ability to get out and have some 10, 15 years or something in exchange for his admitting to what, you know, might be even a murder. No prosecutor, no police officer is going to make that kind of a deal with a devil like Garrido. I simply don`t see it happening. They`re not going to want to give him anything that would be worth it for him to admit to that. It`s just a difficult position.

CASAREZ: You`re right. Investigators are going to have to figure out another way if they believe he`s the man. Let`s go out to the callers. We`re taking your calls live. Karen in Utah. Hi, Karen.

KAREN, UTAH: Hi. You know, I don`t have really a special question, but I do have one question. However, I just want to say that I grew up in Northern California, and I have to say at that time, this mother did everything that was normal. There wasn`t any reason to suspect that her daughter, not like now, that went off on her scooter would not come home. And I hope that this mother understands that people are not judging her for that.

And I say that from the bottom of my heart. And just to go on to my question because I know there`s a lot of people that would like to have some say in this. Possibly, did the mother know or anybody that she remembers at the time might have heard something about anything that was odd at the time? Because things just didn`t happen back then when, you know, that you didn`t -- you didn`t hear about.

It just -- there just wasn`t like today when it happens every day, every, almost every hour that there`s something happening similar to this. I just wonder if she or anybody that she knows that she can talk to later heard anything that was unusual.

CASAREZ: You`re right. You`re right. Sharon Murch, very quickly, is there anything that just stood out to you? Something that was abnormal in the area at the time?

MURCH: After Michaela was kidnapped, I heard a number of things that were abnormal in the area. I don`t know if I can really talk about them because they`re things that are involved in the investigation, but there were a lot of things that I heard that were strange that were going on in the area.

CASAREZ: All right. Tonight, please help us find Zachary Pittman. He`s 25 years old, and he vanished on June 24th, 2009, from Pearl River, Louisiana. He is 5`9", 160 pounds with brown hair and hazel eyes. If you have any information, please call 985-726-7836.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: It was a Saturday morning, San Francisco, California suburbs, nine-year-old Michaela Garecht and her little friends drive their scooters to buy snacks, soft drinks, candy, but when they come out of the convenience store, the scooter`s gone. The girls split up to go searching. Suddenly, the little friend hears screaming and actually sees Michaela being forced into a car. The driver, a male, speeds away. Tonight, who took nine-year-old Michaela?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Michaela Garecht was nabbed by a man outside a local market and stuffed into his car. No one has seen her, the car, or the suspect since.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was a white guy, kind of dirty blond hair. He had a mustache, white. All I could see was him sitting down in the car. I seen him drive by the first time.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: If it was their daughter, granddaughter, niece or nephew, what would you do and what would you ask of the people around? You`d ask for help.

MURCH: We`ve got fliers up on our windows. And, you know, the purpose of that is so if Michaela hasn`t seen, the effort to get her back, she will see, and she`ll know how much we love her and care about her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Look at this picture. She is Michaela Garecht, nine years old, nicknamed Kayla. Look at this picture. The man who took her looks like this. About 20 years old, tall, slim, long dirty blond hair, heavy acne.

MURCH: We`re sure that he doesn`t want to be caught, and all we`re asking is that he drop her off on a corner somewhere where there`s a phone nearby and tell her to wait five minutes so he can get out of there before she calls home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. We have with us tonight the lead investigator on the Michaela Garecht case, Rob Lampkin, from the Hayward Police Department joining us from San Francisco. Inspector, is it true that you found a palm print on the scooter?

LAMPKIN: Yes, there was a palm print recovered from the scooter.

CASAREZ: Have you been able to compare that palm print with palm prints of your top persons of interest?

LAMPKIN: We have, but you have to remember with the palm print, we`re not sure it is the suspect`s palm print.

CASAREZ: OK. We want to show everybody, Phillip Garrido, who is facing trial now in the Jaycee Dugard kidnapping case. We want to show you the car that was found on his property after he was arrested in 2009. The vehicle that was on his property, look at this, a gold large boxy Sedan, old, tannish gold color, full size Sedan, boxy shape and body damage.

Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation. Listen to this. The vehicle that was described by Michaela`s little friend, that she was abducted in, older, tannish gold, full size Sedan, boxy in shape with body damage. Your thoughts?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, you know, to put a little context into this, between 1988 -- oh, my goodness. I can`t talk. Between 1988 and 1991, there were seven high profile kidnappings in the San Francisco Bay area, leading up to my daughter, Polly`s. Hers was the first one that was ever solved. There have been numerous potential suspects in all of these cases. Of these cases, two of the perps are in prison.

The guy that murdered my daughter and the guy that murdered little Ziana Fairchild and was also responsible for a couple of other crimes. So, the San Francisco Bay area tended to be a real hotbed of perversion during those years. And we were in the middle of this epidemic and people just didn`t know what to do with their children. And you could turn on the TV every year, every couple of months and see another teary eyed parent pleading for the perpetrator to return their child, and it`s something that never happened.

CASAREZ: Marc Klaas, what can you say to Sharon Murch tonight?

KLAAS: Well, Sharon and I have known each other for a long time. She`s a wonderful, strong woman who did absolutely nothing wrong. Her daughter was with her friend as she should have been, and all I can tell to Sharon is to keep hope alive. She knows that Jaycee Dugard came home after numerous years and certainly the same thing can happen to her child.

CASAREZ: Sharon, what is life like on a daily basis? Because I know it can never be the same.

MURCH: Well, it`s always there, sometimes, in the background, and sometimes, in the forefront. I spend a lot of my time talking about Michaela, looking for Michaela. I have my own Facebook, and Michaela`s facebook website blog. And I`m always reaching out to her. And I have a hope with this show because it has been well known that Nancy Grace is doing these programs. And this isn`t the first one. It`s been on for a couple of weeks.

And if Michaela is out there, maybe she has had a chance to hear these programs are on, maybe she`s watching them every day to see if she`s going to be on, to see if we remember her, to see if we are still looking for her. And if she is out there, I just want her to know that we love her, just as much as we did on the day that she was born, just as much as we did on the day that she disappeared. And there is nothing that can change that. And we just want her to come home. I want her to come home.

CASAREZ: What do you think about Phillip Garrido? Do you think there is a connection?

MURCH: I think that there is a possible connection. And I have to tell you, the person that I want to reach out to is Nancy Garrido. I was out at the Garrido house. I saw evidence that Nancy Garrido was there in 1988. If Phillip Garrido kidnapped Michaela, I think there`s a good chance that Nancy knows about it. And there may be possibility of striking up some kind of deal with her if she`s willing to give the information. She`s the one that I want to reach out to. And particularly, I would like for them to not allow the Garridos to talk anymore. I think she needs to get out from under Phillip Garrido`s spell.

CASAREZ: Some good words. To Diane in Indiana. Hi, Diane.

DIANE, INDIANA: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling. Diane? Do you have a question?

DIANE: Yes. My question is, isn`t there any way that they can run a BMV, Bureau Motor Vehicle check on anything him or her, the Garridos, might have had vehicle-wise at that time?

CASAREZ: Interesting question. Good question. To Rob Lampkin, lead investigator, have you been able to get into the Garrido case at all? Are you -- are the records there of what vehicle he may have owned at the time that Michaela was abducted?

LAMPKIN: Yes. I know. I`ve done a full check and pulled up everything they could that was available. And I haven`t really accessed that at all yet. Like I said, we`re still in a holding pattern when it comes to Garrido.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Serina Clark vanished in 2007 from Miami, Florida and may be with her mother. Serina would now be 5 years old.

Amy Pagnac was 13 when she was last seen in her father`s car at a gas station in Minnesota. When her dad returned to the car just after a moment, Amy had vanished. Years later, the family remains hopeful for a break in the case.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The car was still there. Her book that she was reading was still there. She was not. Amy loved to read, and we used to give a lot of books so she could have a lot to read. Amy disappearing was very uncharacteristic. We were supposed to be going shopping in about an hour to buy her new school clothes. She was going to be going into eighth. When he realized, she`s nowhere around, she`s not in the bathroom, she`s not looking in the store to buy something, he was a little -- he was very panicked.

Amy was usually very happy, outgoing. She loved music, and she could sing very well. She liked gymnastics, she liked animals, and she was very interested in volcanoes because, back then, St. Helens had gone off. We`re never going to give up. We`re looking forward to the time when she comes walking through that door. All of us.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: David Abramovitz went missing from Morristown, New Jersey in 2003. He is about 6 feet tall and has a gap between his two front teeth.

Daniel Cantrell of Park Forest, Illinois is now 18. He went missing four years ago and could still be in the local area. His left ear is pierced. His nicknames are D and Danny.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END

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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:37 pm

February 3, 2011
Kyron Horman: Nancy Grace America’s Missing
Posted: 09:41 PM ET


His disappearance sparked the largest search in Oregon’s history. 7-year-old Kyron Horman vanished from his elementary school, his stepmother the last to see him walking down the hallway toward his classroom.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Kyron-10

Kyron never made it to his classroom and he was never seen again. A photo taken of boy at a science fair at school earlier on the day he went missing, June 4, 2010 would become the image seen around the country to help locate him. No suspects or persons of interest have been made public by law enforcement despite a dark cloud of suspicion hovering over the stepmother, Terri Horman.

Tipline: 503-261-2847
Reward: $50,000
Missing Since: 06/04/10
Missing From: Portland, OR
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 7
Height: 3’8”
Weight: 50 lbs
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Brown
Identifying Marks: Wears eyeglasses
Clothing:
-Black t-shirt with "CSI" on it
-Black cargo pants
-White socks
-Black sketcher sneakers w/orange trim






Disappearance of Second-Grader Kyron Horman

Aired February 4, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He has a great sense of humor and he loves to laugh. And he`s just a great kid.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): His disappearance sparked the largest missing persons search in Oregon`s history. More than 155 acres have been scoured to find Kyron Horman, the bespeckled boy last seen on June 4, 2010.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: "Not till the loom is silent and the shuttles cease to fly will God unroll the canvass and explain the reason why."

KAINE HORMAN, KYRON`S FATHER: I saw him the day of the science fair that morning, and gave each other a couple big hugs, and just told him to have a great day at the fair and enjoy presenting his project to everybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One of the last known images of Kyron taken the day of his disappearance shows him smiling standing next to his science fair project on tree frogs. That photo was taken by his stepmother. She told the police she last saw the boy walking toward his classroom at Skyline Elementary School. But the second-grader never made it there.

HORMAN: The bus driver looked at us and told us that he wasn`t on the bus today. So we figured, well, he must still be waiting for us at the school, so she called the school on her cell phone, and that`s when we found out he hadn`t been there all day.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And what went through your mind?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Panic.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Within eight months, there has been little to no physical evidence to clue authorities in on what happened to Kyron. The stepmother, Terri Horman, has been the focus of the investigation, though never knew the suspect or a person of interest.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: They`re saying that you failed two polygraph tests. Did you fail to polygraph tests?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What makes you believe that she`s lying?

DESIREE YOUNG, KYRON`S MOTHER: Well, because we were there, too. We know the truth. And what she talks about is not the same.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Since he vanished, his father and stepmother have been in a bitter divorce battle stemming from allegations she tried to hire a hit man to have her husband killed. At the core of the family drama playing out in court filings is the missing Kyron Horman.

HORMAN: Kyron, we miss you. Your school friends and their families, the teachers, the staff at your school, and the community as a whole have shown how much impact one little boy`s smile can have on a community.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. Fifty nights we go live spotlighting America`s missing children. , boys and girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone, but where?

Tonight, live, rural Oregon. Stepmommy walks her 7-year-old down the hall of his elementary school. He`s never seen again.

Police insist stepmommy take a second polygraph. In a stunning twist, 7-year-old Kyron`s dad files for divorce in secret and slaps stepmommy with an emergency order to stay away from her own children. Bio mom pleads to stepmommy to please help police.

And another bizarre twist. We learn stepmommy tries to hire a hit man to murder the 7-year-old, Kyron`s, father, her husband, and carries on a torrid sex affair after Kyron goes missing, even sending X-rated photos to her lover. Despite all this, still no sign of 7-year-old Kyron Horman.

Tonight, we have not forgotten.

Now, straight out to Jean Casarez.

Jean, what`s the latest?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Nancy, this is a very active case. We have to find Kyron Horman. Who can forget this little boy with the thick glasses that we have gotten to know so well through the months?

There was just a search that took place, a very targeted search.

I want to go out to Natisha Lance.

We are taking your calls live tonight.

Natisha, where was this search and where was this targeted area?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, this search happened in the rural parts of Portland, in the west and also in the north. There were 50 searchers who were out at this area, Jean.

There were 11 target areas, about three to six acres each. They were able to clear seven of those areas with cadaver dogs. There were also some areas that they wanted to go through on foot. There were four of those areas, and they were able to get through one of them.

Now, investigators have said that they plan to go back to this area; however, they don`t know when that time will be. And this is an area, the one which they searched, that they had planned to go to previously, but were prohibited from going there because of weather constraints. It`s about 1,500 feet up elevation, so it`s a difficult area to get to, but this is the area that police are now focusing on.

CASAREZ: Natisha, do we know at all why they`re going to this particular area?

LANCE: Police are not giving any indication as to why, but what they will say is that all their searches at this point are targeted searches. They`re not throwing darts in the dark here. They are doing things very calculated and for a reason. So we have to assume police have some type of information that led them to this area.

CASAREZ: And they are not giving up.

Let`s go to Ellie Jostad, NANCY GRACE producer.

I want to start from the beginning, because I want people to really see where this all started. Let`s look at the timeline. It all started in the morning hours of June 4th, right, 2010?

ELLIE JOSTAD, PRODUCER, NANCY GRACE: Right. That`s right.

And little Kyron had a science fair that morning. As you heard in the open there, he was doing a project. He went there with his stepmother. She took him to the school.

After the science fair, she apparently was going to go look at some more of the exhibit. She said she last saw him walking toward his second grade classroom.

So that`s the last time anybody sees Kyron alive. But there`s a huge gap in this timeline. And the problem is that nobody noticed Kyron was missing until he didn`t get off the school bus that day. So we have got a huge window there where nobody knows where Kyron was.

CASAREZ: All right. Now, we do know a bit of a timeline, because Terri Horman, the stepmother in all of this, said that she went to some Fred Meyer supermarkets, right, Ellie?

JOSTAD: Right. She claims that between 9:30 and about 10:30, she went to -- a witness actually saw her during that time. She said she first went to a Fred Meyer store to try to get some medication for her daughter, Kiara. She said they didn`t have what she was looking for, so she went to a second Fred Meyer store.

Then she said she also went to the gym at 11:20. At about -- sorry, about 12:20 she left the gym, gets home at about 12:45. She said that at 2:00, Kyron`s dad got home. At 3:30, they went to go meet the bus, realized Kyron`s not on it. That`s when they contacted the school and realized he hadn`t been in class that day.

CASAREZ: All right. To C.W. Jensen, retired Portland police captain, joining us from Portland, Oregon.

You`ve been on this case from the beginning factually. You know so much about it.

Here`s a question that I`ve had for a long time. Do you know at all if little Kyron`s coat and his backpack were left at the school? Or did they leave when he left?

C.W. JENSEN, RETIRED PORTLAND POLICE CAPTAIN: I don`t believe that any of Kyron`s possessions were left there. I think that the theory that everyone is going on is that Terri Horman`s story is false, that she didn`t see him walking to his classroom, that she then took him out of the school and, ultimately, you know, was responsible for his disappearance.

CASAREZ: Do you find it amazing, though, that he was at his science fair that morning, it was red tree frogs was his experiment. If he did get his coat and his backpack -- because I checked the temperatures then. It was in the 50s in that area during that time. That`s cold. So you are going to have a coat and you`re going to put your jacket on. That nobody saw him put his coat on or get his backpack to leave?

JENSEN: You know what`s kind of interesting that I found when I take my daughter to elementary school? People get into a routine.

You know, you may not notice if your neighbor`s car is in the driveway because you see it all the time. And sometimes when we`re just used to seeing people, and seeing people do things in certain areas, it doesn`t make an impact on us. So people may have seen Kyron walking somewhere and it just didn`t register.

CASAREZ: You`re right. You`re so right.

We`re taking your calls.

Carol, in Florida.

Hi, Carol.

CAROL, FLORIDA: Hi. I`m so glad you`re taking my call. I just -- I have one question and one observation.

We have a family member who`s been missing for 18 years. And my question here is, the stepmother, does she have any previous animosity against the young child? Or, you know, has she shown any kind of abuse or anything like that? That`s my -- you know, I wouldn`t think so if she took a picture, unless that was just some kind of a setup.

And my second is, I don`t understand the school. I mean, the child is missing. He doesn`t go to class, they don`t have a phone call that he`s sick, and he`s not on the bus.

CASAREZ: Carol, first of all, I want to tell you how sorry we are for your relative that`s been missing for 18 years, because since I`ve been doing this series, my heart goes out to you, because I can`t imagine what you have gone through and continue to go through.

As far as the school, the school says that Terri Horman said that she was taking Kyron to the doctor`s and he wasn`t going to be in school that day. Now, she refutes that.

But I want to go to Natisha Lance, NANCY GRACE producer.

There have been so many legal documents through the temporary restraining order, through the divorce, through the contempt of court motion. And we`ve heard a little bit in those documents about Terri Horman`s feelings about Kyron.

LANCE: We have. We`ve heard a lot, actually. And some things have been a bit disturbing.

Kaine Horman, in the most recent filing that he had, said that Terri Horman was an unfit mother, that she had on undiagnosed personality disorder. He also said that she would use extreme measures to punish Kyron.

Now, these were things that were a surprise to Kyron Horman`s mother, Desiree Young. She actually gave an interview where she said that she didn`t know anything about this.

Also, Kaine Horman also revealed that Terri Horman apparently had a drinking problem, according to him. There would be days where she would come home several nights a week, and she would pass out on the couch and wake up several times throughout the night.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

YOUNG: Nighttime is extremely difficult for me. I don`t sleep well. But it`s just -- I know it sounds funny, but I can`t hear him breathe at night, and the lack of the noise is what makes it hard.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

YOUNG: I was at work. Then I got a phone call on my cell phone from Susan Hall (ph), who`s the secretary at Skyline. And she said, "You`re listed as the emergency notification for Kyron Horman." And I said, "Yes, he`s my son." And she said, "Well, I need to notify you, he`s missing."

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Kyron Horman`s stepmom, Terri Horman, says she last saw Kyron around 8:45 a.m. after taking him to school to show his science fair project on red tree frogs. As the fair concluded, Terri Horman claims she watched Kyron walk toward his second-grade classroom just 150 feet away, but Kyron never makes it.

HORMAN: She was one of the last people that saw him that day. And, again, it just helped associate things that were seen along with him.

YOUNG: I know she`s involved.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Do you think she would have done this alone?

YOUNG: I don`t believe so. I think that she probably needed help.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This will not become a cold case for us. We will continue to investigate this case until we have it solved.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez of "In Session."

Kyron Horman, the little boy with the thick glasses, so innocent, he just wanted to do his science experiment on June 4th of 2010.

Marc Klaas, founder, president of Klaas Kids Foundation, joining us tonight from San Francisco.

Marc, at this point, are they trying to find who did it, the perpetrator? Or are they trying to find Kyron to corroborate all the other evidence they have?

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: The goal always is to find the missing person. Once you find the missing person, hopefully the other pieces will fall into place. But until you find that, you never really know.

So, everybody -- and unfortunately, they`re not all working together now. Even family members seem to be working at odds with each other. There`s a lot of harsh words. But everybody is working for the same goal, and that goal is to find Kyron and bring him home.

CASAREZ: Why do you think Terri Horman has never actively searched for him?

KLAAS: Because I think Terri Horman is probably responsible for his disappearance. That`s where absolutely everything seems to point.

There were some e-mails unearthed that Desiree said exhibited a severe hatred for Kyron. Kaine has come out and said some terrible things about her. She has unaccounted for time. She seems to have failed some polygraph exams.

Her cell phone was pinging off of Sauvie Island, which it turns out is larger than Manhattan Island, which makes it a very problematic area to search. So one thing after another after another points to her, not to mention the fact that her story -- pardon me -- her story about those last moments when she saw him make absolutely no sense at all.

CASAREZ: Let`s talk about Sauvie Island, because this could be an important piece of that puzzle.

To Natisha Lance, NANCY GRACE producer.

First of all, talk to us about the pings that were found on Sauvie Island. And how far away is this from Kyron`s school?

LANCE: It`s only about six miles away from Kyron`s school. And what reports have said early on is that Terri Horman`s cell phone pinged to a different area than which she claimed to be, and those pings coming from Sauvie Island.

Now, we went through the timeline, Ellie went through the timeline where Terri Horman says that she was all these different places. But there is a gap in that timeline, and that is between 10:15 and 11:30. And that is a gap where police are still trying to determine exactly where Terri Horman was. And we don`t know at this point because police have not revealed it, but perhaps that is where her cell phone pinged.

CASAREZ: And there have been multiple searches on Sauvie Island.

To Candy in Alabama.

Hi, Candy.

CANDY, ALABAMA: Hi. My question is on the polygraph. I understand she failed the first one. Did she fail the second one, too?

CASAREZ: All right. Good question. I do know she took one and failed it.

Ellie Jostad, NANCY GRACE producer, did she take more than one polygraph?

JOSTAD: Well, Kaine Horman, Kyron`s father, has claimed that she`s taken two polygraphs tests, actually, and walked out of a third one. Now, police won`t comment on any polygraph tests that have been given, but that is what the father is saying.

CASAREZ: All right.

To Pat Brown, criminal profiler.

You know, one thing that investigators have really focused on is this white pickup truck that they say Terri Horman was driving that morning. In fact, they passed out flyers to ask people if they saw it in the front of the school, if they saw it to the side of the school, down the road, and if this white pickup had a second person in it that morning.

Is that a key, Pat Brown?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, obviously they`re trying, in my opinion, sadly, trying to find the body of Kyron. And they believe Terri Horman -- you know, as Marc Klaas has said, everything points to Terri Horman and you can`t think of anybody else who could be involved in this.

So they`re looking at Terri Horman and what she was driving. They believe that Kyron was in that vehicle, and that she took that vehicle some place and got rid of the poor boy.

I know that`s what they believe, but they`ve got to prove it, and that`s their problem. They just don`t have the physical evidence.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HORMAN: We don`t know where, that`s why we`re continuing to ask everyone to keep their eyes peeled, to look when they`re out and about. Just because there are some areas of focus that the media is covering, it doesn`t mean that we know where he is. We don`t.

We don`t know where he is. We need to keep looking.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

YOUNG: The biggest thing that we want is, like I said, for everyone to know who Kyron is.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The 7-year-old was last seen on June 4, 2010. He was walking toward his classroom after a science fair at school.

YOUNG: It`s like a portal opened up in the school and Kyron just vanished into it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Since he vanished, his father and stepmother have been in a bitter divorce battle, stemming from allegations she tried to hire a hit man to have her husband killed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Would you have to find Kyron before you would make an arrest?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No.

YOUNG: I fully believe she`s involved.

HORMAN: But to what capacity is what the investigation is trying to figure out.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: We have to find Kyron Horman. It is eight months to the day that he went missing.

I want to go out to the lawyers, Joey Jackson, defense attorney, coming to us from New York, and John Manuelian, defense attorney out of Los Angeles.

To Joey Jackson, there is a divorce proceeding that is going on right now. It has been stayed, but it is going on between Kaine Horman and Terri Horman.

It`s a long story, but to put it down really quickly, after this all came down and Kyron went missing, Kaine found out through investigators that Terri allegedly had tried to hire a hit man, the landscaper, to kill him the previous December. Following that, she started allegedly having an affair with Michael Cook (ph), who he went to school with, who was the leader of Kyron`s vigil. There was sexting and texting on the phone, and that`s when he filed for divorce.

Here`s my question. There`s an abatement of the proceedings now. Both sides have stipulated that they agreed to that.

If you`re representing Kaine Horman, don`t you want to go forward with that to see what can come out, to see what can maybe help find your son?

JOEY JACKSON, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Potentially. First of all, Jean, very well summed up. It`s a mouthful because there`s a lot going on here.

But, you know, there`s a lot to be said for staying the proceeding, because issues affecting divorce, as we know, there`s custody affected, there`s the future of the party that`s affected, and where there`s a missing child it certainly makes sense. On the other hand, you never know what jewels can be uncovered, but that`s for a grand jury to determine, as they have been through an extensive investigation.

So we`ll see what comes out of it, but certainly from, you know, a civil perspective, with the family and the divorce and all the rest of it, it`s going to be an ongoing never-ending story, as we can see.

CASAREZ: And John Manuelian, very quickly, doesn`t the Fifth Amendment come into play here? Because any question she`d be asked she wouldn`t answer.

JOHN MANUELIAN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: As her lawyer, I would tell her to take that into account. Absolutely.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

YOUNG: Kyron, we love you and we miss you. We remain here working hard every day to get you home. Please do not be afraid because the police are going to find you.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

DESIREE YOUNG, KYRON HORMAN`S MOTHER: He has a great sense of humor, and he loves to laugh. And he`s just a great kid.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: His disappearance sparked the largest missing persons search in Oregon`s history. More than 155 acres have been scoured to find Kyron Horman. The bespeckled boy last seen on June 4th, 2010.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s not till the loom is silent and the shuttles cease to fly will God unroll the canvass and explain the reason why.

KAINE HORMAN, KYRON HORMAN`S FATHER: I saw him the day of the science fair that morning and gave each other a couple big hugs and just told them to have a great day at the fair and enjoy presenting his project to everybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: One of the last known images of Kyron taken the day of his disappearance shows him smiling standing next to his science fair project on tree frogs. That photo was taken by his stepmother. She told police she last saw the boy walking toward his classroom at Skyline Elementary School, but the 2nd grader never made it there.

HORMAN: The bus driver looked at us and told us that he wasn`t on the bus today. So, we figured, well, he must still be waiting for us at school. So, she called the school on her cell phone, and that`s what we found out he hadn`t been there all day.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What went through your mind?

HORMAN: Panic.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Within eight months, there has been little to no physical evidence to clue authorities in on what happened to Kyron. The stepmother, Terri Horman, has been the focus of the investigation but never named a suspect or a person of interest.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You`re saying that you failed two polygraph tests. Did you fail two polygraph tests?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What makes you believe that she`s lying?

YOUNG: Well, because we were there, too. We know the truth. And what she talks about is not the same.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Since he vanished, his father and stepmother have been in a bitter divorce battle stemming from allegations she tried to hire a hit man to have her husband killed. At the core of the family drama playing out in court filings is the missing, Kyron Horman.

HORMAN: Kyron, we miss you. Your school friends and their families, the teachers, the staff at your school and the community as a whole have shown how much impact one little boy`s smile can have on a community.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys and girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone, but where?

Tonight, live, Rural Oregon, step mommy walks her 7-year-old down the hall of his elementary school. He`s never seen again. Police insist step- mommy take a second polygraph. In a stunning twist, seven-year-old Kyron`s dad files for divorce in secret and slaps step-mommy with an emergency order to stay away from her own children. Bio-mom pleads to step-mommy to please help police.

In another bizarre twist, we learned step-mommy tries to hire a hit man to murder the seven-year-old, Kyron`s father, her husband, and carries on a torrid sex affair after Kyron goes missing. Even sending X-rated photos to her lover. Despite all this, still, no sign of seven-year-old Kyron Horman. Tonight, we have not forgotten. And now, straight out to Jean Casarez. Jean, what`s the latest?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, it is eight months to the day that Kyron went missing. And this is an extremely active investigation. They have just launched a very targeted search in Rural Oregon, but I want to go out to Natisha Lance because the task force that was formed shortly after Kyron went missing has not stopped a day in the search for Kyron, and they are due to make a public report at any time, right?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right. This task force was formed back in October. It`s a nine-member multi-agency task force. And Jean, I just have to remind people it was 42 different agencies that were involved in this search for Kyron in the very beginning, but February 1st was their 120-day deadline. They were supposed to go before commissioners, and they were hoping to have some type of big development in the case by that point.

So far, nothing has been made public to us, but the chief still has yet to go before this commission group.

CASAREZ: And they have publicly said that this is the largest search for a missing person in Oregon that has ever been launched. I want to go out to John Manuelian, defense attorney, joining us from Los Angeles. You know, focus of the investigation has been this white pickup truck because authorities believed early on that it could be key because this is what Terri Horman was driving, and they asked anyone who`s at the school that day who had been to a Fred Myers Supermarket, if they had seen that car in front of the school, by the school, down the road, in the parking lot, and if a second person had been in that car.

Here`s my question to you. If there were two people involved in this little boy`s abduction, then why hasn`t one of them been charged with something like obstruction of justice? We know DeDe Spicher, a good friend of Terri Horman`s, went before the grand jury, whether she testified or not. We don`t know. She walked into the courthouse. And in some respect, can`t they loop it around to get the facts that way?

JOHN MANUELIAN, CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Yes, they could, but here`s I think the focal point or the interest. You have to understand that this lady had access to her step son, Mr. Kyron Horman. She could have taken him and drove him out anywhere in Oregon and have him buried. There`s a lot of connections that they need to make first. There`s a lot of things that they`re doing right now. And I think it`s premature for us to guess.

However, I would tell you that based on the fact that this lady got a criminal defense attorney, who is well known in Oregon, tends to me as a criminal defense attorney to make me believe that she had either direct or indirect involvement. At the very least, I think that she probably had some animosity or some motive to kill him based on what we`re hearing. The cruel punishments, the abusive behavior, it all points to her in the end.

CASAREZ: We`re taking your calls live. To Donna in Utah. Hi, Donna.

DONNA, UTAH: Hi. I was just wondering if when he actually disappeared or even since he disappeared, if they`ve taken search dogs into the school and searched every nook and cranny and closet and foot locker and everything in the school looking possibly if he`s in there somewhere.

CASAREZ: Very good question. I believe they have. To CW Jensen who is a retired Portland Police captain who is based there in Portland, Oregon, what about those search dogs?

CW JENSEN, RETIRED PORTLAND POLICE CAPTAIN: Well, at the beginning of this investigation, there was all these different ways that things could have gone, and so, we had this huge, huge search because we didn`t know if he was in the school. We didn`t know if he was on the school grounds or the area around. So, all that has been done. The searching, looking for him allegedly or perhaps alive say he wandered away from the school or did something like that.

That was completed months ago. What`s going on now is clearly, because their using cadaver dogs, is that they continue to go either to Sauvie`s Island or in the forested parts around the school looking for his body. And until that happens, and if they found him next week, I think Terri Horman would be arrested next week. If his body is not recovered for some time, then this is going to drag out for some time.

CASAREZ: Very quickly. Do you know if a scent dog initially followed his scent to a vehicle? Or walking off the elementary school campus?

JENSEN: As my understanding that there would be nothing to suggest that he wandered away from that school by himself. Remember, he went to that school every single day for nine months of that year. That`s what he did. That was his job. He liked going to school. He didn`t wander away. He was taken away.

CASAREZ: And that was the big day for him to have his science fair project.

Tonight, please help us find Danny Barter. He was 4 years old when he vanished on June 18th, 1959 from Perdido Bay, Alabama. At the time of his disappearance, he was 3 feet tall, 50 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes. If you have any information, please call 251-972-8589. If your loved one`s missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help to find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Tonight, live, Rural Oregon, step mommy walks her seven-year- old down the hall of his elementary school. He`s never seen again. Police insist step-mommy take a second polygraph. In a stunning twist, seven- year-old Kyron`s dad files for divorce in secret and slaps step-mommy with an emergency order to stay away from her own children. Bio-mom pleads to step-mommy to please help police.

And another bizarre twist, we learn step-mommy tries to hire a hit man to murder the seven-year-old, Kyron`s father, her husband and carries on a torrid sex affair after Kyron goes missing. Even sending X-rated photos to her lover. Despite all this, still, no sign of seven-year-old Kyron Horman.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KAINE HORMAN: Every day that all the strength I have will go to him and shield him from everything that`s going on right now.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It was about 8:00 a.m. in Skyline Elementary School opened early that day, so families can look at the science fair. Around this time, stepmom, Terri Horman, enters the school with Kyron. Seven-year-old Kyron proudly poses in front of his science fair exhibit at about 8:15 a.m., but just minutes later, he would never be seen again.

YOUNG: The worst hell I`ve ever experienced. I can`t even explain it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Why won`t you talk with investigators?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Cell phone pings reportedly place Kyron Horman`s stepmother, Terri Moulton Horman, elsewhere than she claimed to be the day of his disappearance. Terri Horman is not a suspect or a person of interest, but she is who Kyron`s parents believe to be responsible for his disappearance.

YOUNG: We (INAUDIBLE) Terri Horman to fully cooperate with the investigators to bring Kyron home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. It is eight months to the day that little Kyron Horman went to school. He had his red tree frog experiment, and then he was gone. Absolutely gone. I want to go to Kathryn Smerling, psychologist joining us tonight out of New York. What are Kyron`s parents going through every day, but on an anniversary, an eight-month anniversary of his disappearance?

KATHRYN SMERLING, PH.D., PSYCHOLOGIST: They must be so terribly frustrated. And obviously, they are frustrated, and they`re showing anger at each other which is kind of misplaced as Marc Klaas said. They really should be joined together to try and find Kyron. And anyone who plans on killing their husband, I`m speaking about Terri Horman, could certainly make a plan to kill her stepson.

CASAREZ: Well, let me ask you very quickly about Terri Horman, because Terri Horman is not a suspect. She is not a person of interest. She has not been charged with anything. What`s she going through right now? What`s going through her mind, do you think?

SMERLING: Oh, I`m sure she`s trying to find ways to defend herself, and I really shouldn`t conclude that she is guilty before she has a chance to prove that, but everything does point towards her, and if you look at, and you examine who she is, if you see pictures of her five years ago as a body builder and now today, you will see a total transformation from someone who possibly was on steroids, to someone who is drinking, and someone who has a child with a man that she is trying to kill.

What makes her -- what makes her not able to take that step further? She seems to be a very troubled person with narcissistic personality disorder, possibly borderline, and certainly with rage that cannot be tempered.

CASAREZ: To CW Jensen, retired Portland police captain, joining us from Portland, Oregon. Here`s what I want to ask you. Can you describe for us how to get from the school to Sauvie Island? Because I keep going back to Sauvie Island because allegedly pings from Terri Horman`s cell phone were found on that island about midday. Is it, what kind of a road is it, and could there be any surveillance cameras if it`s a type of highway?

JENSEN: Well, Skyline Road where the school is located doesn`t really have any cameras or anything like that like you`d find on a freeway or something like that. And it`s just a very short drive, less than probably a half a mile to get to a major road, Cornelius Pass Road, and that`s the one you take about five miles downhill and, boom, you`re at Sauvie`s Island. So, it`s actually a fairly quick drive.

CASAREZ: So, do you think there could be cameras on that major roadway you`re talking about?

JENSEN: I know the investigators have looked at all of those types of things, whether it`s, you know, ATM machines or stores, anything along those roads. And beyond just those roads down to Sauvie`s Island, they`ve looked, you know, anywhere that they thought a camera could be. That`s something that`s very common these days.

CASAREZ: Exactly. Now, the Columbia River surrounds the island, yes, no?

JENSEN: Yes.

CASAREZ: OK.

JENSEN: Yes. It`s very rural. A lot of farms. Things like that.

CASAREZ: From your investigations that you have done throughout the years in that area, how often are bodies located in this fast moving river? Do they float up to the top, go to the side?

JENSEN: Yes. Generally, what will happen is if someone is killed, and they`re dumped in water, over time, the bacteria in your body creates gases and that`s why we have bodies that, you know, pop up, especially after the wintertime. In the springtime, you know, you`ll get bodies popping up in water because they warm up and those gases raise up. Now, you know, if it`s shallow or things like that, I mean, the water, you know, causes the body to decompose even faster.

CASAREZ: This current search that they just undertook in Rural Portland area, tell us where that is in relation to Sauvie Island. Is it opposite direction?

JENSEN: Well, no, I mean, all this is kind of in the same area. There`s a very large urban park in Portland called Forest Park. So, there`s a lot -- I mean, it`s like a wilderness right in the middle of the city. So, I mean, it`s forest. There`s animals. There`s all sorts of things in there. So, all these things are happening somewhere kind of focused around Skyline School, but it`s just that right around that school, you`ve just got a lot of forest land and a lot of places where you could be dumped.

CASAREZ: And we want to tell everybody, authorities are continuing in time with this targeted search.

Tonight, "CNN Heroes."

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Growing up in Texas, football is very important. It`s like a religion. You get the adrenaline going. You want to win.

EDDIE CANALES, COMMUNITY CRUSADER: It was senior night. Chris was having the game of his life.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It was the fourth quarter. I made a touchdown saving tackle. I heard my teammates saying Chris, come on, let`s go. I can`t move.

CANALES: You don`t want to even think that your son may never walk again. That was a hard pill to swallow.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Around my one-year anniversary, I was going through a lot of depression.

CANALES: I said, let`s go to a football game.

We ended up watching another young man suffer a spinal cord injury.

Chris, he turns to me said, dad, we`ve got to go help him. I`m Eddie Canales. My goal is to be there for young men that have suffered spinal cord injuries playing high school football.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When we hear about an injury, we go to the families as soon as we can.

CANALES: Since we started, we worked with 19 families just in the state of Texas.

We help them with ramps in their homes, a wheelchair accessible vehicles.

We`re ready to roll.

It`s a very expensive injury. Someone injured on the professional level is going to be taken care of, but on a high school level, it`s a totally different story. We wanted to make sure that these kids are not forgotten.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re a band of brothers. Our biggest bond is football.

CANALES: They were on the gridiron, but they never quit. They`ve never given up. That`s what keeps me pushing.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Families left behind, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Kristina Branum was last seen in 2006 in Savannah, Tennessee. She may go by the name Kris and be in the company of an adult male.

Ricky Lane Thomas Jr. was 13 years. He disappeared from Bristow, Indiana. He was reportedly headed to a cousin`s home and seen on the way with his two puppies. A few days later, the dogs return home, but Ricky was never heard from again, according to his half sister.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They searched in the cave, horseback riding, four wheelers. The community had pulled themselves together. A lot of family had pulled themselves together and walked through the woods and searched for any evidence of Ricky, And no evidence was found. his wallet was reported to be on his table in his room, and he always takes his wallet.

My brother was a fun, outgoing, loving person. We played race cars together. He was a prankster. He would go hide things and jump out in the dark with a mask on. He was a good person. He was a kid. He was living life. If my brother`s gone, I want my brother`s body to be laid to rest where it belongs, and I just want justice.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you have any information, call 1-800-the lost.

Brenda Apalicio was 39 when she vanished from Albuquerque, New Mexico. She was last seen in 2003 in her relative`s home. Brenda has a tattoo on her right shoulder saying sad eyes.

Asha Degree disappeared from her own bedroom in the middle of the night. Although, foul play is suspected, her mother remains hopeful.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: When I pushed open that bedroom door, only person in the room was my son. And I asked him where was his sister? He was like, she`s in her bed. No, she`s not in her bed. So, we searched the house. She was not in my house. We honestly believe that she did walk out of our house. Two different motorists saw her in that area, and I believe that after the second car seen her that somebody actually put her in the car.

I don`t know who or where, but that`s been my belief for the last 11 years that somebody picked her up that morning. I have faith in God and I have enough faith to believe that if my child was not still alive, that the Lord would let me know one way or the other that she`s no longer on this earth with us. I`m expecting any day that she could walk in my house.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END



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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:12 am

February 7, 2011

Margaret Haddican-McEnroe: Nancy Grace America’s Missing

Posted: 12:32 PM ET


Would a young woman willingly leave her children, life and family all behind? That is the question that caused two days to go by before Margaret Haddican-McEnroe was reported missing on October, 10, 2006.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Margar10

Friends and Family thought maybe she was just blowing off some stream after an argument with her husband the day before – but surely she’d return. That was almost 5 years ago and there has been little evidence to show what happened to Margaret. It’s true, the disappearance is mysterious – her cell phone and SUV were left behind, but her husband says eleven thousand dollars in cash came up missing from their home when she vanished. Where is Margaret Haddican-McEnroe?

Tipline: 908-753-1000
Reward: $20,000
Missing Since: 10/10/06
Missing From: Warren Township, NJ
Classification: Missing
Age at Disappearance: 29
Height: 5’2”
Weight: 110 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Tattoos:
-Fire Helmet & word “Sarah” inside right calf
-Word “trouble” on large cross on upper back
-Tribal tattoo on lower back;
-Sun tattoo on shoulder blade
-Moon tattoo on shoulder blade
Clothing:
-Grey sweatshirt with “Army” in black letters
-White plaid pajama bottoms
-White Nike sneakers
-White gold 3 stone wedding ring
-Dog tags




Missing New Jersey Mother

Aired February 7, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PATRICK HADDICAN, FATHER OF MISSING MOTHER: It`s hard to believe under any kind of circumstances that Margaret would leave her children. It`s almost incomprehensible. She loved her children too much.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Would a young mother willingly leave her children, life and family all behind? That question caused two days to go by before reporting 29-year-old Margaret Haddican`s disappearance on October 10, 2006.

Friends and family thought maybe she was blowing off steam after an argument with her husband the day before, but surely she`d return. That was almost five years ago.

HADDICAN: I guess it was about six days after Margaret had disappeared that we got a phone call from the Warren police. And they didn`t even ask us -- or tell us she disappeared. It was just during the conversation that we found out.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her husband, Tim McEnroe, says he left her at home around 1:30 p.m. to buy baby formula at Margaret`s request. When he returned, his wife was gone and their infant baby, still in her crib, was home alone.

TIM MCENROE, MARGARET`S HUSBAND: We had run out of baby formula. And I went to the store and got that, and then came back. And I went back out and I did another job, and when I got back she wasn`t here.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Warren Township did some preliminary investigation into her cell phone records to see if they could locate her. She had left her cell phone behind. It was damaged earlier in the week. So she did not take her cell phone with her, did not take a family vehicle with her.

HADDICAN: I have some inconsistencies in my mind about -- from what I understand has happened. I find it and my wife finds it very hard to believe that she would just up and go and leave her three young children.

She was wearing knee braces, one on each of her legs. And for her to leave the house without taking her car and walking has me concerned.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But allegedly missing with her, $11,000 in cash. There is no explanation as to why she`d want to leave, but no signs of foul play either.

HADDICAN: Margaret, please come home. Everybody misses you. We love you very much. The children need you and they miss you very much. Please come home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. Fifty nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. Gone, but where?

Tonight, a beautiful young firefighter, she served our country. Mommy disappears from an upscale New Jersey home, seemingly vanishing into thin air, leaving behind three little girls.

Husband, Tim McEnroe, reportedly leaves the home to buy baby formula, comes back, she`s gone. Mommy vanishes. Her 6-month-old baby girl alone in the crib. Friends and family say she would never do that.

Why did the husband reportedly wait two full days to report mommy missing? The beautiful mom`s car and cell phone, left behind.

Now, four years later, Margaret`s family still holding out hope. We have not forgotten.

Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Nancy, this is a very active investigation. Police are still searching. And it all began on October 10th of 2006. A bizarre set of facts. This is a young mother, had young children at home, and all of a sudden she`s completely gone.

I want to go out to Martin DiCaro, investigative reporter joining us tonight from New York.

Now, this all happened in New Jersey. Tell us where in New Jersey, and start from the beginning.

MARTIN DICARO, INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER: It happened in Warren Township, Somerset County, in October of 2006, about four-and-a-half years ago. And unfortunately for Margaret, there`s about as much evidence now to indicate what happened to her as there were four-and-a-half years ago.

The day before she vanished she was at her parent`s home. And at her parent`s home she got into an argument on the phone with her husband, Timothy McEnroe.

Then she went back to her residence and she got into another argument with her husband there. The police were called after that argument. It`s unclear who called 911, but the police did show up at the house. No charges were filed.

And then the following morning, Margaret got on the phone with her best friend, and there didn`t seem to be anything in the conversation according to her friend that would indicate something was up, something bad was going to happen. And as you saw in the opening to the program, her husband claims that he went out to run an errand, came back a couple hours later, and his wife was gone.

Now, there`s no evidence to indicate foul play, but the circumstantial evidence certainly indicates that it`s unlikely that this woman, who was dedicated to her kids, wearing knee braces, wearing a sweatshirt and plaid white pajama pants the last time she was seen, would just get up and leave, leaving her car behind, leaving her cell phone behind, and taking with her $11,000 in cash, according to her husband.

CASAREZ: Now, Martin, I believe that it`s true -- I want break in -- that her husband said that she had done this type of thing before, that she had left home, but always come back. And that`s why he thought that that was going to happen this time.

Rupa Mikkilineni, NANCY GRACE producer, joining us from New York.

She had a 5-month-old infant that was in a crib. She had a 22-month- old. What did she take with her when she left?

RUPA MIKKILINENI, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, that`s what`s so bizarre, Jean. If she was leaving, why would she take nothing? She didn`t take her purse, she didn`t take her wallet, she didn`t take her cell phone. Of course, that was broken from the argument from the day before. She didn`t take her car.

And apparently, according to her parents -- and we may want to clear this up, because we do have Patrick Haddican, her father, on the show -- I understand that she had scheduled knee surgery the following week, on a Wednesday. She had knee troubles, and she was wearing knee braces in the interim.

Now, apparently, she left without those knee braces as well, and didn`t even pack a bag, al though one -- we have heard that her husband says that it`s possible a black duffel bag was missing. But again, this is not confirmed.

CASAREZ: And Rupa, how many days was it before her husband reported her missing?

MIKKILINENI: Two days, Jean, 48 hours. And he has an explanation for this.

He has told police and family and the media that the reason he waited is because she has vanished before. And she`s gone and taken the children with her to a hotel room when she was angry with him, and then come back the next day. So he thought he`d give her a couple days, is what he says.

Of course, this time, we know she didn`t take her children. She left her 5-month-old baby behind. And this is not likely.

CASAREZ: And everybody, we have tonight the parents of Margaret, who for four years now, have waited for her to come back.

Thank you so much for joining us, Eileen Haddican and Patrick Haddican, the parents.

I want to ask you, first of all, when did you find out that Margaret had gone missing?

We found out the Monday after she was missing.

CASAREZ: The Monday -- so how many days after?

P. HADDICAN: Six days.

EILEEN HADDICAN, MARGARET HADDICAN`S MOTHER: Six days.

CASAREZ: Six days after?

E. HADDICAN: Yes.

CASAREZ: How did you find out?

E. HADDICAN: The police called because they wanted the number for our summer place in Breezy Point. They were going to call security to have them check the house in Breezy, and that`s when we found out.

P. HADDICAN: Margaret used to love going to Breezy Point. It`s a summer place. And the police were asking for the local police precinct so they could contact those people, as well as those security people, to see if she might be in the home.

CASAREZ: So let`s look at these six days. She went missing on October 10th.

E. HADDICAN: Yes.

CASAREZ: Had you tried to contact her at all from October 10th and onward?

E. HADDICAN: Yes. I called her cell phone, but I didn`t get an answer. And then on that Sunday, I called the house, and Mrs. McEnroe answered and she said Margaret wasn`t there.

CASAREZ: And who is this, her husband`s mother?

E. HADDICAN: Yes. And that was -- I just said, "Tell her I called." And she said, "OK." And then we got a call from the police the next day.

CASAREZ: So she was missing. You called the home. But you weren`t told the truth.

E. HADDICAN: No. Correct. Well, she wasn`t there.

P. HADDICAN: Well, we were told that she wasn`t there. Not that she had been gone for five days and no one knew where she was.

CASAREZ: So when the police told you and you discovered six days later, what did you do at that point?

E. HADDICAN: I called Tim, who was down in Somerville. And he called me back when he got back.

And he said he had gone down there because the police told him he had to get a restraining order so Margaret couldn`t come back and take the kids, and that they had told him that Sarah (ph) couldn`t stay with him because he wasn`t a blood relative.

CASAREZ: And this is the older daughter that your daughter had had from a previous relationship.

E. HADDICAN: Right. And one of my daughters and I went over that day and we brought Sarah (ph) back to our house.

CASAREZ: Do you think your daughter would have left on her own accord?

E. HADDICAN: No.

P. HADDICAN: Not leave the children. No.

E. HADDICAN: No.

P. HADDICAN: We cannot see her doing that. She`s a tough cookie, to use a gentle expression. But she loves her children.

CASAREZ: And you adopted her, didn`t you?

E. HADDICAN: Yes.

P. HADDICAN: We have four children. The four are adopted. Margaret`s the oldest.

CASAREZ: What do you think happened?

P. HADDICAN: As far as we`re concerned, we only have two choices. One, she abandoned her children. Or there was some form of foul play. We really don`t know.

We almost have to hope that she abandoned her children, because the alliterative would be that she`s dead. And we haven`t accepted that.

E. HADDICAN: Right.

CASAREZ: We are taking your calls tonight.

Lynn in Texas.

Hi Lynn.

LYNN, TEXAS: Good evening.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

LYNN: Thank you. Did they live on the base or off the base? Has that been determined? And was he ready to go on a deployment, or was he returned from deployment?

CASAREZ: All right, Lynn. Good questions.

From what I understand, they both were former military, right?

E. HADDICAN: They`re former military, and they were living in Warren, New Jersey. And they weren`t being deployed anywhere because they weren`t active.

CASAREZ: But your daughter had actually helped save the lives of people during Hurricane Floyd that were being swept away by floodwaters.

E. HADDICAN: Yes.

P. HADDICAN: She did.

E. HADDICAN: She went in the water and tied a rope or something around her and a woman, and they were in the water for about three hours.

P. HADDICAN: We`re very proud of that.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CASAREZ: The morning of October 10th, his wife allegedly called him saying she needed baby formula. He went to the supermarket, he got it, he brought it home. He says that`s the last time he ever saw her, because he went to do a landscaping job after that from 1:30 to 3:00. When he got home, she was gone, but he did not report it to police until 48 hours later.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There are really two scenarios. One is that she simply walked away. Her husband told investigators postpartum depression, she had even been talking about a divorce.

Cops tell us there were no signs of foul play in the house at all. Nothing was turned over. No forced entry in the house.

P. HADDICAN: The day before she disappeared, she had come to our house because she made a phone call, and she was pacing and quite agitated. And I asked her, "Who`s on the phone?" She said, "It`s my (bleeping) husband, I should divorce him." And then the next day she disappeared.

MCENROE: I actually think that she wants to come back now, but she might be afraid to. A lot of people are looking for her, and she might be a little freaked out.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

Margaret Haddican was a former member of the U.S. Army. She was a member of the volunteer fire force in New Jersey.

And people, the way they describe her, is that she was a spitfire. If she was going to do something, she was going to do it. Now, on the one hand, people say that if anybody was going to leave on her own volition, that she would have the state of mind to do it. On the other hand, she would never, ever leave her children that were there.

I want to go to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation, joining us tonight from San Francisco.

Marc, during the break I just learned from Margaret`s father that she was going to have knee surgery. It was a very important knee surgery. She was wearing knee braces in the interim, but those knee braces were actually left at home. When she disappeared, she was not wears them.

Your thoughts on this disappearance?

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: Well, my thoughts is that this is an extremely responsible woman. She`s a firefighter. She`s a former veteran. She has both feet planted firmly on the ground. And there`s no way that she would just get up and disappear from all of those people that loved her.

And I think we have to look at this husband and the whole idea that his alibi is so incredibly self-serving. He -- you know, he conveniently is gone for 90 minutes. He conveniently doesn`t call law enforcement for a couple of days for some incredibly preposterous reason. I know that if I couldn`t find my wife I would be on the phone with law enforcement in a matter of moments.

So I think that, you know, we see this phenomenon often, that when somebody disappears, the first person you have to look at is, number one, the last person that saw them. It there`s a love -- if there`s a romantic relationship involved and that person disappears, and that`s the last person that saw them, that that person deserves an awful lot of scrutiny.

Now, Jean, something I`d really like to clear up here. There`s this whole concept that if somebody disappears, that you have to wait a certain amount of time before you report them missing.

Most jurisdictions, most people seem to think that`s 24 hours. As far as I can tell, that`s based on the Lindbergh Law, which was passed in -- as a result of the Lindbergh kidnapping in 1932. And that stated that if somebody hasn`t been recovered within 24 hours, it gives justification for the FBI to get involved in the case because 24 hours is plenty of time for somebody to have crossed state lines, making it federal jurisdiction.

CASAREZ: OK. Good points. Good points, Marc.

Joining us tonight once again are the parents of Margaret Haddican, Eileen Haddican and Patrick Haddican.

Her husband said from the beginning that he had just gotten $30,000 in cash for a landscaping job, and she had taken $11,000 in cash when she disappeared.

Did police find $19,000 in cash at the home when she went missing?

E. HADDICAN: I don`t know. I don`t know. He had told us, my daughter and I, that she had taken $4,000. And then I heard she had taken $7,000. And then I`d heard she`d taken $9,000. And it ended up to be $11,000.

CASAREZ: Had you heard that cash money like this was lying around the house, periodically?

P. HADDICAN: No.

E. HADDICAN: And I understand that when he gets paid for a job before it goes to the bank, it`s in the house, but I --

CASAREZ: Thirty thousand dollars?

E. HADDICAN: I would assume that they`d have a safe.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): Mom Margaret Haddican-McEnroe went missing, and then he waited. Husband Tim McEnroe waited 48 hours to report his wife missing, a delay some fear may have cost precious time in the investigation, time investigators will never get back.

Runaway? Foul play? Investigators don`t know for sure, but three little children do know they want their mommy back.

(on camera): This quarry was the latest anonymous tip in the search for Margaret Haddican-McEnroe. Searches were combing this quarry with dogs and on horseback for any search of Margaret.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: Help us find Margaret Haddican, Margaret Haddican-McEnroe. Her children are growing up without her. They don`t know what happened. They can`t believe that she would just walk away from her life, a life that she loved because of her children.

To Paul Penzone, former sergeant from the Phoenix Police Department, child advocate, joining us out of Phoenix.

If there was $30,000 cash lying around the house from a landscaping job, wouldn`t you take the whole thing if you`re leaving? Why would you only take $11,000 and leave $19,000?

PAUL PENZONE, FMR. SERGEANT, PHOENIX POLICE DEPT.: It doesn`t make sense at all. And Marc hit on a lot of the very important -- he really knows what he`s talking about when he comes to these cases.

First of all, it`s too much convenience in his alibi, the husband. I`m not going to point the finger, but it really bothers me. If he was concerned about her, why would she only take a portion of it? And it would lead him to believe there might be some concern as to why she took $10,000.

He didn`t call the family. And the 48 hours is far too long if you truly love and care about somebody to make that report.

The FBI issue and all those things are irrelevant. If there`s exigency, if there`s a domestic dispute, all those other factors that come into play, that`s a higher level of urgency for law enforcement to get more involved early on, because there`s a concern there for her safety.

So it really bothers me what`s going on with the husband. That`s where I`m going to have to focus my efforts.

CASAREZ: And no one has been named a suspect or a person of interest in this case.

To Martin DiCaro, investigative reporter.

Talk to us about an Army T-shirt that was actually found near the home the following Thanksgiving, I believe?

DICARO: Yes. The house was searched. The area around the house, the neighborhood was searched.

You saw the quarry. It was searched on foot, it was searched by helicopter. Margaret was last seen wearing an Army shirt, or an Army across it -- it was gray, the word "Army" across it.

CASAREZ: A sweatshirt, right?

DICARO: Yes, a sweatshirt and white plaid pajama bottoms. Not necessarily the clothes you`re going to wear if you`re going to take off for a while. And they did find one garment, but it didn`t give investigators any real solid leads as to what happened to her.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Has the husband been out searching?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No. And I`ll tell you, we`re not really sure what took place prior to the nine days when we arrived on the scene, but we really don`t want the family actively going out and participating in the search effort.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

PATRICK HADDICAN, FATHER OF MISSING MOM, MARGARET HADDICAN: It`s hard to believe under any kind of circumstances that Margaret would leave her children. It`s almost incomprehensible. She loved her children too much.

GRACE (voice-over): Would a young mother willingly leave her children, life and family all behind? That question caused two days to go by before reporting 29-year-old Margaret Haddican`s disappearance on October 10th, 2006. Friends and family thought maybe she was just blowing off some steam after an argument with her husband the day before, but surely, she`d return. That was almost five years ago.

PATRICK HADDICAN: I guess, it was about six days after Margaret had disappeared that we got a phone call from the warren police, and they didn`t even ask us or tell us that she had disappeared. It was just during the conversation that we found out.

GRACE: Her husband, Tim McEnroe, says he left her at home around 1:30 p.m. to buy baby formula at Margaret`s request. When he returned, his wife was gone, and their infant baby still in her crib was home alone.

TIMOTHY MCENROE, HUSBAND OF MISSING MOM, MARGARET HADDICAN: We had run out of baby formula, and I went to the store and got that and then came back and I went back out and I did another job and when I got back, she wasn`t here.

DET. BUCKMAN, COUNTY INVESTIGATOR: Warren Township did some preliminary investigation into her cell phone records to see if they could locate her. She left her cell phone behind. It was damaged earlier in a week. She did not take her cell phone with her, did not take a family vehicle with her.

PATRICK HADDICAN: I have some inconsistencies in my mind about what I understand has happened. I find it and my wife finds it very hard to believe that she would just up and go and leave her three young children. She was wearing knee braces, one on each of her legs. And for her to leave the house without taking her car and walking has me concerned.

GRACE: But allegedly missing with her, $11,000 in cash. There is no explanation as to why she`d want to leave, but no signs of foul play either.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Molly, please come home. Everybody misses you. We love you very much. The children need you, and they miss you very much. Please come home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone, but where?

Tonight, a beautiful young firefighter. She served our country. Mommy disappears from an upscale New Jersey home, seemingly vanishing into thin air, leaving behind three little girls. Husband, Tim McEnroe, reportedly leaves the home to buy baby formula, comes back, she`s gone. Mommy vanishes. Her 6-month-old baby girl alone in the crib. Friends and family say she would never do that.

Why did the husband reportedly wait two full days to report mommy missing? The beautiful mom`s car and cell phone left behind. Now, four years later, Margaret`s family is still holding out hope. We have not forgotten. Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, it`s basically one of three choices here. One, that she voluntarily walked away. Her husband said she`d been known to do that, but she always came back, and that`s why he waited two days. Another is suicide. Another is foul play. With us tonight, we do have the parents of Margaret Haddican with us, Eileen and Patrick Haddican. You are raising Sarah, who is her oldest daughter. How old is Sarah now?

EILEEN HADDICAN, MOTHER OF MISSING MOM, MARGARET HADDICAN: Thirteen.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Thirteen.

CASAREZ: Thirteen. And she was about 8 years old when her mother went missing?

PATRICK HADDICAN: Almost 9.

CASAREZ: Almost Nine. What does she tell you about that day?

PATRICK HADDICAN: Not very much. She doesn`t remember very much. She remembers that there was arguing the night before because she went to school that day when Margaret disappeared. But I don`t know if there`s something locked on the back of her mind that hasn`t come out. She hasn`t, really, I don`t think cleared the air for herself kind of. She just misses her mother very much. But I don`t know what kind of recollection she could have, and if she does have them, she`s pushed them way, way, way down deep.

CASAREZ: Caryn Stark, psychologist, joining us tonight out of New York. Hearing that answer, what do you think about Sarah? Does Sarah know more that could come forward in time?

CARYN STARK, PSYCHOLOGIST: Well, the fact that she was away at school, Jean, makes me wonder whether she really does know more. Of course, there are memories that do get pushed away even by adults when they`re very traumatic. So, it`s a possibility. What really bothers me is that not only does Sarah not have a mother, but she doesn`t have a story that goes along with it.

And there was fighting that was going on. There`s a real tendency for kids to blame themselves. So, here`s a mom that disappeared, and it certainly doesn`t sound like she wanted to leave. No cell phone, no car, can`t walk, and they find a T-shirt later on. She`s wearing pajama bottoms. So, I feel so awful for this little girl because I wonder how much she blames herself, somehow, for being a part of what happened.

CASAREZ: And she was old enough --

STARK: What children do.

CASAREZ: Yes. She was old enough. Mr. and Mrs. Haddican, you have taken polygraphs.

EILEEN HADDICAN: Yes.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Yes, we have.

CASAREZ: How many?

EILEEN HADDICAN: Just one.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Just one each. And two of our daughters did as well.

CASAREZ: What about her husband?

PATRICK HADDICAN: As far as we know, he hasn`t taken a polygraph.

CASAREZ: Has not. OK. To Joe Lawless, defense attorney and author of "Prosecutorial Misconduct," Randy Kessler, defense attorney, joining us out of Atlanta. First of all, Joe Lawless, why don`t you just take the polygraph, right? I mean, Marc Klaas is our shining example of someone that step forward and said do everything to me you can, and he has refused.

JOE LAWLESS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, Jean, from what I understand, he`s cooperated with the authorities to the extent of the polygraph. And frankly, if I were representing him, I`d advise him not to take it. Now, that`s a double edged sword because it immediately raises a specter of suspicion, but as her husband, he`s already under suspicion. That`s the first person the police look at. And I can guarantee you, they have gone up him one side and the down the other. They have looked at all this.

And simply refusing to take a polygraph doesn`t look good to a layman. It`s probably sound advice from a defense lawyer, but this is really a conundrum, because on one hand, everyone is saying she wouldn`t leave. On the other hand, her father described her as a tough cookie. And if there`s foul play involved, a tough cookie isn`t going to go lightly. And I don`t care how thoroughly somebody would try to clean up a scene.

We know enough about forensics to know there should be something somewhere. So, to me, this is a real tough, tough call. And I don`t know if I would take a police polygraph when he has to know, and if he`s represented by counsel, his counsel has to know, he is a principle suspect whether they`re saying it or not.

CASAREZ: To Randy Kessler, defense attorney, can this case be solved?

RANDY KESSLER, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: It can be. And you know, we have a thing called circumstantial evidence. There`s no body, there`s no person that we can find, but there`s a lot of circumstantial evidence. He not only didn`t tell the parents. He didn`t go and say to the parents, hey, I can`t find your daughter, help me. So, there`s a lot of circumstantial evidence, and she wanted a divorce. People do strange things when they hear their spouse wants a divorce.

CASAREZ: And tonight, please help us find Jaliek Rainwalker. He`s 12 years old. He vanishes November 1st, 2007 from Greenwich, New York. He is 5`6", 105 pounds, blond hair, green eyes. If you have information, call 518-692-9332.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Tonight, a beautiful young firefighter. She served our country. Mommy disappears from an upscale New Jersey home, seemingly vanishing into thin air, leaving behind three little girls. Husband, Tim McEnroe, reportedly leaves the home to buy baby formula, comes back, she`s gone. Mommy vanishes. Her 6-month-old baby girl alone in the crib. Friends and family say she would never do that.

Why did the husband reportedly wait two full days to report mommy missing? The beautiful mom`s car and cell phone left behind. Now, four years later, Margaret`s family still holding out hope. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Twenty-nine-year-old Margaret Haddican was living the life anyone could be proud of. The army veteran, volunteer firefighter and mother of three was home taking care of her young baby on October 10th, 2006, when she suddenly vanished.

PATRICK HADDICAN: We have hope that she`s alive. It gets a little more difficult as time goes on. You keep hoping and you keep hoping and you keep hoping.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Husband Tim McEnroe says he left the home around 1:30 p.m. for just 90 minutes to go get baby formula. And when he came back, there was no sign of her.

MCENROE: I work locally. I`m in and out a lot. And we had run out of baby formula and I went to the store and got that. And then came back and I went back out and I did another job and when I got back, she wasn`t here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Margaret`s car, her cell phone and other personal items all left behind. Authorities say they continue to actively pursue leads, and Margaret`s family is not giving up hope. A $20,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to the whereabouts of Margaret Haddican.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. Tim McEnroe, her husband, said that he didn`t report her missing for two days because she had such a mind of her own and her friend, Lisa, agreed with him, that maybe she would go out and come back later. Also, he said that that baby formula he got because she had wanted it. Margaret had wanted the baby formula, and it was substantiated. That baby formula was purchased at a store, but the question is, if you want baby formula, does that show a state of mind that you`re going to leave?

We have got Margaret`s parents with us tonight, Mr. and Mrs. Haddican. It is wonderful to have you here because you can give us this insight. And we want to know more about your daughter. After 9/11, she wanted to become a member of the U.S. army.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Yes.

EILEEN HADDICAN: Yes. Yes. She joined in 2002 and went to South Carolina --

PATRICK HADDICAN: Ft. Jackson.

EILEEN HADDICAN: Ft. Jackson, South Carolina.

PATRICK HADDICAN: South Carolina.

CASAREZ: She was medically discharged in 2004.

PATRICK HADDICAN: Yes.

CASAREZ: Why?

PATRICK HADDICAN: She was a -- she`s track vehicle mechanic of all things for a young girl, and she was doing something, and she smashed her thumb quite severely.

CASAREZ: But she became a stay at home mom after that, but also volunteer firefighter. And during hurricane Floyd, what did she do to help a couple survive?

PATRICK HADDICAN: There was -- the fire department was requested by a, excuse me, a dog kennel, for assistance in getting the dogs out of the kennel. There`s a creek that goes by the kennel, and the water was rising quite rapidly, and it was getting very high. And Margaret and another young fireman were there, and all of a sudden, the water, I guess, crested and overwhelmed the bridge where they were and washed all four of them into the water.

Margaret grabbed the woman, the owner of the kennel, and tied herself and the woman to a tree. They were there for several hours until they were rescued by the Bridgewater rescue squad, special water rescue squad. And she got a couple awards for that.

CASAREZ: She got awards for that. It`s amazing story. To Pat Brown, criminal profiler joining us tonight out of Washington, D.C., is that the type of person that abandons her family after saving the lives of others?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: It`s not working for me, I`ll tell you that. And here`s what I`d really like to know. The husband says he waits two entire days to even consider what happened to his wife because she`s done this before. Well, I would like to know when she did this before. Who did he call then? I mean, did she leave her car before? Did she abandon her children before? Did she just disappear off the face of the earth, because at that point in time, if she did it before, wouldn`t you have gone absolutely insane, crazy, and called everybody? So, everybody should know how many times she`s done this before.

CASAREZ: That`s a really good point. To Lira in Georgia. Hi, Lira. Do we have lira?

LIRA, GEORGIA: Hi.

CASAREZ: Do we have Lira in Georgia?

LIRA: Yes, this is she.

CASAREZ: Hi.

LIRA: Yes. I was wondering if the husband had been cooperating with police and if he`s had a polygraph.

CASAREZ: All right. He has cooperated with police in many respects, and no, Lira in Georgia, he has not taken a polygraph saying he did not want to do one that was instituted by law enforcement but would do an independent one. So, it has not been done. I want to ask you a little bit more about your daughter. Did anybody that you talked to after she went missing say that she had left the home for a couple of days and come back later?

PATRICK HADDICAN: No.

EILEEN HADDICAN: No. Her friend, Lisa, told me that she did go overnight, but she took the kids with her. And she would not have left her kids.

CASAREZ: How bad was the fight the night before she went missing? Between she and her husband?

EILEEN HADDICAN: I think it was during the day.

CASAREZ: OK.

EILEEN HADDICAN: And --

PATRICK HADDICAN: No, there were two fights the day before.

CASAREZ: OK.

PATRICK HADDICAN: She had come to our house, excuse me, after she had been seen an orthopedist arranging for surgery on her knees the following week. And she was arguing on the phone with Tim. That`s when she said that that bleeping husband of mine, I`m going to divorce him. And then, the next day, from what we understand, there was another argument, or that night, I`m sorry, after she left our house. That night, she had another argument and that the police were called. We don`t know who called the police.

CASAREZ: Now, that night, did she come over to your house?

EILEEN HADDICAN: No, she didn`t. She had called about quarter till 4:00 on Monday and wanted to know if she could bring the kids over and stay indefinitely if need be. And that she`d be over that night. And then she called later on that night and said she`d be over the next day.

CASAREZ: So, the situation was getting to a pinnacle, it appears as though, that the couple was about to separate. Something was about to happen.

EILEEN HADDICAN: Right.

PATRICK HADDICAN: At least that seemed to be in Margaret`s mind, yes.

CASAREZ: But her intent was to keep and protect the children.

EILEEN HADDICAN: To bring the kids to our house.

PATRICK HADDICAN: To our house.

CASAREZ: And all of a sudden, she`s missing without the children.

CASAREZ: Very quickly, Rupa Mikkilineni, what about the searches that have taken place? There have been some very targeted searches since she went missing close to where they lived.

RUPA MIKKILINENI, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, this is what`s interesting. The searchers actually started in a very delayed manner, Jean. In fact, police did not go out there and start searching until nine days after she was missing. This is about seven days after she was reported missing, of course. Now, there were many searches in the area. They actually drained ponds. They had dogs. They had ATVs, men on horses, searchers on horses searching.

And really, in all of these searchers, the only thing that sort of turned up which is just about a month and a half after she vanished was this army T-shirt. Now, in more recent years, in the last year, there have been other searches. Those have been targeted searches just based on leads or tips. For example, there is a tip that there was a shallow grave so they searched a 40-acre deer hunting area about 15 minutes away from the home.

This was just in the last one year. And then another search based on a psychic tip. Both led authorities nowhere. They didn`t find anything.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Question, is this information all coming from the husband or from other family members that she had vanished in the past for 24 hours?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Well, primarily, from what we were told, this is coming from the husband, but the police department has done investigation and interview with the family members now to get a better vibe on what`s going on.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother, disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tiffany Goines was last seen getting into red convertible in Frederick, Maryland. She was 12 years old and 5 feet tall at the time. She would now be 36.

Randy Leach was about to graduate from high school and went to a party on April 15th, 1988.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He, apparently, started at the party, and it went throughout the evening.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Sometime during the night of celebrations, Randy, a promising student and an athlete, vanished.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There was a lot of stories came out of the party that nothing has ever been substantiated that we know of.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He was never seen again. His family searches and prays.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: For some reason, we slept through the night, and I got up at 5 o`clock the next morning, and I looked out and the car was gone. I ran in to my husband. And we both ran outside. We knew something was terribly wrong. We just don`t know any more today than we did the day he disappeared. Randy`s car that we had just purchased for him, a mustang, a 1966 mustang, was being restored.

We keep it in our garage locked up. We still have it. He was our only child. We enjoyed him for those 17 years every day, and never thought like this would happen.

Raed Alfarah vanished from the south west side of Detroit, Michigan. His car was later found. At the time of his disappearance, he was about 5`10" and 180 pounds.

Nicole Johnson`s family was home the day she stepped out to smoke a cigarette on the porch, but as her sister remembers, Nicole got into a white car that pulled up, and she was never seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was approached by a white car, four-door white car. And from what my little sister said, she got in the car. She was real loving, caring. She`s real sweet, sensitive. That`s what I miss about her. Dealing with the loss of my sister has been horrible. We, the family, constantly wake up, daydreaming, dreaming about her, you know, just crying. Everything about her. We just want her back.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END

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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Thu Feb 10, 2011 6:56 pm

Nonnie Dotson: Nancy Grace America's Missing

Posted: 07:40 AM ET


Just four months away from leaving her post as an intensive-care nurse at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, TX Nonnie Dotson disappears while visiting family in Littleton, CO. The 33-year-old mother was taking some R & R while on leave for a pre-Thanksgiving holiday.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Nonnie10

She was supposed to step out to meet friends at a nearby smoothie shop just about a half mile away from her brother’s home. She informed her brother she was leaving, but that was the last time she was heard from. When her 16 month old daughter woke up crying the next morning family discovered Nonnie never made it home the night before. There have been no suspects or even the smallest shred of evidence to help police determine what happened to Nonnie Dotson almost 5 years ago.

Tipline: 303-271-5612
Reward: $100,000
Missing Since: 11/19/06
Missing From: Littleton, CO
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 33
Height: 5’3”
Weight: 115 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Clothing:
-Sleeveless grey hooded sweatshirt
-White t-shirt
-Black jeans



Air Force Nurse Missing

Aired February 8, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CANDICE DOTSON, MOTHER OF NONNIE DOTSON: That`s mommy. Somebody`s got her.

That somebody`s got her. And doing who knows what, you know, to her? She would be here if she could.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Friends and family describe Nonnie Dotson as a survivor. The 33-year-old has had her share of wins in life.

She beat childhood cancer. She worked her way to becoming an intensive care nurse in the Air Force. And most recently, she proved victorious in a courtroom fighting for back child support for her 16-month- old daughter. It`s going on five years since the single mother vanished from her older brother`s home in Littleton, Colorado, on November 19, 2006.

KEVIN DOYLE, STEPFATHER: Every time the phone rings, you jump. Every time somebody knocks on the door you jump. And it`s just -- it`s a cumulative effect.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: November 19, 2006, Dotson planned to meet up with friends for smoothies just about a half-mile away from her brother`s home. Before she left, she called down to her brother to let him know she was leaving. That was the last time she was heard from.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We have a woman that`s missing. And we`re waiting for some shred of evidence that will actually lead us in a more definitive direction. And we don`t have it yet.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Reportedly, her sister-in-law told authorities the 33-year-old left with an unknown female in an unknown vehicle. The night prior to her disappearance she spent out kicking up her heels to country music. While family says she met some people while out, there had been no commitments for future meetings.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is really a story that has led to a lot of dead ends for investigators. Sheriff`s department officials triangulated her cell phone. They did not turn up a location on the cell phone. The search dogs then went out, thought they had picked up a scent, did find a scent, but that scent went cold.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No activity on the cell, credit cards, or the Internet have led her family to fear the worst.

DOTSON: Nobody will forget you, Nonnie, and we`ll keep looking for you until we find you. OK? We just want you home. We just want you home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Families left behind, waiting, wondering, never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. Fifty nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone, but where?

Tonight, a brunette beauty, an Air Force nurse, Nonnie Dotson, vanishes on the way to the local upscale shopping mall. Her 16-month-old baby girl left behind. The young mom heads out for smoothies. Never seen again.

Tonight, who took American hero Nonnie Dotson?

To Jean Casarez.

Jean, give me the timeline.

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Well, the timeline is, back in November of 2006, she went on a vacation from San Antonio, where she was a critical care nurse, Lackland Air Force Base, Wilford Hall Medical Center. She went to Colorado to spend time with her brother, and she enjoyed it for a couple of days with him.

Then, all of a sudden, one afternoon she said she was going to go out for smoothies. And they don`t really know how she left, because she didn`t take her brother`s car but she was gone and she didn`t come back. And her little 16-month-old was still there. So in the evening, they called police and that`s how it all began.

GRACE: OK. Wait. I don`t get it.

Jean Casarez, she tells the brother to his face, I`m heading out for smoothies, or I`m going to meet friends? How did she have friends there? She didn`t live there. And if she said that to his face, didn`t he see her walk out the door or didn`t he say, how are you going to get there?

CASAREZ: He was in the basement with the children and with her daughter, and he didn`t see her leave. She did just say she was leaving, but he realized his car was still there.

She had taken the family`s car the night before to go out to do some good old Texas country western line dancing, but she didn`t take the car that afternoon. So it`s remained really a mystery of how she left the house.

GRACE: OK. Go through it one more time with me, Jean. So he`s downstairs, like, in a basement?

CASAREZ: With the kids.

GRACE: With the children.

CASAREZ: Playing with the kids, that`s right.

GRACE: Playing.

CASAREZ: She sticks her head in the basement and says, "I`m going to go. I`m going to go out for a while, run some errands" -- she mentioned the smoothie -- "Be back." And she didn`t come back. That evening, that`s when they called authorities.

GRACE: Joining me right now is Kate Battan, lead investigator, Jefferson County Sheriff`s Office, joining us from Golden, Colorado.

Kate, thank you for being with us. The scenario of her saying -- poking her head downstairs, saying, "Hey, I`m going out, I`ll be right back," did the brother assume she was taking the car?

KATE BATTAN, LEAD INVESTIGATOR: The way that it was reported to us, Nancy, is that she just yelled down and said that she was leaving. She never indicated she was going to the smoothie shop. She never indicated how long she was going to be gone.

So we later heard through other people, through hearsay, that other people were saying that possibly she went to that smoothie shop. We went to that smoothie shop which was about a mile away. So it`s unlikely that Nonnie would have actually walked there, and they had never seen her that day.

GRACE: Now, Kate Battan, why do you say it`s unlikely she would have walked there?

BATTAN: In talking to friends and family, Nonnie wasn`t much of a walker. And she`s in a very suburban area, and it`s a mile away just to get to where the businesses begin. And it would have been much easier and convenient and logical on a cold November morning to take a car.

Plus, she left her coat behind. So when she left, the last thing she was seen wearing was black pants, a white T-shirt, and a gray hooded sweatshirt. No coat.

GRACE: To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. Marc joining us today out of San Francisco, California.

Marc, that doesn`t even make sense. The whole scenario about her leaving doesn`t make sense to me.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: There`s ambiguity in the case file that I`ve read. Some says that she left with an unknown female in a white car, and other articles say that she said she was going to get a smoothie and had walked to the mall. So it`s very unclear even from the moment that she stepped out the door exactly what was going on with this young lady and what she had intended to do.

GRACE: Well, Marc, think about it, though. According to Kate Battan, the lead investigator in Jefferson County Sheriff`s Office, she didn`t even take her coat. That, alone -- whether you`re going to walk or whether you`re going to hitch a ride with a friend, or whether you`re going to walk to your car to get into your car, ultimately to get out to go to a shopping mall, why not take your coat?

I`m just having a problem with her even getting out of that house. I have got a problem right there. She didn`t even take her coat. It was cold, November.

KLAAS: Yes, I agree with you. No, I agree with you, that from the moment that apparently she walked out the door, nothing really makes a lot of sense.

GRACE: To Michael Board, WOAI News Radio, joining us out of San Antonio.

Michael, what do we know about her cell phone, her purse, activity in her bank or ATM card?

MICHAEL BOARD, WOAI NEWS RADIO: She took all of that with her from the house. She took her purse, she took her cell phone, she took her credit cards.

From the moment she left, there was no activity on her cell phone. There was no activity on her credit cards.

They did trace her cell phone to an area over by a highway not too far away from that home. They searched extensively for that cell phone, trying to find that. That cell phone was never found.

GRACE: Michael Board, when do we know the last time that she used the cell phone or that she was seen by anyone other than her brother?

BOARD: That would probably have been the night before. She had gone out dancing with some friends at a country western bar in the suburb of Dallas. She had struck up a conversation with several guys at this country western bar.

This was the night, early morning, before. They actually wanted to take her out to breakfast the next morning and she said, "No, guys, I`m sorry. I have got to get home to my little daughter."

So that`s the last time anybody saw her before her brother saw her that morning.

GRACE: Anything after she was at the country western bar, Jean?

CASAREZ: There`s a time gap there, because the bar closed around midnight. She arrived home, it`s believed, around 2:30 in the morning. So what happened during those two hours, that`s a mystery.

And also, Nancy, she logged on to a Web site -- she`s a single mom -- singleparentsmeet.com. She logged on to it when she got home that night, and then the next morning, and at 1:00 p.m., before she left the house.

Who did she talk to? What did she find out? Could that be a clue?

GRACE: OK. So I know she made it home from the country western bar because we have got her logging in that night. I know she was alive the next morning because she logged in.

I know she was alive at 1:00, unless somebody else snuck into the house and logged in under her name, which I don`t believe. I know she`s alive at 1:00 p.m. Now, right there, that`s where the trail goes dead.

To Kate Battan, the lead investigator, Jefferson County Sheriff`s Office, joining us out of Golden, Colorado.

Kate, I assume that law enforcement took the computer and read the hard drive to see who she was contacting. How do I know she wasn`t being picked up by somebody or contacting somebody to go have coffee or meet them?

BATTAN: Well, let me clarify a couple of things, Nancy.

First of all, we do know that she made two phone calls on the morning of November 19th. The first phone call, according to the cell phone record, it was at 10:30. She didn`t leave a message, and it was to a friend of hers who she`s known for many years. And she just called, she did not leave a message.

The second phone call was 11:15 a.m., and she actually called another friend that she was planning on spending the rest of her stay in Colorado with. And she left her message saying, "Hey, give me a call later on." That happened at 11:15.

We also know that at -- later on in that afternoon, that friend tried to call her back and no one answered the phone.

GRACE: What time was that?

BATTAN: It was some time -- she wasn`t sure exactly when it was, but it was some time after 1:00 p.m.

GRACE: OK.

BATTAN: As for the computer, we did do forensic analysis on the computer and the hard drive. We also (INAUDIBLE) and got information from all of her Web sites and her e-mail accounts. We also got a hold of her records on her cell phone and did a forensic analysis of those records.

GRACE: Well, what was she doing on the single parents Web site? Was she trying to meet somebody?

BATTAN: No. She was just checking e-mail.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: That is very, very disturbing, for her cell phone to stop pinging. In other words, it`s either cut off or the battery is dead. No ATM withdrawals, no credit card, nothing. She`s not out gallivanting or having a good time or doing a walkabout.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Well, that`s definitely some things that concern us, too. As far as the cell phone goes, we tried three or four times to, as they call, triangulate where that cell phone was, and we came up to the same location each time we did that.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): She served our country. She provided aid to our brave troops as a U.S. Air Force nurse. And now she`s gone.

DOTSON: Nobody will forget you, Nonnie. And we`ll keep looking for you until we find you. OK? We just want you home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: November 19, 2006, Nonnie told her brother she was going to a mall nearby to get smoothies with some friends and asked her brother to watch over her 16-month-old daughter. That was the last time anyone saw Nonnie.

JIM SHIRES, JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERIFF`S OFFICE: We have no indication that she has disappeared voluntarily or on her own, that she doesn`t want to be found.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: According to her sister-in-law, Dotson left in an unknown vehicle with an unknown female, and there`s been no sign of her since.

Friends waiting at the local mall say Nonnie Dotson never showed up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We have a woman that`s missing, and we`re waiting for some shred of evidence that will actually lead us in a more definitive direction.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls. The friends actually waiting for her at the mall, is that correct, Kate Battan? Her friends were waiting for her and she never showed up?

BATTAN: No, she was supposed to meet some friends later on that evening, but she did not have solid plans yet. The friend that she called at 11:15 actually called back to her cell phone at 1:15 p.m. and left a message. Nonnie did not answer the phone.

GRACE: See, that`s very odd, because the brother says it was around 1:00.

Didn`t she log on, Jean Casarez, around 1:00 to the singles Web site?

CASAREZ: Yes.

GRACE: The brother says around 1:00, she says, "I`m leaving," and see you later. And then at 1:15, already no answer on her cell?

Is that correct, Jean?

CASAREZ: Yes, 1:00 is when she logged on to the computer. She may have told the brother "I`m leaving" a little bit after that.

To Levi in Louisiana.

Hi, Levi.

LEVI, LOUISIANA: Hi.

It sounds like she had a lot of different boyfriends and numerous different people that she dated. Did police look into all of that?

GRACE: OK. Wait, wait. Hold on, Levi.

Why do you make that assumption? All we`ve said is she had a child and she went line dancing. Why did you assume she had -- you`re basically trying to say she slept around, it sounds like to me.

Why are you saying she had a lot of boyfriends?

LEVI: Well, the dad is saying that the baby was a bastard, that she`s logging into singles Web sites. I mean, did police look into all the different men she dated?

GRACE: May I ask you, Levi in Louisiana, if you`re married?

LEVI: Yes, I am.

GRACE: OK. You seem to frown down upon singles Web sites. But in this day and age, that`s how a lot of people meet each other.

I hear where you`re going. And I assume -- thanks, Levi in Louisiana, for that enlightened look on single motherhood.

To Darryl Cohen in (INAUDIBLE), you say that`s exactly where a defense would go as soon as we get a suspect in this case, that she was dating a lot of guys just because she went line dancing the night before.

Darryl Cohen, please don`t insult me by denying that that is where a defense would go.

DARRYL COHEN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I`m not going to insult you, Nancy, but the defense goes where it needs to go.

GRACE: So in other words, yes?

COHEN: The answer is yes. Clearly.

GRACE: What about it, Giudice?

RAY GIUDICE, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, let me just put a little better spin on it. What a defense counsel would do is show how many different people may have had opportunities to have contact with this lady before her disappearance. Male, female, and any other kind of person available. That`s what I would be doing, is to get -- deflect attention from my client.

GRACE: Now, of course, Jean Casarez, you`re not only reporting today, but you`re also a practicing lawyer as well. Jean, the state never has to prove motive. We don`t have to crawl into somebody`s brain and figure out what they were doing when they committed a crime. But in your analysis from what we know right now, who could possibly have motive?

CASAREZ: Well, someone that had an alibi. But here`s another piece of the puzzle. All right?

His name was Edward Vehle, and he was found to be the father of her child. They had a short relationship. He lived in San Antonio.

And she brought a paternity action after the birth of her baby because he didn`t want to claim parenthood. Well, it was found he was the father. Immediately, he was in the arrears of $10,000, $900 a month for child support.

And he allegedly told her, look, I`m going to try to get custody of the child. I`ll give it to my sister and then I won`t have to pay child support.

GRACE: So you`re saying $10,000-plus could be a motive for murder?

CASAREZ: Nine hundred dollars per month until the child is 20.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: So are you saying that somehow, because this young mom went out and had a good time, and stayed out late, and closed the place down, that somehow that`s connected to her disappearance the next day in the afternoon, after she`s been at home with her child and goes to get a smoothie?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy, it depends --

GRACE: Because she`s a party girl? Is that what you`re saying?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy, you know, it depends on who she met. Apparently in reports, she had some run-ins with some bad actors, bad characters that night.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Say, "Hi, mama."

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Sixteen-month-old Savannah is too young to understand why her mother is missing.

DOTSON: She would be here if she could.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But her grandmother knows something horrible may have taken her away.

DOTSON: That somebody`s got her. That somebody`s got her. And doing who knows what, you know, to her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Nonnie`s family is doing everything they can to find her --

DOTSON: That`s mommy.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: -- before her little girl asks where her mother is.

DOTSON: We`re trying not to think about that, but that`s the reality. Somebody knows.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: We are taking your calls.

Out to Sue in Georgia.

Hi, Sue.

SUE, GEORGIA: Hey, Nancy. How you doing?

GRACE: I`m good, dear. What`s your question?

SUE: Well, what about Nonnie`s parents? Where are they?

GRACE: Where are they right now or where were they at the time of the disappearance?

SUE: Well, both.

GRACE: OK. Hold on.

Keep Sue in Georgia.

To Michael Board with WOAI, where are the parents, now and then?

BOARD: The parents now, I believe they`re back in Colorado. They were living here in San Antonio for a short time while they were involved in a custody battle with Mr. Vehle over who was going to have full custody of little Savannah.

From what I know, from what I remember about this case, is in March of last year, Ed Vehle was given custody of Savannah while Nonnie`s parents, Savannah`s grandparents, were given grandparents` rights, which means once a month they could visit her. And from what I`ve been told, that`s been very contentious.

The past couple times, that Mr. Vehle has not allowed them to see Savannah. He`s fought an ongoing court battle to try to keep Nonnie`s parents away from Savannah.

GRACE: Now, wait a minute.

Jean Casarez, is that the bio dad?

CASAREZ: That is the bio dad. And according to documents -- and they use this in court -- when the little baby Savannah was born, a birth announcement was sent from Nonnie. He ripped it up and wrote, "It`s a bastard," and sent it back to her.

GRACE: And that`s who has custody right now?

CASAREZ: After she went missing, he filed for full custody. And that`s when the battle ensued, because the grandparents said he doesn`t want this child.

GRACE: I want to go back to Marc Klaas.

And of course we know that police have not named anyone, including the bio dad, a person of interest or a suspect. Nothing.

But, Marc Klaas, don`t most investigations, missing people or murder, start right there in the family? You start with who saw her last, they`re investigated. Then you go to lovers, boyfriends, husbands, ex-husbands.

What do you make of this?

KLAAS: Well, this bio dad seems like a complete jerk. There`s no question about that. But he has a very clean alibi for the time that she disappeared.

So in order to believe that he was involved, he would have had to have somebody follow her and track her for the various days that she was on leave, and then on that afternoon have had somebody kill her. So I don`t believe that at all.

I do believe he`s a creep, a jerk. He`s put the family through a lot of hardship. But I certainly don`t believe that he`s involved in her death.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That`s mommy. Somebody`s got her. That somebody`s got her and doing who knows what, you know, to her. She would be here, if she could.

GRACE (voice-over): Friends and family describe Nonnie Dotson as a survivor. The 33-year-old has had her share of wins in life. She beat childhood cancer, she worked her way to becoming an intensive care nurse in the air force, and most recently, she proved victorious in a courtroom fighting for back child support for her 16-month-old daughter. It`s going on five years since the single mother vanished from her older brother`s home in Littleton, Colorado on November 19th, 2006.

KEVIN DOYLE, STEPFATHER OF MISSING MOM, NONNIE DOTSON: Every time the phone rings, you jump. Every time somebody knocks on the door, you jump. And it`s just -- it`s accumulative effect.

GRACE: November 19th, 2006, Dotson planned to meet up with friends for smoothies just about a half mile away from her brother`s home. Before she left, she called down to her brother to let him know she was leaving. That was the last time she was heard from.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We have a woman that`s missing. We`re waiting for some shred of evidence that will actually lead us in a more definitive direction, and we don`t have it yet.

GRACE: Reportedly, her sister-in-law told authorities the 33-year-old left with an unknown female in an unknown vehicle. The night prior to her disappearance, she spent out kicking up her heels to country music. While family says she met some people while out, there had been no commitments for future meetings.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is really a story that has led to a lot of dead ends for investigators. Sheriffs department officials triangulated her cell phone. They did not turn up a location on the cell phone. The search dogs that went out picked up a scent, did find a scent, but that scent went cold.

GRACE: No activity on cell, credit cards or the internet have led her family to fear the worst.

CANDICE DOTSON, MOTHER OF MISSING MOM, NONNIE DOTSON: Nobody will forget you, Nonnie, and we`ll keep looking for you until we find you, OK? We just want you home. Just want you home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE (on-camera): It is my understanding that the grandparents, Nonnie`s parents, have actually left their home and moved to San Antonio, so they can be there to fight for custody or, at least, grandparents visitation rights with the little girl. What about it, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": That`s correct. Originally, they got protective custody of that little girl probably namely because of that birth announcement that was ripped and half and sent back with those words on it of what that child meant to the bio father, but they have lost that full custody.

GRACE: To Kate Battan, lead investigator with the Jefferson County Sheriff`s Office. I understand that all of the people that she came in contact with at the country western bar the night before have all been checked out and cleared. What about the brother? What about his story? Has he taken a polygraph?

VOICE OF KATE BATTAN, LEAD INVESTIGATOR, JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERRIFF`S OFFICE: No. Nobody in this case has taken a polygraph, and I will tell you, the polygraphs are just a tool, and oftentimes, they shut down communication. And I want to keep communication open with everybody in this case. So, we continue to do interviews. We`ve recently done new interviews of people who were briefly interviewed back in 2006, and we are still actively working this case.

GRACE: You know, Marc Klaas, we all know, most of us on this panel, either investigators, former prosecutors, defense attorneys, lawyers, we all know that polygraphs are a tool just like, you know, forensically looking at a computer or checking out phone records. It`s a tool. It may or may not be entered into evidence, but as I recall, you did not have any protests whatsoever when police checked you out when your daughter, Polly, went missing. You`d be happy to take a polygraph or give DNA.

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: There`s no question about that, and I find it incredulous that they`re afraid of asking the brother to take a polygraph for fear that it`ll break down communication. I would think that he would want to volunteer to do that as would any other member of the family just to clear themselves and move on and find out what actually did happen.

GRACE: Agree or disagree, Stacy Kaiser?

STACY KAISER, PSYCHOTHERAPIST: I agree 100 percent. It`s often the people that are closest to someone missing that are guilty.

GRACE: To Tom Shamshak, of course, obviously, the brother is not a suspect or person of interest, but it seems to me that Marc Klaas is right. That everybody close to her would be happy to take a polygraph just for general purposes.

TOM SHAMSHAK, FMR. POLICE CHIEF: I agree wholeheartedly. I`m right on the same page with you there. I find it very difficult to believe that the brother only heard her voice, and then later, in the media he is saying caustic things about her that, oh, that she had closed down the bar. I think he needs to be examined a lot more closely than the authorities are doing at this particular point in time, Nancy.

GRACE: Of course, not a suspect, not even a person of interest. Is that correct, Kate Battan? Was it the brother that said she closed down the bar?

BATTAN: I believe that he did say that in the media, but in terms of the interviews, we have interviewed Tony Dotson on multiple occasions. And I don`t have anybody that I have named a person of interest nor have I named anybody that I`ve cleared.

GRACE: All of the people close to her, people that she came in contact at the bar the night before, the bio dad of the little girl, the brother, the last one to see her, have they been approached about taking polygraphs?

BATTAN: There has been some discussion with some people who I`m not going to name about potential polygraphs, but again, I want to keep the communication lines open.

GRACE: Well, I`m sure you just heard Marc Klaas, who is a crime victim. His daughter was kidnapped and later murdered. Police asked him to cooperate with polygraphs, DNA, search his place. He was happy to do it. It`s been four years. Do you think that these people would be happy to take a polygraph, to volunteer for a polygraph if it would help the investigation, Kate Battan?

BATTAN: You would think so.

GRACE: Excuse me?

BATTAN: I`m not sure I understand your question.

GRACE: Well, it seems to me, I mean, you`re hearing Marc Klaas, who`s the father of a young girl, his daughter, that was kidnapped and murdered later. He was happy to give a polygraph. Having been a crime victim, myself, it`s my belief that a crime victim`s family would be happy to give DNA or a polygraph if that would further the investigation. OK. She`s been gone four years. Don`t you think that the family would be happy to -- or the people she saw at the bar would be happy to take a polygraph?

BATTAN: Again, I think the polygraphs tend to shut down communication --

GRACE: Why?

BATTAN: And now, those communication lines are open.

GRACE: But why would it shut down communications? I don`t know what you`re talking about.

BATTAN: Because it`s a very accusatory thing asking some people to take a polygraph.

GRACE: What about it, Marc Klaas?

KLAAS: I never thought that they were really accusing me of anything when they asked me to sit down for the polygraph. I just felt that they were trying to clear me, as they explained to me, so that they could move on to other possibilities. You know, they need to deal with family members. They need to deal with registered sex offenders in the community. They need to deal with strangers.

They`ve got all of these scenarios that are out there, and you never really arrive at the truth until you eliminate the various scenarios, and obviously, the place to start with that is in the home and with the people that are closest to her.

GRACE: And of course, Marc, I`m sure you agree with me that a missing persons case is not a mixer at the fraternity house. It`s not a tea party, all right? She could be dead. People need to line up and volunteer for a poly.

Everyone, tonight, please help us find the missing woman, Rebecca Gary, 32 years old, vanishes Christmas day 1988, Baton Rouge. 5`1", 105 pounds, brown hair, green eyes. If you have info, please call 225-389- 2000.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. We want to help.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE (voice-over): She was set to meet friends at the Jefferson Village shopping mall for girl talk and a smoothie, but Nonnie Dotson never made it. The 33-year-old mother and U.S. air force ICU nurse just months from finishing her military duty goes missing without a trace.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators continue to look for clues but with no activity on her cell phone or bank account. Authorities are running out of leads.

GRACE: The investigation uncovers an expensive child support battle between Dotson and her baby`s father, but he`s been cleared by police with proof he was nowhere near Colorado around the time Dotson disappears.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The family has raised $100,000 reward hoping the large amount offered could bring about new leads.

GRACE: Do we know, Kevin McGue (ph), whether she ever made it to the smoothie shop? I think I`ve got --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No, she, apparently, did not. Again, this is a situation where it was a ten-minute walk, and apparently, where they located not only the pinging but the scent was also about ten minutes away from her brother`s house. All indications say, no, she never did.

DOTSON: Nobody will forget you, Nonnie, and we`ll keep looking for you until we find you. OK? We just want you home. Just want you home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE (on-camera): We are taking your calls. Out to Margaret in Florida. Hi, Margaret.

MARGARET, FLORIDA: Hi, Nancy. Oh, it`s such a privilege to talk to you.

GRACE: No, it`s my pleasure. Thank you for calling in. What is your question?

MARGARET: I love what you do.

GRACE: Thank you.

MARGARET: My question is, I watched your show last night, and the interview with the husband. He did not look stressed at all. He had like a smirk on his face, you know? And I`m also wondering how come the cell phone that was broken, how come the police didn`t do anything about that? Have psychologists interviewed him or anything like that? Because his demeanor, he didn`t look like he was sad at all.

GRACE: You`re talking about Margaret Haddican. Yes. The former military, left behind children, including a months old baby girl, sleeping. Yes, I don`t buy that for one minute. So, your question is about his demeanor? Do I have Margaret with me? Was her question, Liz, about his demeanor? You know, I think she`s right. I think Margaret -- she`s right about Margaret`s husband. His demeanor was like completely flat affect. What about it, Jean? You saw it, too.

CASAREZ: I watched his eyes. And the eyes could not look the interviewer straight in the eye. They were shifty eyes, and that always, that body language always sends up alerts.

GRACE: Yes, the thing is, though, Raymond Giudice, Darryl Cowen, as much as body language tells us, you can`t build a murder case on it, Darryl.

DARRYL COHEN, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: No, you can`t build a murder case on it, but Nancy, let me go back to the polygraph and the DNA. I completely agree with you about any scientific evidence regarding DNA search warrants. Polygraph, you and I have both been through this. It depends on the examiner, it depends on the person, it depends on their nervous system. And I don`t like them. I use them only as a tool of last resort.

GRACE: Put him up. But you just said, eh-eh, I don`t like them, but you use them, don`t you, Darryl Cowen? Just a yes/no. Do you use them?

COHEN: Sometimes and very rarely.

GRACE: OK. So, I say, I assume that as much as you don`t like -- remember, I`m a JD, not a DDS. I don`t know how to pull teeth, but you just said you do use them and you use them as an investigative tool. That`s what you said in a crazy roundabout defense attorney way. What about it, Giudice?

RAY GIUDICE, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, I don`t like them when they`re being used to create a theory of culpability.

GRACE: Nobody said that.

GIUDICE: Wait a second. What everybody is saying including Marc Klaas is, let`s get everybody in the inner circle. Let`s them (ph) all take polys and let`s see who shows some deception so they can become a person of interest. Poly should be used to confirm a theory, not to create a theory.

GRACE: Really? Says who, Ray Giudice?

(CROSSTALK)

GIUDICE: You mean, the same constitution that doesn`t let them come into trial evidence? How about that constitution?

GRACE: That`s not in the constitution, actually. And as a matter of fact, Ray, if you would be so kind to give me the same opportunity that I`ve given you to spout off, recheck your criminal code.

GIUDICE: Uh-huh.

GRACE: Because polygraphs, if stipulated by both sides --

GIUDICE: If stipulated.

GRACE: As I was saying, don`t make me cut your mike, because right now, nothing would make me happier. Do come into evidence as stipulated, so they do come into evidence in criminal cases, and they do come into evidence.

GIUDICE: Pick the -- tell me the last one that it came into evidence. Pick your case, show me. They never come in.

GRACE: Let`s see. Obviously, there`s the glaring case of O.J. Simpson. The whole world knows about that. So --

GIUDICE: Yes, and --

GRACE: And I can also point out, as I was saying. OK, Liz, you can go ahead and cut his mike. As I was saying, in cases that I have had, we used polygraphs and stipulated ahead of time. And then after the attendant failed it, they took a guilty plea. So, chew on that. Back to the lines. Pam in New York. Hi, Pam.

PAM, NEW YORK: Hi, Nancy. I would like to know, this woman was in the military. Is it possible that she had post-traumatic stress syndrome and killed herself?

GRACE: No. She was out the night before having a great time at a party. She was meeting friends at a mall. Her body, I mean, her body has never been found. There`s no evidence she had post-traumatic stress syndrome and killed herself. Michael Board, is there any evidence she had PSTD?

MICHAEL BOARD, REPORTER WOAI NEWSRADIO: No, none at all. She was not on medication. She was on medication. She had prescribed drops for her eyes, and she did not take that prescription eye drop with her. So, if you`re asking, you know, was she a runaway? Obviously not because she probably would have taken that prescription with her, but as for PTSD, no. No signs whatsoever. Never been in counseling, never been treated, nothing for PTSD.

GRACE: Jean.

CASAREZ: She was going to be discharged from the military in four months, and she was excited because she was thinking about moving back to Colorado where she originally was from.

GRACE: Francis in Pennsylvania. Hi, Francis.

FRANCIS, PENNSYLVANIA: Hi. She`s a very attractive woman, and I was wondering, did she have a stalker, people who were stalking her in the army?

GRACE: You know what, that`s a good question, and virtually, impossible to locate. The possibility of a stalker. What about it, Michael Board?

BOARD: She was a nurse. She did come into a lot of contact with a lot of people. She helped, she saved lives. You could think maybe one of those people might still have some unrequested love for her, but you know, this is a scary thing. I remember a report. This was about five years ago, and I remember talking to a family member and that family member had asked Nonnie about, you know, her time in San Antonio, her time as a single mother, some of the problems she had had with her custody battle.

And at the time, from what I remember, is that Nonnie had told her family, whom I believe is her brother saying, you know, there were times that I remember, I felt like someone was watching me. And if you`re a mother and you got that intuition, that`s a very scary thing.

GRACE: I want to go back to you, Marc Klaas, we know that in this case, there`s no suspect, there`s no person of interest, but in most murders, in most disappearances, you`ll find the perp close to the victim, within the family. I`m talking about husbands, exes, boyfriends, a member of the family, then you step out, but it could have been as simple as someone grabbing her of the street, Marc Klaas.

KLAAS: It could have been that. It also could have been somebody close in the sense of the last people to see her were the people at the country and western bar the night before.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: I don`t like it. Here`s the father of this baby. He`s 53 years old. He`s a grown man. He should know better. What`s he doing not cooperating with police? All this time passing, and finally, he breaks down and talks to police? What`s the holdup?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, I`m not going to characterize it that way. I mean, it sounds like the gentleman did what -- anybody who is smart would do in the beginning, somebody disappeared, police are asking questions, the media gets involved. You need to ask an attorney to help you.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, mother, disappears. Families left behind, wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Kyanja Vanwey is missing from Des Moines, Iowa. She disappeared five years ago, and at the time, had a pierced nose and scar on her right hand. Her nicknames are Kiki and Carrie.

Eve Maestas vanished from Wagon Mound, New Mexico in June of 2009. Her mother is desperately searching for her girl.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She was at home the night before she disappeared. I went into her room, and there was a candle that had been burning for quite some time. I just started to call all her friends and, you know, ask if she was with them. And her laptop was on and, you know, she wasn`t home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you have information, call 1-800-the lost.

Jeremiah Huger was playing in his yard with other children when an unknown male called the child over and kidnapped him. Jeremiah would now be 30.

Twenty-one-year-old Joab Hudson was last seen leaving his father`s home in Georgia just over a month ago. Since his disappearance, Joab`s stepmother says his bank account has not been touched, and his cell phone has not been used.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He had his wallet, from our understanding, which had his bank card in it. No cash that we`re aware of. He was wearing a gray hooded sweater with his high school logo (INAUDIBLE) on the front, blue jeans and some romper boots. Didn`t have any enemies that I know of at all. I mean, everybody just attached themselves to him when they, you know, there wasn`t a stranger he met.

Overall he`s a great kid. I mean, he`s one of those kids that woke up every morning, made his bed every morning, you know, military style. The only person I`d ever trust to watch my children, you know, to get off the bus. Very loving, caring person. Would be there for anybody, you know, at the flip of a hat.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Brian Andrew Hayes and Mark Anthony Degner were in their early teens when they vanished from Jacksonville, Florida in 2005. They may be in each other`s company and in the local area.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

END



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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Thu Feb 10, 2011 7:01 pm

The Skelton Brothers: Nancy Grace America’s Missing

Posted: 03:39 PM ET


Tanner, 5, Alexander, 7, & Andrew, 9 mysteriously vanish Thanksgiving day. The young boys were with their father, John Skelton, and were supposed to return to their mother after a scheduled visit, but never did.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Skelto10

The boys’ father allegedly first told police he gave the children to a woman because he planned to hang himself and didn’t want the boys to witness the suicide. His suicide attempt failed and Skelton was placed in the hospital for a mental evaluation. After a massive search across state lines for the 3 missing boys, police declared the father’s story about a woman was a lie, and investigators now say the case has turned into a homicide investigation.

According to police, since the boys vanished, their father’s story has changed several times. John Skelton, now charged with 3 counts of parental kidnapping, says now that he would never hurt his children. His latest story is that he put his 3 children in hiding, giving them to a secret organization in order to keep them safe.

With the missing boys’ father’s story allegedly changing constantly and massive search efforts turning up empty, we still don’t know the location of the missing boys. Please help us find Tanner, 5, Alexander, 7, & Andrew, 9 Skelton.

TIPLINE: 517-458-7104
REWARD: $10,000

TANNER LUCAS SKELTON
Last seen: 11/25/2011
Where: Morenci, MI
Age: 5
Height: 3’6”
Weight: 40 lbs
Hair: Blonde
Eyes: Blue
Clothing:
-Camouflage pajama pants
-Scooby-Doo shirt

ALEXANDER WILLIAM SKELTON
Last seen: 11/25/2011
Where: Morenci, MI
Age: 7
Height: 3’9”
Weight: 45 lbs
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Clothing:
-Black pajama pants
-Grey shirt

ANDREW RYAN SKELTON
Last seen: 11/25/2011
Where: Morenci, MI
Age: 9
Height: 4’1”
Weight: 57 lbs
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Clothing:
-Brown pajamas with orange trim



Missing Michigan Boys

Aired February 9, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No one knows what the future holds. Please remember to tell your loved ones each day that you love them. Life is short, and it can be taken from you in a heartbeat.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): November 26, 2010, residents of a small southern Michigan town are wrapping up the Thanksgiving holiday. This year`s celebration is different for the Skelton family.

Parents John and Tanya Skelton have recently separated, and their three sons, Alexander, 7; Andrew, 9; and 5-year-old Tanner are spending the holiday with their dad. He is scheduled to return the brothers home to their mother that evening, but they never make it.

Tanya Skelton frantically calls the police.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Everyone`s just distraught. Nobody knows what to do with themselves or how to help, and just feel helpless and hopeless.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The boys` father, John Skelton, claims he handed his sons over to Joann Taylor, a friend he met on the Internet. He allegedly didn`t want the boys home when he attempted to commit suicide. Police investigate the mystery woman and soon begin to doubt her existence.

LARRY WEEKS, MORENCI POLICE CHIEF: At this point we have been able to eliminate the reported established relationship between Joann Taylor and Mr. Skelton.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Firemen will also be out there with -- and police officers on some of the four-wheels, the gators (ph).

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: As police and volunteers launch a wide-scale search for the boys, John Skelton is arrested. Once behind bars, his story changes. Skelton now claims he left his sons with a so-called rescue group The United Foster Outreach, an underground sanctuary. The police don`t buy it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No such organization can be located or determined to be the factual place for children.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nearly three months after the Skelton brothers vanish, their father, John Skelton, sits behind bars awaiting his court date. He maintains his innocence and that he gave his sons to a rescue group.

JOHN SKELTON, FATHER: That they`re making it a murder investigation does not mean that the boys are dead.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Meanwhile, family and friends continue to search for the boys, fearing the worst, but in their hearts praying Andrew, Alexander and Tanner return home alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The goal is still to bring the boys home. So still, keep looking. Still, keep praying. Because that is the goal.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

JEAN CASAREZ, HOST: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. They disappear. They vanish. Their families are left waiting and wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. For 50 nights, we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children and girls, mothers and boys, fathers, sisters, brothers and grandparents. They`re gone. But where?

Tonight, to Michigan. Three little brothers just 5, 7, and 9 years old all together. They vanish without a trace.

They were last seen with their father this last Thanksgiving, John Skelton. He claims he gave the boys away to a woman he met on the Internet to bring the children to his estranged wife so he can go kill himself. But the suicide attempt fails.

Well, then Skelton claims he gave the kids to a secret organization nobody, not even he or the cops, can locate. Why? To protect the boys from their mother.

Cell phone records reveal Skelton may have crossed into Ohio right before the boys disappear. Volunteers, they search farms and lakes and creeks, but no sign of the boys.

Police now say they believe the boys are dead. Yet, they still haven`t found their bodies. And father John Skelton is now speaking out from behind jailhouse walls, where he sits on a $30 million bail. He`s saying they are alive.

We have that interview tonight. You can listen to the father, John Skelton, yourself.

Tonight, where are Tanner, Alexander and Andrew Skelton?

Let`s go straight out to Tom Wait, reporter of CNN affiliate WXYZ, joining us tonight from Detroit, Michigan.

Tom, you are the one that got the interview with John Skelton, the father. And let me tell you why we care so much. This is the last person that was known to be with these three little boys, and we want to get into his mind because we want to find these boys. That`s the whole point.

So, Tom, how did you get the interview?

TOM WAIT, REPORTER, WXYZ: Well, Jean, thanks for having me on the show, first of all.

We reached out to John Skelton through a postcard at the beginning of December. We sent him a letter saying, "Hey, do you want to tell your side of the story? We haven`t heard from you."

He had uttered very few words in some court appearances. He wrote us back -- or actually, he called us last week, on Tuesday. I spoke with him at length, probably about 40 minutes on Tuesday. He called me several more times.

One of the first questions I asked him of course is, "Where are the children? Where are your sons?"

His answer is that he did not hurt them, that he has given them to an organization called Underground Sanctuaries. So right now he says he doesn`t know where the boys are, but he did not hurt them. He says that he was trying to protect them from his estranged wife, Tanya Skelton, though police have cleared her of any wrongdoing in this case.

CASAREZ: All right.

And everybody, he has been charged with parental kidnapping. That is why he`s behind bars. Thirty million dollars bail on that one.

And Tom Wait, is it true that he contacted you the day that investigators labeled this a homicide case and not a missing persons case anymore?

WAIT: That`s correct. He contacted us last Tuesday.

He called me -- actually, I was at home before I had come into work. He had no idea that police were about to change the investigation from a missing children`s case over to a homicide case. He was very perplexed by it, or at least very interested in why the police were changing over the investigation.

He says that there`s no evidence that he has done anything wrong to the kids. He was adamant that he had given these kids over to this organization. But there are many holes in this story. He couldn`t describe to be exactly --

(CROSSTALK)

CASAREZ: And Tom, what is the timing for that phone call from John Skelton?

I want to go to Ellie Jostad.

Let`s start from the beginning. And the beginning wasn`t that long ago. It was Thanksgiving Day.

Ellie, take it from there.

ELLIE JOSTAD, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: That`s right, Thanksgiving Day. The three boys are with their father. The parents are in the midst of a pretty ugly divorce and custody battle, but they had scheduled court- ordered visitation with their dad that day.

The next day, they were supposed to be returned to their mother. That never happened.

Now, initially, the father said that he gave the children to a woman named Joann Taylor. He says that he met her when she had a flat tire, he helped her with that. Later, they kept in contact over the Internet.

He says he gave the boys to her because he planned to kill himself and he didn`t want the boys in the home. Now, as Tom explained, that story has since changed. Now John Skelton is saying this is an Underground Sanctuary that he has given the boys to.

CASAREZ: All right. And it goes on and on and on and on.

I want to go back to Tom Wait, reporter, CNN affiliate WXYZ.

Did you ask him why, why the kids are alive and why he did this?

WAIT: Yes. I definitely got to motive right away.

I said to him, "Why would you do all this? Why would you put yourself through this?" Because he had said, you know, "I`m the only one volunteering to be in jail right now." And by that he meant, I did nothing wrong, I was trying to protect my kids.

His allegation is that his ex-wife -- or his estranged wife, I should say -- was abusing the kids. But again, police have said that she is not guilty of any wrongdoing in this case.

She does have a prior sex offender conviction from about a decade ago. So John says that that`s kind of where this comes from.

He believes -- he says his kids said to him that Tanya, his wife, was abusing them. So he was trying to protect them, he says, by giving them to this organization, Underground Sanctuary --

(CROSSTALK)

CASAREZ: All right. And everybody, Tom, we want everybody to hear this interview that you got in regard to this alleged "sexing." Let`s take a listen.

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

SKELTON: The boys told me that Tanya was -- they put it -- "sexing" them, which I tried to confirm with Tanya, but Tanya wouldn`t have anything to do with me. She wouldn`t talk to me about it or anything, and alienated me and started -- started alienating the kids from me and stuff. And I have to go with I don`t think my kids would lie to me.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

CASAREZ: All right.

Ellie Jostad, when he says "sexing," I don`t know if he means sexting, and I didn`t know 5, 7, 9-year-old boys sexted, or if he`s talking about something else. But we do have to lay out the facts here. The mother in all this, Tanya Skelton, is a registered sex offender.

Explain. It`s back from 1998.

JOSTAD: Right. That`s right.

She was convicted of fourth-degree criminal sexual contact. That involved a 14-year-old boy that worked for her then-husband, and it was my understanding or my recollection that this boy did something like yard work at properties they owned or something along those lines. But yes, she does have that in her history.

CASAREZ: All right.

We are taking your calls tonight.

To Bill Foster, joining us. He is a neighbor of the Skeltons. He led one of the major searches, volunteer searches, for these three precious little boys.

You know, Mr. Foster, the facts are also that three different judges have given Tanya Skelton custody of these little boys knowing full well what her criminal background was. What is the latest, and what are the police telling the family at this point?

BILL FOSTER, NEIGHBOR: Well, they had changed the case over to a murder investigation. And her name is "Tanya," not "Tonya." And a lot of this story about John calling out from the jailhouse was after his family was notified of the case being changed over.

John`s not stupid, by no means, but he is guilty of a lot. From what I take it, they do have evidence in this case, or they would never tell the family nor the public, you know, where we stand.

CASAREZ: Has Tanya helped law enforcement at all with --

FOSTER: Absolutely. Any --

CASAREZ: No, I know she has. But with where she believes are precious little boys are. Because she knew that man, she knew the highways he drove has a long-haul truck driver.

FOSTER: Right.

CASAREZ: She could aid in that.

FOSTER: Well, I mean, she has -- anywhere that she knew where John, you know, had been, or has been, or had family in, she`d been 100 percent cooperative with the FBI and the Morenci Police Department.

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

SKELTON: I was just -- I was spiraling out of control. Tanya -- I was depressed. Tanya played with my emotions to get the reaction that we got.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Why do you think they switched this to a murder investigation? What do you think leads them to believe that your kids are dead?

SKELTON: There`s nobody to corroborate seeing them. There`s no pictures of these people. We covered our tracks really well.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE (voice-over): John Skelton, the father of the three missing Morenci boys, reaches out to Action News from his jail cell. Skelton has uttered only a few words in public. That is, until now.

SKELTON: I`m probably the only one here volunteering to be in jail.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Are your kids alive or -- I mean, is that what you`re saying by -- that you`re volunteering?

SKELTON: Yes. I refuse to let them go back to Tanya.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Skelton has been sitting behind bars since shortly after Thanksgiving. He was the last one to see the boys alive. John says he did not hurt his sons.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you know where the kids are?

SKELTON: No. Unfortunately, that has escaped me as well.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: Where are Tanner, Alexander and Andrew? They all were together. They all disappeared together, all three of them, at the very same time.

We have gotten a call in from the Morenci chief of police that wants us to spread the word, to make sure that everyone knows that John Skelton`s whereabouts are unknown from 3:30 p.m. Thanksgiving afternoon until 1:30 p.m. on Friday. So if anyone out there knows of his whereabouts at that time, they are asking you to come forward.

I want to go to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation, joining us from San Francisco.

Marc, listen to this. It has just come out through these interviews with John Skelton behind bars that he actually did a computer search shortly before the boys went missing. And listen to what it was for -- neck breaking and poison. He says that it was because the boys were interested in those topics.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: Little children are not interested in those kind of macabre topics. I`m startled that he had a 22-hour window to dispose of those boys.

I think this man is a monster. I think he`s a pathological liar. His story changes more frequently than the weather.

It should be noted that in one of the recent court appearances, he asked his wife why she wasn`t wearing her wedding ring. Yet, he thinks that she`s having incest with their children? He wants to get back together again?

I think that the authorities are going down exactly the right track with this man and looking at this as a homicide investigation. The problem is, though, Jean, with that huge of a window, he could have taken those children anywhere within hundreds and hundreds of miles and gotten back within that 22-hour window. It`s going to be extremely difficult to locate them.

CASAREZ: We`re taking your calls.

Donna, in Florida.

Hi, Donna.

DONNA, FLORIDA: Hi, Jean.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

DONNA: Thank you for taking my call, dear.

CASAREZ: You`re welcome. Your question?

DONNA: Yes, ma`am. I was wondering if the father is a hunter or a woodsman. Maybe if so, have they asked any family members for any familiar hunting grounds that maybe if he did harm his children, which I believe he did, that maybe that`s where he went back and took the kids?

CASAREZ: Great question.

Bill Foster, neighbor of the Foster (sic) family, joining us tonight from Morenci, Michigan.

Is there any background? Because there`s a lot of hunters in your area.

FOSTER: Right.

CASAREZ: Any background of John Skelton in that area?

FOSTER: No. John wasn`t an avid hunter. I mean, he does have family that are very avid hunters.

We have checked a lot of properties. You know, John worked for some big farmers around here, so of course he knew a lot of the land, which, you know, we have checked and double-checked -- dogs, police agencies, civilian searchers. You know, it`s like three needles in a haystack, if you will.

CASAREZ: And I`m sure especially now, you`ve got, what, four feet of snow?

FOSTER: Yes. We`ve got a lot of snow.

CASAREZ: Wow. OK.

Pat Brown, criminal profiler, joining us tonight from Washington, D.C.

Law enforcement definitely, from the beginning, they have put their focus on John Skelton. Remember in the beginning they said, "We do not believe this is going to have a positive ending"? And they kept saying that and saying that and saying that.

But Pat, is there any way possible that they have too much tunnel vision toward John Skelton?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Not in this particular case. I mean, I like what the Morenci Police Department has said and what they`re doing, and how forthright they are.

He has told stupider and stupider stories. If he gave his kids away to this organization to hide them, he gave them away to maybe pedophiles. And on top of that, he says he wants to get them back but he`s going to kill himself. So who are they going to give them back to? His wife?

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

SKELTON: I miss them terribly. I played with them almost every single day that -- well, every single day that I was home. And I talked to them every single day. I miss making them pancakes.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re going to start at this road, and we`re going to make a line to the north.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Volunteers, some who know and many who have no connection to the Skelton family, as well as dozens of firefighters, doing line searches through the rural area. The idea of leaving these children alone is something they just can`t tolerate.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`ve known the family for a long, long time. So we`re just out here helping. Anything we can do to help.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Where are these boys? And if they were harmed, who did it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We need calls. We need tips. Anyone that`s out there, no matter how incredible you may think it is, call.

SKELTON: I was just -- I was spiraling out of control. Tanya -- I was depressed. Tanya played with my emotions to get the reaction that we got.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

Here`s how it really all began.

Last fall, John Skelton, he and his wife, Tanya, were having marital difficulties. He takes the children out of school. He ends up with them in Florida. And he may have had the intent to keep them there.

Tanya takes him to court. They come back to Michigan. But the whole issue is he kept them alive. He didn`t do anything. His state of mind was he wanted to keep them, but he sure didn`t kill them. Now he`s saying those kids are alive, but he hasn`t done anything to harm them.

I want to go out to Tom Shamshak with us tonight from Boston, former police chief, joining us, private investigator.

OK. They`ve got to find these three precious little boys. He`s the key. That`s what law enforcement says.

So what do they do now?

TOM SHAMSHAK, FMR. POLICE CHIEF: Jean, good evening.

My analysis of this is that they have compelling forensic evidence that is coming out of the lab. That`s why they have changed this from a missing persons to a homicide case. They`re going to ramp up the pressure on him. And maybe in the future they`ll try to get him to at least, you know, with a plea deal, identify their whereabouts.

But what I would be doing, I would be doing a geographical profile. This was a trucker.

I would look at the routes that he typically drove in his employment and go to those areas that he may have stopped at overnight, and look in those various areas. I mean, he may have disposed of the children in a dumpster, but you can`t rule out bodies of water at these various locations along the routes where this man has traveled -- Jean.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police pleading for anyone who may know anything about what has happened to these missing brothers to come forward.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Well, we remain hopeful. That`s why we`re doing what we`re doing here, that we`re going to find these boys and bring them home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No one knows what the future holds. Please remember to tell your loved ones each day that you love them. Life is short. And it can be taken from you in a heartbeat.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: November 26th, 2010, residents of a small Southern Michigan town are wrapping up the Thanksgiving holiday. This year`s celebration is different for the Skelton family. Parents John and Tanya Skelton have recently separated, and their three sons, Alexander 7, Andrew 9, and 5-year-old tanner are spending the holiday with their dad. He is scheduled to return the brothers home to their mother that evening, but they never make it. Tanya Skelton frantically calls the police.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Everyone`s just -- just distraught. Nobody knows what to do with themselves or how to help and just feel helpless and hopeless.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The boys` father, John Skelton, claims he handed his sons over to Joanne Taylor, a friend he met on the internet. He allegedly didn`t want the boys home when he attempted to commit suicide. Police investigate the mystery woman and soon begin to doubt her existence.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: At this point, we have been able to eliminate the reported established relationship between Joanne Taylor and Mr. Skelton.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Firemen will also be out there, and police officers on some of the four-wheels, the gators.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: As police and volunteers launch a wide-scale search for the boys, John Skelton is arrested. Once behind bars, his story changes. Skelton now claims he left his sons with a so-called rescue group, the United Foster Outreach, an underground sanctuaries. The police don`t buy it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No such organization can be located or determined to be a factual place for children.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nearly three months after the Skelton brothers vanish, their father, John Skelton, sits behind bars awaiting his court date. He maintains his innocence and that he gave his sons to a rescue group.

JOHN SKELTON, FATHER OF THE THREE BOYS MISSING: That they`re making it a murder investigation does not mean that they -- that the boys are dead.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Meanwhile, family and friends continue to search for the boys. Fearing the worst, but in their hearts praying Andrew, Alexander, and Tanner return home alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The goal is still to bring the boys home. So still, keep looking. Still keep praying. Because that is the goal.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. How could three little boys disappear all together, all three of them, at the very same time? Five, seven, and nine years old. They were with their father. It was Thanksgiving afternoon. And that was the last time that anyone saw them.

To Ellie Jostad, when was the last known sighting of these three little boys from someone other than John Skelton?

ELLIE JOSTAD, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, police have told us that someone saw the boys playing in the father`s yard at 5 o`clock on Thanksgiving Day.

CASAREZ: All right. And Ellie, I think, you got the phone call from the police chief from Morenci, Michigan during the show wanting to make sure that we got the news out of the window where John Skelton cannot be accounted for, right?

JOSTAD: Right. Chief weeks actually called another one of our producers and said that it was Thursday, Thanksgiving Day, 3:30 p.m., till the following day, Friday 1:30 p.m. That they cannot account for the dad, John Skelton`s whereabouts.

CASAREZ: That`s a ten-hour period right there. He had those boys, and he`s a long-haul trucker. I want to go to Tom Wait, reporter, CNN affiliate, WXYZ. You are the one that got the interview with John Skelton from behind bars. He is being held on $30 million bail. Parental kidnapping is the charge, at this point, for those three boys. What did he say to you?

TOM WAIT, REPORTER, CNN AFFILIATE WXYZ: Well, you know, he got very emotional when he talked about his wife and his kids, but essentially, our first question, of course, was what happened to the kids? And he insists, as you heard there in bits and pieces of the interview, that he did not hurt them. But he does say something interesting, and you heard this in part of the show here. He says, he was spiraling, he was depressed.

I asked that question in response to a Facebook post that he put out the night before the boys were last seen alive. He said "May God and Tanya forgive me." Now, he wouldn`t explain what that exactly meant, but he said was spiraling and very depressed, and that was a very ominous message, obviously, the night before the boys went missing. Again, he`s saying --

CASAREZ: All right. Tom, we have got that. We want everybody to listen to this. This is John Skelton, the last person to have been with the three little boys, his sons that disappeared. Everybody, listen to this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SKELTON: I was just -- I was spiraling. I was spiraling out of control. Tanya -- I was depressed. Tanya played with my emotions to get the reaction that we got.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: And John Skelton has also admitted behind bars that, yes, he did a computer search a few days before the boys went missing. Why? Well, the boys wanted to do it. They were interested. They had seen a G.I. Joe show on television, so they wanted to learn about neck breaking, and they wanted to learn about poison.

I want to go to Wendy Walsh, psychologist, joining us today -- tonight from Los Angeles. Wendy, something very concerning was found on the MySpace page of John Skelton. It`s a poem that he wrote some time ago, but it was entitled "The Dumpster." Wendy, listen to this as I recite some of this poem and give me your thoughts.

It says, quote, "I`m your little boy." And remember, this is a little boy in a dumpster. "I`m your little boy. So, mom, please stay. I`m cold and alone in this metal room with plastic bags and a worn out broom. Nobody hears my call for you. Come back mommy because I need you. It`s my dying breath, and I see a glow. It`s an angel from heaven, and he`s taking me home" -- Wendy.

WENDY WALSH, PH.D., PSYCHOLOGIST: Mm, mm, mm. Well, you know, I would analyze this probably as looking at the child inside him. I think this loss of Tanya, his wife, is something that`s been eating him up. It`s mommy he wants to come back and save him. Truthfully, this entire event happened because of his anger at Tanya. And for him to say she was playing with my emotions so that she would get the result she got, that`s his way of saying she tormented me.

It`s a paranoid way of looking at your own emotional chaos and saying she did it to me, she tormented me, it`s her fault that this badness happened, and that I`m spiraling out of control and then asking for forgiveness on Facebook? I mean, all of this makes an emotional case. A psychological detective would say, OK, here`s the little boy in him feeling like he`s dying without his mommy and then enraged and spiraling and then asking for forgiveness.

This tells me that, you know, he probably did something really awful to his children, but only to get back at his ex-wife.

CASAREZ: And John Burris, could this poem "The Dumpster," be part of the premeditated plan to do away with these three little boys, his state of mind, and the thought would be to dispose of them in a dumpster?

JOHN BURRIS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Well, it goes both ways. I mean, obviously, it goes to his mental state of what he was thinking about, and certainly, one could be -- it could be used in that sense. But also, it can also be used from a defensive point of view as well. I mean, after all, when you use that statement like that, you`re talking about premeditated murder, you`re talking about three kids, you could be looking at a death penalty-type case here, and this statement itself could also mitigated against that as well. So, it goes both ways. It turned it helps the prosecution, but it also helps the defense as well.

CASAREZ: And also tonight, please help us find Walter "Bo" Brawner. He is 67 years old. Vanishes June 10th, 2008 from Shepherd, Texas. He is a white male, 5`4", 120 pounds, with gray hair and blue eyes. If you have any information, please call 936-653-4367.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace. Send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Prayers tonight for Andrew, Alex, and Tanner, the three Skelton Brothers police say remain in grave danger the longer they go missing. No one has seen them since Thanksgiving, and everyone here is praying they`re out there somewhere and safe. They have dozens of volunteers searching this tiny town for any signs of the little boys, working with few if any leads, neighbors here traipsing through wooded areas, even streams.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s devastating to them to know that they don`t know where the boys are.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is the boys` father, John Skelton. His sons were last in his care Thanksgiving Day. Out of work, separated, and a neighbor says depressed. He tried to hang himself and told police he wanted his boys out of his home when he did it. So, he gave them to a woman he has an e-mail relationship with, even though, their mother was just a block away. Police and now even the FBI unable to find that woman or confirm she exists. Bottom line, they don`t know hat`s happened to the boys.

SKELTON: The boys told me that Tanya was, they put it sexing them which I tried to confirm with Tanya, but Tanya wouldn`t have anything to do with me. She wouldn`t talk to me about it or anything and alienated me and started just -- started alienated the kids from me and stuff. And, I have to go with, you know, I don`t think my kids would lie to me.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: John Skelton the father of these three precious little Skelton Brothers speaking out behind bars, wanting his story heard. To Tom Wait, reporter from WXYZ, CNN affiliate. Tom, why do you think he really picked up the phone and called you wanting to do this interview? Why?

WAIT: And I think that`s a great question, and I`m not a psychotherapist, obviously, but I would say, from my assessment of why he called me, I think he really wanted to talk to Tanya. He says in the interview that he wanted to speak with her, that he wanted her to come visit him in jail, and that she would not even place a phone call to him. If you listen to that interview, and I know you have, Jean, he says over and over again, Tanya mistreated me.

Tanya played with my emotions. Tanya made me depressed. This is why I`m acting the way I am. And he also says that his wife was abusing his kids, but yet, he still says he wants to see her. So, I think, really, the reason why he was reaching out to me, I think, he wants her to be -- to hear his voice. I think he wants her to get the message that he still loves her, that he still wants to talk to her. So, I think that`s the kind of twisted mind we might be dealing with here. That`s just my assessment.

But from what he said is he literally says he wants to talk to her. And he says in the interview that she should listen to her instincts. That the kids are still alive, and that he cites a magazine interview where she thinks he still is a good father. That she says she believes that he wouldn`t ever hurt the boys. he Keeps --

CASAREZ: And Tom, we have got that from your interview, where John Skelton confirms that the children are alive. Everybody, listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SKELTON: I am probably the only one here volunteering to be in jail.

WAIT: Are your kids alive? Or, I mean, is that what you`re saying by that you`re volunteering?

SKELTON: Yes. I refuse to let them go back with Tanya.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation, joining us from San Francisco. What do you think about that? Tanya won`t talk to him, and that`s understandable. I understand that, but we want to find the boys. That`s the goal. Do you think she should talk to him?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: No. Why should she talk to him? He`s taken the things that meant most to her in life. This is a vengeance killing pure and simple. She wants those children. He`s ensured that she can`t have those children. If he can`t have her, she can`t have the kids. Case is closed.

CASAREZ: Right. Right. I agree with you. To Tom Shamshak, private investigator, former police chief, joining us out of Boston. Here`s where I`m going with this. Any jailhouse interview is recorded. So, you go into jail, it`s going to be recorded. Law enforcement`s got that. It will go into the hands of prosecutors, can be used at trial. The point is to find the boys. Could he tell her things that he`s not telling anybody else that could help in the investigation to find them?

TOM SHAMSHAK, FMR. POLICE CHIEF: Jean, he could, but I have to agree with Marc. I don`t think that there`s any benefit. I think what they should do is go for the death penalty, and you`ll see him squirm pretty quickly, not wanting to, you know, face death. I think that`s the only thing that`s going to unseal him. I don`t see him providing any more information.

CASAREZ: Well, John Burris, defense attorney, joining us out of California, here`s the issue. He has been charged with parental kidnapping. John, that is one year maximum, two years maximum, and you`ve got three kids. So, it is $30 million bail, but there`s not much of a term of imprisonment here. How can the deal work?

What can they do to get answers out of him because he`s not charged with kidnapping or murder yet? But once he`s charged with that, that`s a life term in Michigan. Not much weight for him to confess. Not much motive for him to confess.

BURRIS: Well, there`s no motive for him to confess what these minor - - what the relatively small charges against him. If the prosecution has evidence that he committed a crime or close to it, then they really should charge him with something significant that will create an incentive. Although, I will say -- I thought to disagree with others who think that the wife should not go speak with him. I don`t -- there`s nothing ventured, nothing gained here.

She obviously would have to be a decoy in a way that she`s got to give up something and talk to him in ways to get his confidence as a parent. And I think there`s nothing to be lost in that regard. You can always cut the deal at some later point when you want to find the children with greater charges filed, but at this stage of the game, I don`t see why she shouldn`t be used to go in and talk to this person and see what can happen.

Each of their emotions are pretty high, but I don`t -- I disagree that she should not make an effort if there`s any chance of him talking.

CASAREZ: I agree with you. Boy, I`d be in there in a second because I`d want to do anything to find my boys. Anything. To Debbie in New York. Hi, Debbie.

DEBBIE, NEW YORK: Hi, Jean.

CASAREZ: Thanks for calling.

DEBBIE: My question is when did this case turn into a homicide investigation?

CASAREZ: Well, coincidentally, it turned into a homicide investigation the very same day that Tom Wait, reporter from CNN affiliate, WXYZ, gets the phone call from John Skelton. It was about a week ago. To Tom Shamshak, former police chief, that`s a very important development in this case for them to now call it a homicide. They`ve known it`s a homicide for a long time, is my instinct. Why did they suddenly come out with that publicly last week?

SHAMSHAK: Jean, again, my analysis is that they received correspondence from the forensic lab confirming the analysis that might indicate that there are three separate blood types that are there, could be linked to the children. And, so now, they`re moving forward, but I suspect, just based on my experience, that that is what has occurred here, that they`ve got results from the lab, and they`re moving forward -- Jean.

CASAREZ: That`s interesting. Also, I think, based in good faith of all of that, also as a pressure tactic, possibly, to John Skelton to come forward because they know he`s the key. To Wendy Walsh, psychoanalyst, joining us from California tonight, I think Marc Klaas hit it on the head when he said this was a revenge killing. I can`t have you, then you can`t have your kids.

WALSH: That`s my suspicion here. I think that he is not only still in love, his version of love, with Tanya, but he`s obsessed with her. He`s stalking her. He`s doing whatever he can to get her to show up at prison, to hear his words through a reporter. This guy wants her there. And now, Marc`s right. Why should we reward that behavior? Why should she show up?

But the truth is this is a mother who loves her children and wants to get them back or have some closure on this atrocity, this tragedy. So, could she be used as a decoy? Absolutely. Because he might say things to her that he wouldn`t say to anybody else.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SKELTON: Just stop treating me this way because I didn`t do anything wrong. I was trying to find a way to get people to talk to me to get her to talk to me.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CASAREZ: Tonight, the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, another sister, a brother, a father, or a mother, they disappear, and the families are left behind, wondering, waiting, and hoping. Let us help them find their loved ones.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tilawna Cheatham was last seen at a convenience store near her home in South Carolina. She was 9 years old. You`re now looking at an age-progressed photo indicating how Tilawna would look today. Help find her.

Jon Haynes was last heard from the Boulder, Colorado area when he called his father back home in California.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He had just graduated high school. He made valedictorian. My father bought him a brand new car. He drove it out to Colorado a month before his dorms opened, so he could get a job. He called us when he arrived. Two days later, he was gone. He had picked up a hitchhiker and that person had contacted us after this, when he went missing. They never found a body. The day he was supposed to call us back, he didn`t.

And two days later, his car was found in very suspicious circumstances out by a dump. The windows were down. The keys were in the ignition. All of his belongings were gone, and it was raining. This is a car that was four days old. It`s been horrible. It`s really a nightmare. You can`t explain to somebody. My father and mother looked for him for, you know, a good ten years really actively, and then I sort of picked it up from there when they just couldn`t bear to do it anymore.

Jon, he was all sorts of fun. He was really great. He was an amazing skier, and he was silly and just a tremendous amount of fun.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Clinton Nelson was last seen leaving a friend`s home in Louisiana in September 2006. He is 6`1" and about 160 pounds.

Shane Walker was just a toddler when he disappeared from his mother`s sight in the blink of an eye at a park in New York City.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I let these two little kids play with Shane in the park. It was a boy and a girl. This man came and sat by me while on the park bench while I was sitting there, and I turned my head for a second. when I turned back, Shane and these two kids that I let him play with, they were gone. And then I panicked, started hollering, screaming. So, I assume my baby got sold for black market. Definitely, he`s alive. He`s alive somewhere. I`ve just got to find him.

Stephanie Benton was traveling with a female friend in Bullhead City, Arizona. The two were separated, and Stephanie has been missing ever since. If you have information, call 1-800-the-lost.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. Until then, we will keep looking.

END



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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:50 am

February 9, 2011

Scott Kleeschulte: Nancy Grace America’s Missing

Posted: 09:43 PM ET


It was the last day of first grade for 9 year old Scott Kleeschulte. His family had plans for a dinner celebration, but Scott never made it there. After getting off the bus from school Scott went home to change and then head to a friend’s house to play.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Kleesc10

The friend said he would join Scott outside in a little bit but when he went to look for him, Scott was gone. A storm came through that afternoon. Scott was afraid of them. When he didn’t return home his parents first thought perhaps he sought refuge at a friend’s house, but after the storm cleared there was no sign of the boy.

Tipline: 314-949-3300

Missing Since: 06/08/1988
Missing From: St. Charles, MO
Classification: Stranger Abduction
Age at Disappearance: 9
Height: 4’4”
Weight: 60 lbs
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Brown
Identifying Marks:
-Scar on chin
-Freckles across nose
Clothing:
-Black “rude dog” t-shirt
-Khaki pants
-Red & black high-top sneakers



Scott Kleeschulte Missing for 24 Years

Aired February 10, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on the NANCY GRACE show.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every day you think about it. Every time the phone rings or something, you think. There`s not a day goes by that you don`t think about it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nine-year-old Scott Allen Kleeschulte had a lot to celebrate. It was the last day of school, and the family planned on going out that night for a fun dinner. After school, Scott arrives home. He changes and heads out to play with friends. But suddenly, a powerful thunderstorm comes down, and Scott never makes it back home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: ... able to put his picture out yet, and that is just -- that would be too hard, to just sit and you know, have to walk by and see it. All of my stuff was put away of his. I can`t handle that part of it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home. Police immediately began searching the area for any sign of the 1st-grader. Bloodhounds reportedly tracked Scott`s scent from his home to a wooded area nearby, but no sign of the little boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Spread along there and just (INAUDIBLE) up the hill.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth. And that`s why we still do hold out some hope. We would expect that there would be some article of clothing or some piece of evidence which would indicate that Scott drowned. But to date, nothing has been located.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: After focusing on a series of man-made caves in the wooded area, investigators have run out of leads. But Scott`s family has never given up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other. Down deep, I think there is hope. I mean, you can`t give up. And I just got a gut feeling that something might come out of this.

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we -- 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone. But where?

Tonight, St. Charles, Missouri, June 1988, the last day of school. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte looking forward to the summer. Scott, Mom, Dad, four brothers and sisters plan a big family dinner that night. After school, Scott comes home to change into play clothes, then walks over to a friend`s house. His sister sees her little brother standing on the top of a hill just yards away. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte never seen again. Tonight, where is 9-year-old Scott? Straight out to you, Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, GUEST HOST: And it was June 1998. And Scott played outside a lot. He did that all the time, especially after school. But that day, a ferocious thunderstorm came into the area. It was a June storm, and it was really violent, they say. It moved on. It wasn`t there for that long. But after that, Scott Kleeschulte was gone.

I want to go out to David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com. This was a very big day. He had just graduated from the 1st grade. The family was going to go out to dinner that night. But once that thunderstorm passed, they couldn`t find him. What happened, Scott? (SIC)

DAVID LOHR, AOLNEWS.COM: Well, Jean, it was June 8th, 1988. He went to school that day, got home about 3:30 in the afternoon, ran inside, changed into his play clothes and was going to go across the street to play with one of the neighborhood kids. Well, that kid was still eating dinner. He wasn`t ready to come outside yet. So Scott decided to play on his own. He went outside. The storm broke out around 4:30. And his sister left to go to work. She saw him playing outside on the hill up the street, and that was the last time anybody seen him.

GRACE: Joining us is David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com. To Ellie Jostad, "NANCY GRACE" producer. The family said that little Scott was always afraid of storms, so they thought that maybe he had hidden somewhere until the storm passed, right?

ELLIE JOSTAD, "NANCY GRACE" PRODUCER: That`s right. And they started getting concerned -- Mom and Dad got home from work at about 5:15. The storm had since blown through, but he hadn`t returned home. She sent -- the parents sent his brother, Richard, who`ll be joining us shortly -- sent him out to look for his little brother. He started running around the neighborhood, checking out places that they played together, started asking other neighborhood kids where he might be, and they could find no sign of him.

CASAREZ: No sign at all. And joining us tonight, a very special guest. And we appreciate so much for him coming on with us, is Richard Kleeschulte. He is the brother, and he was very close with his brother, Scott. Richard, thank you very much, coming to us from St. Louis, Missouri, tonight. Tell us exactly where your family lived in Missouri at this time.

RICHARD KLEESCHULTE, BROTHER: In St. Charles, Missouri, probably 30 miles, I guess, outside of St. Louis.

CASAREZ: So very, very close to the big city. How did you find out that Scott had disappeared?

KLEESCHULTE: I mean, I lived in the house and he just didn`t come home. So I mean, it was kind of self-explanatory.

CASAREZ: So was it your last day of school also? You were in a different school, but your last day?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Yes. I got out probably about 30 minutes before he did.

CASAREZ: Did you see him at all at home before he went out to play?

KLEESCHULTE: No. I did not see him that day at all.

CASAREZ: Who was the last person to see him?

KLEESCHULTE: As far as I know, family and friends, would have been my older sister, Stacy (ph), before she left for work and stuff. She was there when he had come home and changed after school and that. So as far as I know, it was Stacy.

CASAREZ: And what did Stacy see?

KLEESCHULTE: He was -- the last time she had seen him, he was at the top of the hill just playing, running around, being a kid like we did. You know, I know people say not to play in the streets, but that`s where we played, up at the top of the street. And that`s where he was.

CASAREZ: And this was a fairly urban but rural area, too. You were sort of out in the country, right, where kids just could feel free to play?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. It was a neighborhood. I mean, it was a neighborhood full of 100 kids, probably, in the neighborhood, but you know, right five minutes from our house was nothing, farmlands and fields and dirt trails and stuff like that.

CASAREZ: How violent was that storm late afternoon? And did you think your brother had just hidden to have cover?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. It was a pretty bad storm. You know, it just came and went pretty quick. You know, I don`t think he hid, necessarily, like, hid somewhere. We just assumed that he was inside someone`s house, you know, playing inside with another friend, you know, and that`s just kind of -- then started knocking on doors, on every door we could.

CASAREZ: When did your parents finally call police?

KLEESCHULTE: It was later in the evening. I can`t -- you know, I`m not for sure on the time, 8:00, somewhere around there. It was, you know, before it had gotten dark.

CASAREZ: And I understand they came right out.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Yes. They were there right away, yes.

CASAREZ: So what did they do that evening and the next day and the next few days and the next week?

KLEESCHULTE: That night, I`m not -- you know, it`s pretty vague for me because I was young. So that night, you know, I can`t remember exactly what all, what they did. But that next morning was full-fledged. They had a search party set up with dogs and helicopters and horsebacks and you name it, you know, anything that you had back at that time, they were using.

CASAREZ: You know, Michael, you were the closest in age. You and your brother, Scott, were very close. What did this do to you at that time? You were only 12, and all of a sudden, your brother is gone off the face of the earth.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. I mean, it`s -- it`s life-changing. There`s no doubt about it. It just -- it shook us all up. You know, he`s my best friend and I just miss him.

CASAREZ: And for all these years, the investigation has stayed active and we will go through everything they did. But I want to bring something up front right away. In 2007, a man was arrested. And suddenly, your family hears -- that man`s name was Michael Devlin, and your family suddenly hears that two young boys were kidnapping victims that survived. And this was only 20 miles away from where you lived. I`m talking about 13-year-old Ben Ownby and Shawn Hornbeck what were both kidnapped by Michael Devlin. What impact did it have on your family to suddenly find out that two living kidnapping victims were found?

KLEESCHULTE: Well, first off, you know, it brings back a lot of the pain and the memories. You know, you start thinking about all that. But it also gives you hope. And you know, you`re also so happy for them families that find their missing sons. But you know, it gives you hope in a way that miracles do happen, and someone could have did that with my brother. And you know, the thing is, is they just never found him. So he could have just went on living the life with that guy and being raised, you know, hopefully, in a good home with someone, is what you think, I guess. You know, I mean, it just -- it shocks you to the core.

CASAREZ: Richard, we are here tonight to help in that search for your brother. We want to show everybody a picture of your brother, Scott Kleeschulte. He was 9 years old when he went missing. That is a picture of what he looked like. Look at that picture. He had freckles across his nose. He had brown hair and blue eyes, a scar on his chin. At the time, he was wearing a Rude Dog (ph) T-shirt, khaki pants, red and black high-top sneakers.

And there`s a picture of age progression, what he would look like now. I want to go to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. Marc, this case struck me the minute I studied it because of the location, very close to St. Louis, Missouri, very close to where Michael Devlin was arrested for kidnapping.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: And he could very well be involved in this case, as well.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`ve never been able to put his picture out yet. And that is just -- that would be too hard.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott Kleeschulte was 9 years old when he disappeared in St. Charles, Missouri, a St. Louis suburb.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Family says Scott was seen just at the top of this neighborhood hill by his sister, heading out to play. But then a storm strikes. A witness reportedly claims to see Scott after the rain starts, but nobody knows where the little 9-year-old ended up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth, and that`s why we still do hold out some hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police launch a full-scale investigation, looking for the boy on ATVs, by air and by horseback, but Scott nowhere to be found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott Kleeschulte`s family doesn`t even know what Scott looks like today, if this age progression image even comes close. But they refuse to give up looking for him.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. This adorable little boy got off the school bus, walked to his home, and he wanted to play. School was out for the summer, so he changed his clothes, he went outside, and that was the last that really anybody ever saw from him.

I want to go to David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com, joining us tonight. David, there have been at least a couple of sightings, it`s believed, at least early on that someone saw him before he went missing. What do we know?

LOHR: Yes. There was a couple sightings in various states. Law enforcement looked into them, but they`ve never -- nothing`s ever came of any of it. A number of those sightings came in in the early `90s. Thy had taken the age-progressed photo. They put it on a bunch of advertising mailers and sent them out all over the United States, but nothing ever panned out. He was never identified.

CASAREZ: It was 50 million mailers that went out over the country. But Ellie Jostad, "NANCY GRACE" producer, what I`m thinking about -- wasn`t there a sighting shortly before he went missing? Somebody in a vehicle believed they could have seen him playing close to the house?

JOSTAD: Right. There was a report that someone had seen him playing near these caves. Now, this is a series of caves that were carved out of this hillside. And this is something that local kids had made. These were al quite unsafe, this whole labyrinth of kids that -- of caves that the kids would play in. And someone claimed that they saw him near there. They actually took those caves all apart, dug as deep as 40 feet into the hillside, and were never able to find any clues there.

CASAREZ: What about a scent dog, Ellie? Because this is interesting. Listen to this, everybody. Ellie?

JOSTAD: Right. Well, there was also a report, a man, a bloodhound handler said that his dog picked up Scott`s scent and actually traced it about a mile-and-a-half away to a construction site where an apartment building was being built. Again, they were never able to substantiate any sort of clues, never got any further than what that man says his dog picked up.

CASAREZ: And joining us tonight once again is the brother of Scott. Richard Kleeschulte is joining us tonight. You and your brother -- I know you said that your brother was your shadow as you were growing up. He really looked up to you, didn`t he, Richard.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes, yes. Just like, I mean, I looked up to my older brother, he pretty much did the same thing.

CASAREZ: When investigators and police were just combing your area, they believed that he had gone to a certain creek or something, and you had to convince authorities that your brother didn`t like that creek, you didn`t go there?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. At the beginning, there was -- you know, with the flash flooding and all that that was going on, there was a lot of speculation that he might have drowned or something like that. And me and my parents and everyone else was pretty adamant against that just because he didn`t really like the water like that. And in the area that it was in, it was just not in a direction that we ever went to. So I`m fairly positive that that didn`t happen. He didn`t go that way.

CASAREZ: What do you think happened? Where did he -- let me ask you, where did he get off the school bus every day in relation to your home?

KLEESCHULTE: Fifty feet, a hundred feet, just right at the top of the hill. And we`re the last house going to the top of the hill. So it was right there, is where he gets off the bus.

CASAREZ: Did police ever tell you that they scanned that area to see if vehicles -- witnesses saw a vehicle at all watching the children get off the bus?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Not to my knowledge. You know, I`ve never heard anything like that and so -- yes, nothing. I never heard of any vehicles or them even thinking maybe there was someone watching the kids getting off the bus or anything along them lines, no bus?

CASAREZ: You know, Richard, you have lived this along with your parents since 1988. What do you think really happened to Scott?

KLEESCHULTE: I think he was taken. I don`t -- I really don`t believe he ever -- not -- no water. I don`t think he made it to the woods even because I was down there, and there was really only one way in and one way out that he would come. And he -- I didn`t see him, and I came out that way before the storm had hit and we never crossed paths. So he never made it to the dirt trails even. So something happened on the road.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: When Scott Kleeschulte disappeared in June of 1988, friends, family and neighbors launched a massive search in the woods behind their St. Charles subdivision. Every clue, every lead from every part of the country has so far turned up nothing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE) is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police have spent the last two decades searching for Scott, looking at every from rivers to man-made caves in a wooded area near Scott`s home, but no sign of the little boy.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: This little boy, 9-year-old Scott Kleeschulte, he was on the junior football team. You see some pictures of him in his football uniform. And he was playing right behind his house. He was right there, and then he was gone. And this is in Missouri. It is about 20 miles from St. Louis County.

And I want to remind everybody, Michael Devlin, one of the modern kidnapping miracles of our time, along with Elizabeth Smart -- Michael Devlin, now serving over 70 life terms, confessed to kidnapping Ben Ownby, who was 13 years old when he was kidnapped in January 2007, and confessed to Shawn Hornbeck, kidnapping him in 2002.

I want to go out to Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst and director of cold case squad, Pine Lake PD, and author of the book "Cold Case: Pathways to Justice" joining us from Atlanta. Late today, Sheryl, we spoke with the attorney for Michael Devlin, who actually confirmed with us that once Michael Devlin was convicted, that a polygraph was administered in regard to Scott, and he passed it, that he said he had nothing to do with the disappearance of little Scott Kleeschulte. Polygraphs, though, don`t always tell the truth.

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: Sometimes, yes. Here`s the deal with this case. There is no way, after Shawn and Ben are recovered, do you not say, We have to look at this guy for Scott -- same age bracket, similar in the way they appear as, you know, little boys. Also, Devlin was in that area. As a 23-year-old guy, he hunted in the woods near Shawn`s (SIC) house. You have to look at that. There`s no way to ignore that.

And again, with the polygraph, I don`t know. Does he have a conscience or not? I don`t know. Has he ever failed one? I don`t know that, either. But I know there`s no way I wouldn`t look at it to see if I could link him to a lot of these missing young boys in that area.

CASAREZ: And Sheryl, let`s couple with that Michael Devlin only had two victims in his entire life?

MCCOLLUM: No way.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every day you think about it, every time the phone rings or something, you think. There`s not a day goes by that you don`t think about it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nine-year-old Scott Allen Kleeschulte had a lot to celebrate. It was the last day of school, and the family planned on going out that night for a fun dinner. After school, Scott arrives home. He changes and heads out to play with friends, but suddenly, a powerful thunderstorm comes down, and Scott never makes it back home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not able to put his picture out yet, it`s just - - that would be too hard to just sit and, you know, have to walk by and see it. All of my stuff is put away of his. I can`t handle that part of it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home. Police immediately began searching the area for any sign of the first grader. Bloodhounds reportedly tracked Scott`s scent from his home to a wooded area nearby, but no sign of the little boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Spread out along there and just take up the hill.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth, and that`s why we still do hold out some hope. We would expect that there would be some article of clothing or some piece of evidence which would indicate that Scott drowned, but to date, nothing has been located.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: After focusing on a series of manmade caves in the wooded area, investigators have run out of leads, but Scott`s family has never given up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other. Down deep, I think there is hope. I mean, you can`t give up. And I just got a gut feeling that something might come out of this.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanished. Families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone, but where? >

Tonight, St. Charles, Missouri, June 1988, the last day of school, nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte looking forward to the summer. Scott, mom, dad, four brothers and sisters plan a big family dinner that night. After school, Scott comes home to change into play clothes then walks over to a friend`s house. His sister sees her little brother standing on the top of the hill just yards away. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte never seen again. Tonight, where is nine-year-old Scott? Straight out to you, Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": It was June 8th, 1988, it was a big day. Scott had just passed from first grade into second grade. He was going to be a big second grader next year, and the whole family had planned a dinner that night because the kids were out of school for the summer. But then, it all changed because Scott was gone.

I want to go out to Pat Brown, criminal profiler, joining us tonight, author of "The Profiler," joining us from Washington, D.C. Pat, somebody knows something, and people talk. People that do things can`t keep it held up inside. They tell others. So, somebody knows something, Pat. The time has come to come forward.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, Jean, I`m not sure I agree with that. It`s surprising how many crimes do get committed, especially homicides, when you especially have a lone psychopath, a serial killer- type. He does what he wants to do. He gets rid of the body. He goes back home and has a hamburger and never does tell anybody. So, often, nobody really does know. But I will say this.

Sometimes, if people can go back, if the police can go back, and we can go back and give very good details like we are tonight, somebody may not know what happened to Scott or not know necessarily that they know the person who did it, but they may remember things about that, you know, say, well, you know, my cousin, Ernie, he was acting strange that night or my cousin Ernie did this and he lived that area, and later on, he got caught for some other kinds of the crimes.

So, they might be able to bring that kind of memory. And I just want to say one other thing. Whenever we have children go outside, we often worry about our girls, you know, our nine-year-old, 10-year-old, 12-year- old girls. We worry about them, but it`s funny, when we think about our boys going out, riding bicycles around and playing at the park, we often don`t think they can become victim of a predator like this, but it does happen. We see it right here.

CASAREZ: That is a good point. To Richard Kleeschulte, joining us tonight who is the brother of Scott, who`s been kind enough to step forward. I know this is difficult. I know it`s tough to rehash this, but Richard, your parents have been through so much since 1988. How are they doing?

RICHARD KLEESCHULTE, BROTHER OF MISSING BOY, SCOTT ALLEN KLEESCHULTE: They`re doing good. Mom`s a rock. She holds us all together. Dad, dad`s had a little bit of health problems here lately in the last few years, but I mean, his brain and his mind is there, and they`re doing good. I mean, talk about it a lot, and never forget him. Never. Every day, I think about him.

CASAREZ: When was the last time police have contacted you? And have they told you what, if anything, they`re doing on this case?

KLEESCHULTE: You know, they contact mom every once in a while. Not for, say, the police department, itself, but the detective that worked the case would constantly get ahold of mom. You know, nothing new has come up for a while, so, you know, not much has been said. Not pretty much since the Devlin stuff. You know, it got pretty hectic around that time, but it`s been pretty calm now for a while.

CASAREZ: We want everybody to look at this picture. Scott Kleeschulte. Nine years old when he disappeared. Look at him. The way he was when he disappeared. Look at the age-progression photograph. To Bethany Marshall, psychoanalyst and author of "Deal Breakers," joining us tonight from Los Angeles. The pain that this family has had to endure as Richard just said, it is life changing. How do they continue to cope while the questions are still there with no answers?

BETHANY MARSHALL, PSYCHOANALYST: Well, it`s difficult because the ambiguity makes you think the worst. At least, if they knew something concrete, like, that he was for sure deceased, then they could begin a normal grieving process. I want to really add to what the panel is saying for a moment. Pat Brown made a very good point about protecting our boys. We know that male pedophiles who offend, who are preferentially attracted to little boys and who are extra familial molesters, meaning they molest outside the family, they are the most prolific sex offenders in our society.

According to some research, they offend over 500 times over the course of their lifetime. Their compulsion is so strong, and the longer they live, of course, the more they offend. The compulsion does not wane over the course of a lifetime. So, of course, Michael Devlin did not just have two victims. Oh, and by the way, they start molesting at the age of 13. That`s the average age that they start picking on smaller children in the community. So, I would look at groups of online pedophiles who share pornography with each other.

I would look -- I would ask the little boys in the community about older men who have been bothering them. I would look at the prison population. We know the sex offenders offend for over ten years, normally, before they`re caught. So, that`s where they`re going to harvest the richest information in terms of trying to figure out what happens.

CASAREZ: Good words, Bethany.

And tonight, please help us find J.J. Willman. He`s 19 years old. He vanished on November 27th, 2010. That`s just a couple months ago. From Woodson Terrace, Missouri. He`s 5`10", 130 pounds with dirty blond hair and blue eyes. There`s a $5,000 reward. If you have any information, please, call 314-427-5858.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On June 8th, 1988, nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte was playing in the neighborhood near his home in St. Charles, Missouri, shortly before a wild thunderstorm had swept the area. Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Scott`s disappearance spurred an immediate investigation, detectives using search dogs and digging equipment to excavate a series of tunnels and caves that had been used for play by neighborhood children.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators including the FBI continue to look for leads, even looking into whether convicted child predator, Michael Devlin, who is serving a life sentence for kidnapping then 12-year-old Shawn Hornbeck and 13-year-old Ben Ownby is connected to the case. Investigators reportedly determine Devlin hunted in the wooded area near Scott`s home around the time of Scott`s disappearance but have found no official link as of yet.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Let`s go out to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation joining us from San Francisco. Marc, what do you think?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I agree with almost everything that`s been said tonight. Pardon me. If it wasn`t Devlin, then it was most likely another predator that took this little boy. I think two things that really hindered the investigation that wouldn`t occur now is the fact that there were no protocols for searching for missing children back in the 1980s.

And Missouri did not have a sex offender registry, so you couldn`t even round up the usual suspects at that time. That having been said, there was a task force convened not long ago to look into the possibility of Devlin being involved in this case as well as many others, and I believe that it was disbanded, and their findings were inconclusive on all counts.

CASAREZ: Right. I think you are right. Let`s go out to the callers. Gale in Virginia. Hi, Gale.

GALE, VIRGINIA: Hi, Miss Jean, how are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

GALE: You`re welcome. I have a question. The man, I can`t think of his name, I`m sorry, Polly Klaas` father. He just answered the question. Back then, they did not have amber alerts. And because you have a son instead of a daughter, you need to keep an eye on your children at this day and time, because I live in a small town of 6,000 people in Virginia.

Within a six-block radius, we have 20 pedophiles and three of them are women, but they do not ever notify anybody that you have one living around you. I get on the computer every night to see who is around me, and you know, that`s the only way. I mean, I thought the laws were when one moved in the neighborhood, they were to tell the neighborhood that one lived there. I mean, what do you do?

CASAREZ: Well, you know, Gail, you make a really good point. And I think what I have learned from doing this series, that I believe in so very much is, it is so easy to go missing. And I don`t care what age you are, but that is the reality. Thanks for calling, Gail. Patricia in New York. Hi, Patricia.

PATRICIA, NEW YORK: Hi there.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

PATRICIA: My question is, have they gone back and re-interviewed the boy`s friends now that they are older?

CASAREZ: That`s a really good question. To Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst. Give us some examples of what law enforcement can do now as far as re-interviewing or going in different directions.

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: Absolutely. You`re going to re- interview the friends. You know, at nine and 10 years old, you may be scared to tell people we went into this cave or into this pipe, you know? So, you know, you re-interview them as grown men, and they maybe tell you, you know, yes, he had this guy that he would meet sometimes, and this guy was going to go hunting over here or he got in the car with this guy to go to the ball field. Absolutely re-interview.

But I`m going to tell you, you stay on Devlin. You stay on him. You talk to any cellmate, you talk to anybody else he may have contact with, because don`t forget, Jean, he was going to kill Shawn Hornbeck, and Shawn talked him out of it. And when does he go get Ben? When Shawn`s too old. He`s out of his, you know, age range of preference. And this guy made porn with Shawn. So, this guy we know is a potential killer. He was going to kill Shawn with his bare hands.

CASAREZ: You`re exactly right. Shawn Hornbeck saved his own life by telling Devlin he would do whatever Devlin wanted at any time so he could live. But Sheryl, what`s the motive for Devlin to come clean right now?

MCCOLLUM: Oh, he doesn`t have to have a motive. We don`t need him to have a motive. We don`t ever need a motive. What we need to do is investigate this like he`s the only viable suspect we have right now because he`s it. And yes, there could be others, but right now, he`s got the most link, the most connection. I mean, he`s in the area. He`s known to do it. I mean, he`s the guy right this minute. He`s the number one guy right this minute.

And if he wants to come forward, it would be just because he wants to do it, but I guarantee you, there`s something either in his cell, there`s something in his past that will show a better linkage here. You know, he had a job one other time at a tool factory, another time at a, you know, funeral home. Did he ever work in that area? Was he working construction owned that apartment complex? Go back and find out.

CASAREZ: He was doing alarm work at the time, and made a call into that county for a job. We do know that. Pat brown, what are your thoughts about this? I mean, the way I look at it, he`s serving 70 years, so why should he give up anymore victims? I mean, goodness of heart on his part?

BROWN: That`s not going to happen. The biggest problem with this is that he got nailed for kidnapping. He`s not going to pipe up and say, by the way, I murdered somebody, too, because that`s obviously worse. And, you know, if it was Devlin, then clearly, this poor child was murdered because he`s not around with him. And here`s another thing that happened, sometimes.

On the way to being able to hold those children, you know, to keep them for years and have that kind of control over them, the earlier crimes may be homicides because they don`t have that ability yet, so they`re grabbing the child and keeping them for a small period of time and then getting rid of them. So, it is very possible Devlin was involved, but he has got absolutely zero incentive to give any information.

CASAREZ: Right. Once again, his attorney has told us that he had nothing to do with the disappearance of Scott Kleeschulte. To Trina in Washington. Hi, Trina.

TRINA, WASHINGTON: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling. What`s your question?

TRINA: Yes. My question is, was there any evidence ever found with Devlin that he was linked to any kind of child pedophilia ring or child porn ring or was he acting alone?

CASAREZ: To Ellie Jostad, Nancy Grace producer, what`s a little bit of the background of Michael Devlin?

ELLIE JOSTAD, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, Michael Devlin, as you explained, he is now serving 74 consecutive life sentences as well as 170 years on federal charges. But he was a guy who worked at a pizza parlor, and as you explained, he kidnapped Shawn Hornbeck as he was out riding his bike. Four years later, kidnapped Ben Ownby, a boy scout, as he was getting off the school bus.

Both of those crimes were in the suburban to where (ph) St. Louis area. That`s why they were looking at him in the Kleeschulte case as well as in the case of Arlon Henderson (ph), both of those boys abducted in very similar circumstances.

CASAREZ: That`s right. And they did find a lot of child porn on his computer, correct, Ellie?

JOSTAD: That`s right.

CASAREZ: And even had, I think, Shawn Hornbeck, as we said, participate in that?

JOSTAD: That`s our understanding.

CASAREZ: Right. So, obviously, had a life-long desire in that area. To Janet in Florida. Hi, Janet.

JANET, FLORIDA: Hi, Jean.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

JANET: Sure. I`m delighted to have the opportunity to tell you I love when you fill in for Nancy.

CASAREZ: Oh, you`re kind. Thank you. Your question?

JANET: Yes. It`s just one nagging question here. It`s very curious to me as to whether Scott went out -- when he went out to play, was he alone, or was he not with any other children?

CASAREZ: Well, that`s an interesting question. I don`t think we`ve gotten to that. To Richard Kleeschulte, the brother of Scott who is joining us tonight. Scott actually wanted to play with a little neighbor, right, Richard? And he went over to his house? Tell us that story.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. After he came home, he changed and probably grabbed him a quick snack and ran across the street to my buddy, Mike`s house, which was my best friend, and, you know, Scott being Scott followed us everywhere. So, he went over there, and Mike was inside eating some ice cream and told him he`d be out in a little bit. And by the time he went out there, you know, never found him or met up with him.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: John Glasgow of Little Rock, Arkansas, did not show up to work one day just over two years ago. Later, his Volvo was found along with his cell phone, laptop, and office key inside.

Samantha Kibalo was an infant when her mother allegedly disappeared with her during a scheduled visitation. Samantha`s father is still searching for the girl who is now 12.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Samantha`s been missing now ten years, and I have not seen or heard or have any connection or contact with her. My wife and I split up two weeks after Samantha was born. She told me that she did not need a man in her life anymore. That`s all she wanted was a baby. Samantha was very lively, energetic, friendly, theatrical.

She loved to put on hats and play dress-up. Jump around. Try to sing and dance. Very outgoing. Very happy child. I would say to Samantha that daddy is alive. Daddy loves you. Every day as I wake up is one day closer to having Samantha back home and in my arms.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Rochelle Battle was last seen in Baltimore, Maryland, wearing a brown hooded sweatshirt, blue jeans, and brown boots.

Just over a year ago, Nataly Aguiar disappeared and may be in the company of her mother. They were last seen in North Carolina.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END

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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Sat Feb 12, 2011 1:56 am

February 10, 2011

Teekah Lewis: Nancy Grace America’s Missing

Posted: 09:03 PM ET


Who can forget the smiling face of beautiful 2-year-old, Teekah Lewis? She was with her family, out for a night of fun, at a bowling alley when she disappeared just 10 feet away from her mother.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Teekah10

Her mother looked away for what she says was just seconds to watch her brother bowl. When she turned back around, her daughter was missing. Immediately, she searched high and low for Teekah who was shy and frightened of strangers. The security guard even made an announcement to everyone at the 32 lane alley to be on the look out, but somehow despite being a packed bowling alley no one saw what happened to the girl. Thirteen years later police say Teekah’s case is a cold case. There are no suspects, and nothing to currently go off of that could lead them to the toddler.

Tipline: 253-591-5959
Reward: $27,000
Missing Since: January 23, 1999
Missing From: Tacoma, WA
Classification: Endangered Missing
Age at Disappearance: 2
Height: 3 feet
Weight: 35 lbs
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Brown
Clothing:
-Tweety bird sweat shirt
-White sweatpants
-No coat



2-Year-Old Toddler Snatched From Bowling Alley

Aired February 11, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to kind her.

GRACE: So many cases --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: -- so few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness had seen the suspect on NANCY GRACE.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive.

Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights.

Let`s don`t give up.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

THERESA LEWIS, TEEKAH`S MOTHER: I believe my daughter is still alive. Until the day I get her back, I`ll never give up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): For 12 years, Theresa Lewis has returned to the place that changed her life forever. It`s the last place the mother of five saw her 2-year-old daughter, Teekah, on January 23rd, 1999. During a family outing to the now defunct New Frontier bowling alley, Teekah vanished without a trace.

LEWIS: It`s been a roller-coaster, nonstop crying.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: While family and friends bowled, the three-foot girl played at the wheel of a video arcade game. When Theresa`s brother got up to bowl, mom says she looked away from her baby girl for less than a minute. And when she looked back, she was gone.

LEWIS: Chills went up and down my spine. It just really blew my spine.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They searched all of the usual places, the bathrooms, up, under, over, and behind any standing item, until finally alerting the security guard at the alley.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She had a Tweety Bird white and green T-shirt on. She had white pants.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police and the FBI immediately began searching for any sign of the tot, using bloodhounds, ATVs, helicopters, questioning sex offenders, and searching all areas around the bowling alley, including a building at a landfill nearby.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want to make sure without a doubt that she didn`t just wander away from the building, that she didn`t wander away and lay down in the brush. We want to make sure she`s not here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The majority of the bowlers at the alley that night have been interviewed, but police have yet to identify the driver of a late 1980s or early 1990s Grand Am with tinted windows. Witnesses say the car was seen speeding out of the parking lot just moments after Teekah disappeared.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s a matter of narrowing the timeline down, and also, again, to rule them out so we can focus and put our energy elsewhere.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The bowling alley is now a fast-food restaurant, but until the toddler, described as a mama`s girl comes home, Lewis will continue to revisit where she lost her daughter.

LEWIS: That`s what I`ve been asking for years, pleading for years, is someone just to come forward.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America. Disappear. Vanish. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we.

Fifty people, 50 days. Fifty nights we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, girl, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents. Gone, but where?

Tonight, 2-year-old toddler Teekah Lewis heads with her family to the local bowling alley. The lanes are packed.

Little Teekah`s having fun playing in a car racing arcade with her family, bowling just feet away. But suddenly she`s gone.

Reports a Pontiac Grand Am with tinted windows speeds away from the bowling alley just minutes later. But police cannot identify the driver. Detectives chase hundreds of leads.

Tonight, 12 years later, a new tip. Are we one step closer to finding a beautiful little girl, 2-year-old Teekah Lewis?

What`s the latest, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, the latest is there`s a $27,000 reward that is still available in this case for anyone that knows the whereabouts of Teekah Lewis. You know, it`s also interesting that her DNA has been put into CODIS now. That is a technological advancement that wasn`t there in 1999.

What this means is that if any remains are found, her DNA can be matched with the DNA of the remains. And that is something that is significant.

I want to go out to David Lohr, crime reporter, AOL.com, joining us tonight.

David, this was right after Christmas in 1999, January 23rd, and it was a night that the whole family went to the bowling alley. And I mean mothers and sisters and aunts and uncles and brothers. And Teekah`s mother just couldn`t find a baby-sitter, so she took her that night.

What happened?

DAVID LOHR, CRIME REPORTER, AOL.COM: Well, Jean, it was actually -- it was a Saturday night, and they were doing this special event at the bowling alley where all the lights were dimmed down. They had the lanes lit up different colors.

So they rented two lanes. They`re taking turns. They`re having a good time.

And the little girl went over to the video arcade. It was less than 10 feet away. She was playing on a race car machine.

So her mom`s watching her. She`s watching what`s going on. When they`re bowling, she turns away just for 15, 30 seconds or so to watch her brother bowl. When she turns her head back around, her daughter`s gone, she`s nowhere to be found.

CASAREZ: Boy, that is scary.

Natisha Lance joining us tonight, NANCY GRACE producer.

Take us inside that bowling alley. We want to give everybody the name of this bowling alley. It was the new Frontier Lanes bowling alley in Tacoma, Washington. Take us inside and explain to us where the arcade was, where the bowling lanes were.

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right. This is the New Frontier bowling alley in Tacoma, Washington, just as you said, Jean. And this bowling alley, there`s 32 lanes that are there. And as David pointed out, the family was on two of those lanes.

Now, you have to step down about two or three steps to go to the bowling area. And above that, there is a counter that`s above there where people can watch the people who are bowling, and then to the back of there, there is this arcade which is kind of in a little nook area behind there. There`s also a bar and a restaurant that`s in there.

But where the arcade was is just about six feet from an exit door of where Teekah was playing. And then we believe that her mother was down in the bowling area, but she could have also been up at the counter area. But she said that she was able to see Teekah when she was looking over at her.

CASAREZ: But the little girl was six feet from an exit door in a dimly-lit bowling alley. All right.

I want to ask you, again, Natisha Lance, there was some unidentified people. Because after this happened, they interviewed everybody at the bowling alley, right?

LANCE: They did. They interviewed everybody who was there that night. And then police went back again later because there was a 10-to-15- minute gap before it was reported to police.

So in that time, police believe that people could have left the bowling alley. But they went back and they looked at different receipts, they looked at the people who had rented the lanes, and they were able to interview most of the people there.

However, witnesses say that there were two unidentified men who were there who police had yet to make contact with. One of these men, according to a witness, was seen following Teekah around when she was walking toward this exit door and also walking in the arcade area.

And there was also this vehicle that was spotted outside, according to a witness. It was speeding away around the same time that Teekah disappeared. It`s a 1980s or 1990s model Grand Am, maroon in color, with dark tinted windows and a spoiler on the back.

CASAREZ: Look at that little girl. She is precious.

And joining us tonight from the state of Washington is her mother, Theresa Lewis, Teekah Lewis` mother.

Oh, she`s gorgeous.

Thank you so much, Theresa, for joining us.

Now, I know you feel very, very strongly that Teekah is alive.

LEWIS: Yes, I do.

CASAREZ: Can you tell us why?

LEWIS: I mean, she was only two-and-a-half years old. She -- I mean, look at her. Look at -- I mean, those big brown eyes, those dimples. Who wouldn`t want her? You know?

I mean, my baby`s out there somewhere. And in my heart I believe she`s in Florida.

CASAREZ: You know, we`re showing everybody age progression photos of Teekah Lewis right now. Look at them very, very closely.

Ms. Lewis, I want to ask you, that night, take us back to that night, if you can, to the bowling alley. Your daughter was playing an arcade game, right, where she`s holding the steering wheel?

What happened?

LEWIS: Yes. She was playing the racing game, you know -- well, she was trying to. You know, her little feet couldn`t reach the pedals. So she was just acting like she was playing.

We all were keeping eyes on her. You know? There wasn`t not a minute that somebody didn`t keep their eyes on her.

And it just -- I looked away for just not even 30 to a minute and she was gone. Just like that. And it`s hard for me to believe that not one person in that bowling alley had seen nothing.

CASAREZ: You`re right. You are so right.

So what happened? When you realized she was gone, you had so many relatives there that night. What did you do first?

LEWIS: I -- me, I stopped. I stopped everything I was doing and I looked at the video games, in between the video games, in the bathroom.

I went all -- I ran all the way down to the other bathroom and I asked my ex-sister-in-law`s sister if, you know, she had seen Teekah. She was like, "Teekah`s not in here."

And I had told her, "She`s gone. She`s nowhere around."

So I went to the off-duty officer and I told him, "My daughter is gone." He was like, "What do you mean?" I was like, "She`s nowhere around."

And he -- on the intercom he said, "Look for a missing girl." I was like, "She`s not in here. I already did that. Please call the police, do what you can. Find my daughter."

And after he did the intercom, they called in the first officer. It took, like, 20 minutes for the first officer to come. And within that 20 minutes, my daughter was gone.

CASAREZ: I cannot imagine.

The side door, did you go out that side door? Did you go outside? What did you see outside?

LEWIS: I went out the side door. I was screaming for Teekah, because I knew if I was screaming for her and she heard my voice, she would run back, if she walked out on her own. But I know she didn`t walk out on her own. She couldn`t even open up that door. The door was too heavy for my little girl to open up that door.

CASAREZ: How dark was it in there that night?

LEWIS: It was dark. You know, if the person that did this knew what they were doing, they could have got away, but Teekah was the one to scream at any stranger. She was a mama`s girl.

She would only come to mama, her sisters, and her baby-sitter, and her cousin, Sarah (ph). She wouldn`t go to nobody else. So I don`t understand how this person got away with my daughter.

CASAREZ: I understand what you`re saying, because she didn`t scream out. You didn`t hear a word. She voluntarily may have gone out of that bowling alley with somebody she knew?

LEWIS: Yes.

CASAREZ: All right.

To tonight`s case alert.

Today marks the two-year disappearance of Florida girl Haleigh Cummings. The 5-year-old reportedly tucked into bed. Then a few hours later she was gone.

Police say her stepmother, Misty Croslin, well, was the last person to see her alive. Croslin, flunking several polygraphs, now behind bars, along with Haleigh`s father and multiple relatives on drug trafficking charges.

As the search for Haleigh goes on, investigators insist Haleigh`s disappearance is not the work of a stranger and key witnesses in the case are hiding critical information.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

LEWIS: That`s what I`ve been asking for years, pleading for years, is someone just to come forward.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Two-year-old toddler Teekah Lewis played at a coin-operated video game while her family bowled nearby. Teekah vanished minutes later, January 23, 1999. Investigators say they believe the toddler was kidnapped by a stranger, but say it`s hard to believe nobody saw what happened.

LEWIS: It`s been a roller-coaster, nonstop crying.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police and the FBI immediately began searching for any sign of the tot using bloodhounds, ATVs, helicopters.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you find anything at all that you think is of interest, don`t pick it up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Just a desire to help people out. Just want to come out and do what we can to help find the little girl.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

What a beauty. This little girl, Teekah Lewis, two-and-a-half years old. The whole family goes to the bowling alley on a Saturday night. How many relatives could you have at the bowling alley? And she just disappears out of thin air.

We are taking your calls live. Teekah Lewis` mother, Theresa, is joining us tonight with calls.

Christina in Indiana.

Hi Christina.

CHRISTINA, INDIANA: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

CHRISTINA: Thank you.

I have a question. I know that her DNA has been put into CODIS. But why is it not possible for us to have a worldwide DNA system somewhere?

I mean, at some point in our children`s lives, they go to the doctor or the hospital and they get blood work done. And if she`s still alive and with another family, if they could run it through that, I mean, I`d be willing to have my children to have their information put in that to save another child`s life.

CASAREZ: Christina, that`s really, really a smart thing you`re saying. I don`t think technology has gone that far. The system is bogged down.

But Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler," joining us tonight from Washington, D.C., what about that? Because Theresa, Teekah`s mother, believes -- and she has got her reasons -- she believes her daughter is still alive. How can we link or somehow identify these children that may be in the hands of someone else?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, it`s very, very hard to do, because you have to get DNA off that child and get it matched up with CODIS. And there`s no law that requires that.

But I think what the police can do is go back to that bar. I believe this person wasn`t local, because that`s where a lot -- bowling alleys are local people. They`re not people on the road or from far away.

And I also believe it`s somebody who was probably one of the bar people, coming and going quite often. Probably, people know who he is but don`t suspect he`s particularly guilty of anything because that`s Roger or that Bobby. You know, they know who he is, even if they don`t like him to much, but he`s always around.

And it isn`t that hard to grab a child at a very, very busy place, because all you have to do is have that moment. If he sees that little girl, and he`s over in that corner, and he can get her out of eyeshot for a second, put a hand over her mouth, and he`s out the door.

And do you know if somebody actually saw him even with his hand on the child, he`d probably say, "Oh, your little girl was running toward the door. Here, I was trying to keep her from going outside." And we would never think anything of it.

So I bet you he`s a regular at that bowling alley. They need to go back and find out who drinks at that bar back then.

CASAREZ: Those are some good points.

To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation, joining us in San Francisco.

You know, as I was thinking about it, a bowling alley is actually a really noisy place. It`s a hollow-sounding place, acoustics are not good. But very noisy. And even if a child did scream, you could put your hand over the mouth and they might think the child is just playing or, you know, whatever.

Authorities have told us, Marc Klaas, that they do believe it`s a stranger abduction. That`s what they believe, law enforcement, at this point.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: I agree with them. But first, briefly, to the DNA question, first of all, I think the argument against it would be that it`s intrusive, and a lot of people don`t want big brother on their backs like that. But DNA could easily be extracted in the maternity ward for every child born and placed into a database.

Now, as far as the abduction situation goes, I agree, it probably was a crime of opportunity, and it may very well come back to those two men that were there and then weren`t there. One of them could easily have gone outside, got in the car. The other guy could have put himself between the child and the family, scooped her up, and immediately taken her outside, gotten into the car, and disappeared.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): A mother searching for her daughter for more than 12 years thought a tip might finally answer her question, what happened to her two-and-a-half-year-old daughter, Teekah Lewis?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On January 23, 1999, around 10:30 p.m., Teekah`s family reported the tot missing when there was no sign of her. The family says Teekah was playing near the video games when she was last seen by her parents. Teekah`s mother says she turned her head for last than a minute and Teekah was gone.

LEWIS: I believe my daughter is still alive, and I`ll never give up hope. And, you know, until the day I get her back, I`ll never give up hope.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez.

Look at the picture of this little girl. Her mother is with us tonight. She believes she is still alive. That is what she feels in her gut, in her heart. And she has the facts, she says, to back it up.

I want to go to Cecilia in Kentucky.

Hi, Cecilia.

CECILIA, KENTUCKY: Hi. I was just saying, you know, I`m sorry about her loss and everything, and hope and pray that she is alive. But if you turn your head more than 15 seconds, it had to be longer for someone to snatch up a little girl.

CASAREZ: You know, that is the stark --

CECILIA: Did they have cameras?

CASAREZ: -- reality. Did they have cameras?

Theresa Lewis joining us tonight, Teekah Lewis` mother.

It was 1999. Did they have any surveillance cameras in the bowling alley?

LEWIS: They did, but that night they didn`t have them on.

CASAREZ: You know, every year you hold a vigil for your daughter at the site where the New Frontier Lanes bowling alley was, right?

LEWIS: Yes, I do.

CASAREZ: It was torn down shortly after that. What`s in its place? Because I want everybody to know where this is. It`s a fast-food place there now?

LEWIS: There`s a Home Depot, and there`s a Jack in the Box, and there`s a bank there.

CASAREZ: All right. Tacoma, Washington.

To Steve Kardian, joining us tonight, former police detective, self- defense expert out of New York.

This is a cold case, and law enforcement told us that they`re not really working it because it`s a cold case. What do you do, Steve, when you have got a cold case, but you have got so many other cases to focus on, but you can`t forget this because Teekah Lewis might be out there?

STEVE KARDIAN, FMR. POLICE DETECTIVE : Well, Jean, when they have time, if they have a cold case squad, they`ll be able to pick it up. Typically, what we see in law enforcement when we have a quiet period, we`ll pick up an old case, we`ll take a look and see if there`s anything new. We may even go out and interview some witnesses.

But they`ll stay on it. They have got the ViCAP unit, the Violent Criminal Apprehension unit of the FBI that`s going to keep a vigilant look for the DNA for her, and we`re good.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LEWIS: That`s what I`ve been asking for years, pleading for years, is someone just to come forward. You know? But don`t play no game.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

THERESA LEWIS, MOTHER OF MISSING GIRL, TEEKAH LEWIS: I believe my daughter`s still alive. Until the day I get her back, I`ll never give up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: For 12 years, Theresa Lewis has returned to the place that changed her life forever. It`s the last place the mother of five saw her two-year-old daughter, Teekah, on January 23rd, 1999. During a family outing to the now debunk new frontier bowling ally, Teekah vanished without a trace.

LEWIS: It`s been a roller coaster. Nonstop crying.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: While family and friends bowled, the 3-foot girl played at the wheel of a video arcade game. When Theresa`s brother got up to bowl, mom says she looked away from her baby girl for less than a minute and when she looked back, she was gone.

LEWIS: Chills just went down my spine. Just really blew my mind.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They searched all of the usual place, the bathrooms, up, under, over and behind any standing item until, finally, alerting the security guard at the alley.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She had a Tweety bird, white and green T-shirt on. She had white pants.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police and the FBI immediately began searching for any sign of the tot, using bloodhounds, ATVs, helicopters, questioning sex offenders and searching all areas around the bowling alley including a building at a landfill nearby.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want to make sure without a doubt that she didn`t just wander away from the building, that she didn`t wander away and then lay down in the brush. We want to make sure she`s not here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The majority of the bowlers at the alley that night have been interviewed, but police have yet to identify the driver of a late 1980s or early 1990s Grand Am with tinted windows. Witnesses say the car was seen speeding out of the parking lot just moments after Teekah disappeared.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s a matter of narrowing the timeline down, and also, again, to rule them out, so we can focus and put our energy elsewhere.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The bowling alley is now a fast-food restaurant, but until the toddler described as a mama`s girl comes home, Lewis will continue to revisit where she lost her daughter.

LEWIS: That`s what I`ve been asking for years, pleading for years is someone just to come forward.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, girls, boys, mothers, fathers, grandparents, gone, but where?

Tonight, two-year-old toddler, Teekah Lewis, heads with her family to the local bowling alley. The lanes are packed. Little Teekah`s having fun, playing at a car racing arcade with her family bowling just feet away, but suddenly, she`s gone. Reports, a Pontiac Grand Am with tinted windows speeds away from the bowling alley just minutes later, but police cannot identify the driver. Detectives chase hundreds of leads.

Tonight, 12 years later, a new tip. Are we one step closer to finding a beautiful little girl, two-year-old Teekah Lewis? What`s the latest, Jean?

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": You know, Nancy, we spoke with police tonight, and here is what they`re telling us. That if anybody out there at the time this little girl disappeared, January 23rd, 1999, had someone that talked about the case a lot, seemed to be very interested in the case, seemed to have an obsession with it, call authorities. This is the time. Anybody that knows anything of that nature.

I want to go out to David Lohr, joining us tonight, AOL.com. He is their crime reporter. David, this did happen in January, 1999. What time was it at the bowling alley that night in Tacoma, Washington, and how many people were there that night?

DAVID LOHR, REPORTER, AOL NEWS: Well, it`s about 10:30 at night, and they estimate there was upwards of 200 people present at the bowling alley when little girl went missing. Now, you know, law enforcement was there within about 20 minutes of being called, and they launched what by today`s standards was a pretty large search. I mean, they had 200 people out there. They had ATVs, helicopters, everything out there looking for this little girl, but they couldn`t find any sign of her.

At one point, they had some bloodhounds that had led them to an area a couple blocks away. It was overgrown. They couldn`t look at it at that time, but when they came back a week later, they did make somewhat of an interesting find. They found some Docker-style pants, a plaid shirt and a pea coat, kind of like what a pilot would wear, but whether or not those are related, we don`t know at this point, but it certainly could have been an attempt by somebody to disguise themselves and then ditch the items there.

CASAREZ: And that was very odd, David, because a cadaver dog actually took authorities to that field, but yet, they found nothing. I want to go tonight to Theresa Lewis, Teekah`s mother, who is joining us from the state of Washington. I can`t imagine the chaos that you went through and your family went through at that bowling alley that night. I`ve got to ask you this question. You believe your daughter is alive? You say you know that.

LEWIS: Yes, I do.

CASAREZ: How do you know that?

LEWIS: In my heart, she`s still alive. I`ll never give up on Teekah. You know, she was 2 years old, and she was a mama`s girl. And I don`t understand how they got away with her. But deep side in my heart, she`s still alive.

CASAREZ: Miss Lewis, do you know who has her?

LEWIS: I believe so.

CASAREZ: Have you told authorities?

LEWIS: I`ve told them over the 12 years.

CASAREZ: Have they investigated in that area?

LEWIS: They have. They`ve given him a polygraph. You know, he failed one, passed the other, but you know, they say they`ve interviewed his family, and they interviewed him, but, I mean, it all -- all the things that had happened prior to Teekah`s disappearance, I believe she`s in Florida.

CASAREZ: You know, Theresa, you know what they say about a mother`s instinct. I want to go to Michelle in Nevada. Hi, Michelle.

MICHELLE, NEVADA: Hi, how are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

MICHELLE: My question is for the mother. I mean, I`m genuinely sorry for, you know, the loss of her daughter, and I pray that she is alive. But my question is, if she feels she`s in Florida, why hasn`t she went to Florida ?

CASAREZ: OK. Theresa Lewis, why haven`t you gone to Florida?

LEWIS: If I had the authority and if I had the money, I`d go there. I`d be on the first plane out 12 years ago. But I don`t have the money to do it, and I can`t just go up there because I don`t have the authority to go knock on somebody`s door and say, is my daughter here? I don`t know who -- I know who these people are, but I don`t know them.

CASAREZ: You know, I guess a lot of people, and I understand, money is tough to get, I understand that, but I guess a lot of people would save that money, penny by penny, to go. Do you think you`re scared to go?

LEWIS: Yes, I`m scared. You know, I mean, it`s been 12 years. They took 12 years of my life. They took 12 years of my daughter`s life. I have an empty spot in my heart. You know, I can`t get that back until I get Teekah. And yes, I do want to go to Florida, but, yes, I`m scared because they might have my daughter, and I`m scared to what I`d do if I did find my daughter with this person.

CASAREZ: Tonight, everybody, please help us find Janice Pocket, seven years old, vanishes July 26th, 1973 from Tolland, Connecticut. She`s a white female, four feet tall, 65 pounds with blond hair and blue eyes. If you have information, please call 860-685-8000.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Tonight, two-year-old toddler, Teekah Lewis, heads with her family to the local bowling alley. The lanes were packed. Little Teekah`s having fun, playing at a car racing arcade with her family bowling just feet away, but suddenly, she`s gone. Reports, a Pontiac Grand Am with tinted windows speeds away from the bowling alley just minutes later, but police cannot identify the driver. Detectives chase hundreds of leads.

Tonight, 12 years later, a new tip. Are we one step closer to finding a beautiful little girl, two-year-old Teekah Lewis?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Four dozen volunteers stand shoulder to shoulder.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The other two teams are ready.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Searching for clues into the disappearance of two- year-old Teekah Lewis.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s just the desire to help people out. Just want to come out and do what we can to help find the little girl.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She had a Tweety bird white and green t-shirt on. She had white pants.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Teekah Lewis was last seen here at a nearby bowling alley. Officers wanted to make absolutely sure that she didn`t wander off by herself.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Why is that important? Because we want to make sure without a doubt that she didn`t just wander away from the building, that she didn`t wander away and then lay down in the brush. We want to make sure she`s not here.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tacoma police even bring in Tunk, one of the best search dogs in the area.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He`s just been really thorough in checking the ground and actually working quite fast today. So, that`s good, because we`ve got a lot of area to cover.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: In the end, searchers come up empty handed, but the search leaves authorities with only one possible conclusion, that Teekah Lewis is the victim of foul play.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. I want to go out to Lillian Glass, psychologist, joining us from Los Angeles. I want to delve into this a little bit because Theresa Lewis believes her daughter is alive, believes precious Teekah is alive in Florida. She tells me that she hasn`t gone in 11 years because she doesn`t have the money. I think that`s an excuse, but I don`t think she doesn`t want her daughter. There`s some other reason, Lillian.

LILLIAN GLASS, PH.D., PSYCHOLOGIST: Right. There`s something that concerns me that she just revealed on this show. And I`m all for a mother`s instinct. I really believe that, that when a mother feels something, you have to listen to that, but one thing that very much concerns me that she`s letting money stop her, and there`s no reason for her not to go to Florida, to somehow put the pennies together as you said, go to Florida and get authorities to help her get her daughter back.

CASAREZ: Well, Joey Jackson, defense attorney, joining us from New York, maybe she`s really scared. Scared for her own safety.

JOEY JACKSON, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: You know what, she certainly could be, Jean, and I would just say to her, you know, just talking as an optimist here, you remember the Carlina White case just a few weeks ago here in New York.

CASAREZ: Got chills.

JACKSON: After 23 years, isn`t that right? It was amazing, Jean. After 23 years, there was a reunification of the daughter with the parents. It was incredible, and certainly, I would hope that there wouldn`t be another 12 years that would go by here for that to be that reunification. But, you know what, hope springs eternal. She believes the girl`s alive. Obviously, if she could go to Florida, get there, if she can, I just hope and I pray that there`d be some closure here and that she gets to see this precious little girl again.

CASAREZ: All right. To Steve Kardian, former police detective joining us tonight from New York. What can she do? If police are saying, we know there`s a lead, this is a cold case, we`ll get to it at some point. What can she do on her own, especially someone that is of meager means?

STEVE KARDIAN, FMR. POLICE DETECTIVE: Well, she can hire a private investigator to look further into her premonition that her daughter is still alive, and then, take that information to law enforcement and convince them that this investigation is not a cold case. And that there is a possibility that the child is in Florida.

CASAREZ: All right. So, fight herself, get that information, anything she can get and take it to law enforcement. Theresa Lewis, I want to give you one of the last words tonight. What do you want to say to anyone out there that may know anything?

LEWIS: I just want my daughter home. That`s it. You know, I know somebody out there knows what happened to my child. You know, it`s only going to take that one person to bring her home and that`s all we need. All I want is my daughter to come home.

CASAREZ: All right. Ivonne in Texas. Hi, Ivonne.

IVONNE, TEXAS: Hi. I was wondering about the car. Does she know anything about the car? And why does she know so much where her daughter is at? And the two guys that seen with the girl, why didn`t nobody notice anything?

CASAREZ: OK. Natisha Lance, what was the car that some said was fleeing out of the parking lot that night?

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: It was a maroon in color Grand Am, either late model 1980s or early 1990s model. And I do have to say, Jean, that police did extensively research this vehicle. They didn`t find any connection to Teekah`s case. However, I did ask Teekah`s mother when I spoke to hear earlier if she knew anybody who had this type of vehicle, and she also said no.

CASAREZ: OK. Pat Brown, criminal profiler, joining us out of Washington, D.C. You started this show by thinking about people maybe behind the bar that worked there, going in and out, and then, we find out the video surveillance system wasn`t working that night in the bowling alley, Pat.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, that`s unfortunate. Obviously, they should always be working, but I`m really confused about how Teekah`s mother says she knows where this child is, but she wants somebody else to give information to police saying where the child is to bring her home. If she already knows it, we don`t need anybody else`s help.

The only thing I can think of is maybe, maybe she just wishes the child were alive down there, and the reason she doesn`t want to go down there is because she really doesn`t believe the child is alive down there. And that`s just one way to keep hope going, but if she knows where that child is, then obviously, somebody can go get that child.

CASAREZ: That`s right. And hope springs eternal, right? Carlina White is a prime example. A mother`s gut instinct. You go for it.

Tonight, "CNN Heroes."

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ANNE HALLUM, DEFENDING THE PLANET: In Guatemala, it`s typical tragically to have hundreds of mudslides. The rains come in downpours. The mountainside will simply give way and collapse. Houses are washed away, and people have been killed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (translator): All three die here. They were like my children. The rains came. The mud took them away.

HALLUM: They just live with it and make the best of it, but I say, here are some things you can do.

I`m Anne Motley Hallum. I`m helping the people in rural Guatemala protect their families and their fields from the dangers of mudslides. Pine trees with tap roots hold a mountain together, but the trees are cut for firewood and to make room for the crops. And without realizing it, they`ve taken away their protection.

Gracias. Gracias.

We started to teach the villagers how to use the trees. We`ll start with little seed bed, and we`ll build that, and then, we transplant those seedlings on to the mountain slopes. We watch the trees grow. That`s why we stay for five years. I noticed that the mudslides aren`t happening here, and we say, all right, you`ve got it. You know how to do this now.

I can go back to areas that we`re nothing but mudslides and soil erosion. And now, I see forest and they`re still there, and they`re beautiful.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, a sister, a brother, a father, a mother, disappears. Families left behind waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Fred Moseley is my brother, and he was born when I was 14 years old. So, he was my little kid brother. As a teenager, always enjoyed taking care of him, and we even went camping once or twice. We were living in a little town of Canyon, Texas, outside of Amarillo. Fred seemed to always be smiling. He was bubbly and excited and enthusiastic about things.

Also went to church every Sunday. He went -- he was in scouts. He disappeared in July of 1998. He was 17 at this time. There were signs that somebody had visited the house. To the best of my knowledge, they never really got any good leads at all.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`m the father of Sharon Naomi Baldeagle missing since 1984. We just happened to see them walking, offered them a meal at his house, and took them down there and fed them, and they thought it was a generous gesture, which it was, but it didn`t turn out that way. It was a total stranger.

The girl that got away, the older girl, actually, that talked her into running away from school, she got out, she broke loose and got, went to the police. And ten minutes, later the police got to that house there in the suburb of Casper, Wyoming, and they were gone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Kristin spires. I`m her mom, Lynn. We`ve been missing Kris since May 14th, 2010. We`re just trying to find her. They`re following every lead that comes in. She went to a party in Big Rapids, and she never returned home. She took her purse, cell phone, and that was it. This isn`t like Kris to just leave like this. Our family is a loving family.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END



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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:55 pm

Stephanie Low: Nancy Grace America’s Missing

Posted: 04:16 PM ET


Four months later, what happened to the 22-year-old Wausau woman remains a mystery.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Low-bl10

She had been out with others earlier that night, but when her friends went to her apartment looking for her later, she was gone. She left her two dogs alone without food or water, which friends and relatives say would be very much out of character for her. Family members have said Low received threats before she went missing, and police say they have reason to believe she was taken against her will. Low’s family has searched local rivers and parks for any sign of her and the state crime lab has analyzed evidence taken from her apartment, but with investigators running out of leads, her parents recently appealed to the public for help, offering a $3,000 reward for information that leads to her whereabouts.

Tipline: 715-261-7800
Reward: $3,000
Age: 22
Vanished: October 10, 2010
From: Wausau, Wisconsin
Height: 5’2”
Weight: 135 lbs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Blue
Characteristics:
-Tattoo on lower back
-Scar on left wrist, right arm, abdomen & left arm
-Pierced left nostril & abdomen



Stephanie Low Missing After Abrupt End to Phone Call

Aired February 14, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on the NANCY GRACE show.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: All I know is she was afraid, that somebody was threatening her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The victim of recent threats, 22-year-old Stephanie Low was afraid, so afraid she calls her brother extremely worried, wanting him to come over to the house. But Stephanie`s brother instructs her to get into a cab and come over to his place to spend the night. Stephanie never heard from again.

GEORGE LOW, FATHER: I do not know what happened to my daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`m scared. I mean, I`m most definitely scared.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My worst fear is that we ain`t going to never find her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That`s probably what I think about the most.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stephanie was on the phone firming up plans with her brother`s girlfriend. But she hangs up. They call back and can`t reach Stephanie.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s just the way the call ended. It was -- she got frantic.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stephanie`s loved ones head over to the house to check on her later that day. From the outside, everything seems fine. But inside the home, there`s no sign of Stephanie.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There were some things that we found in the apartment that were unusual, that could have -- could lead us to believe there, you know, possibly has been some harm done to her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Cops say they have reason to believe the 22-year- old taken against her will. Stephanie`s family and friends won`t give up until they can bring Stephanie home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want to find her as fast as we can because we know the chances of her being OK are better the sooner we can find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Don`t be afraid. I know a lot`s going on and you`re probably overwhelmed. Don`t be. Just call. Everyone wants you just to come home.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish, their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we -- 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone. But where?

Tonight, live, Wisconsin. Twenty-two-year-old beauty Stephanie Low calls her brother on a Saturday night, asking him to stay at her house, says she`s afraid after getting a series of threats. Stephanie`s brother and his girlfriend tell her they`re low on gas and take a taxi over to their place. But suddenly, mid-conversation, Stephanie hangs up. A call back goes straight to voicemail.

Friends head to her house. Everything looks normal, the front door locked. But once inside, no Stephanie, blood on the bed, the sheets gone, cell phone, keys, missing, purse and wallet left behind. Police say evidence proves Stephanie was taken against her will. Tonight, who took 22-year-old Stephanie Low?

Straight out to Jean Casarez. Jean, exactly what evidence points to a struggle or kidnap?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Well, a struggle or kidnap is because of what was found in the home. Here is what we have learned from police. Inside that home, the sheets were stripped off the mattress. There weren`t any pillows. There was nothing. There was blood and there was one slipper. But police are saying not that much blood that they can`t say that Stephanie Low is still alive.

Let`s go out to right now Pam Warnke. She is an anchor/reporter with WAOW television in Wausau, Wisconsin. Pam, I want you to go through the timeline with us because the last time that she was seen alive -- I`m saying alive -- was Saturday night, October 9th, right, at a tavern with friends?

PAM WARNKE, WAOW-TV (VIA TELEPHONE): That`s right, Jean. She was apparently at a bar not very far from her house, just a few blocks. And sometime a few hours later, she reportedly made that call to her brother and her brother`s girlfriend. She sounded frantic, saying she feared for her life, she did not want to be alone. Her parents tell us that phone call suddenly ended, and after failed attempts to reach her, they drove to the house. She was not there, just her two dogs were there, dogs that they say she wouldn`t have neglected, she wouldn`t have left alone. So they knew there was something wrong. And she hasn`t been heard from since.

CASAREZ: All right, Alexis Weed, "NANCY GRACE" producer, joining us from New York, let`s really look at this timeline. The first call comes in to her brother through her sister-in-law-to-be around 8:00 o`clock in the evening, correct?

ALEXIS WEED, "NANCY GRACE" PRODUCER: ... early morning hours on October 10th that she then makes that second call to the brother`s girlfriend. That`s when she says, I feel threatened, I don`t want to be home alone, please send my brother to come stay with me at my apartment tonight.

CASAREZ: OK, so she feels threatened. It`s 12:38. Where do we think that call is made from?

WEED: Jean, we believe the call was made from her home, although police are not 100 percent certain. They said that they had a little bit of trouble triangulating the location of her phone because it was off for a long period of time after these calls, and during the time when she was making many, many calls, Jean. She made as many as 40 calls within the hour that she was last heard from.

CASAREZ: Do we have any idea who those 40 calls were made to? Those are a lot of call, almost one a minute.

WEED: A lot of calls, and we understand she made hundreds of calls within that last week that she was seen alive. And we don`t know, though, who these calls were made to, other than we know that she called the brother`s girlfriend and she called the brother that night. Police have not let us know the rest of those calls, who they were to and from.

CASAREZ: All right. So Stephanie Low goes to a tavern with friends. The friends drop her off at home. She makes a phone call to her brother to say, Look, I`m scared, I don`t want to be alone tonight. And that`s the last that she was ever heard from.

We`ve got very special guests tonight. First of all, Cynthia Low (SIC). She is the mother of Stephanie Low, joining us tonight from Green Bay, Wisconsin. And Shelley Resch, Stephanie Low`s best friend and her future sister-in-law. Thank you very much for joining us.

This is only four months old. Claudia, you lost your daughter, gone missing only four months ago. How did you find out that she was gone?

BLAKE: I got a phone call on Sunday morning from Shelley saying something was wrong because she hadn`t been able to reach Stephanie. And she told me what had occurred earlier in the morning. And I immediately continued -- tried to call her and sent people over to the house early that day. And the doors were locked, and nobody answered. It was later that day that Shelley and the friend, Alyssa (ph), got into the house...

CASAREZ: All right, Shelley...

BLAKE: ... and found that she was missing.

CASAREZ: They broke in the house. Shelley, joining us from Green Bay, Wisconsin, you were the closest friend to Stephanie Low. You spoke with her that night. Am I correct?

SHELLEY RESCH, FRIEND AND SISTER-IN-LAW: Correct.

CASAREZ: What was her voice -- what was her...

(CROSSTALK)

RESCH: ... that morning.

CASAREZ: Right, the last known person to have spoken with her. What was her voice like? What does your gut tell you now as you think about that call four months ago?

RESCH: She sounded mad, really agitated. She wasn`t -- she wasn`t her normal happy self but -- and she sounded really agitated when I talked to her on the phone because -- go ahead.

CASAREZ: No, go ahead.

RESCH: She just -- I knew she was angry because of the way I was trying to explain things to her -- just, you know, Hold on, we can get you a cab, you can come stay here. She wouldn`t let me even get that out before she had hung up the phone. So she was -- she was angry with me that I was unable to get Dan, her brother, to her house to stay with her overnight.

CASAREZ: OK. Joining us tonight, also from Wausau, Wisconsin, is Greg Hagenbucher. He is the captain, the detective from the Wausau Police Department who is actively investigating this case. Detective, thank you very much for joining us. Inside that apartment, what did law enforcement find?

GREG HAGENBUCHER, WAUSAU POLICE DEPARTMENT (via telephone): When law enforcement was called to the apartment because of what the family members thought was suspicious, patrol officers found some blood then the sheets missing off the bed, pillows missing from the bed and thought it was suspicious enough to call in detectives. Detectives then responded and saw the same thing, called in supervisors. And that started the investigation on that Sunday, October 10th.

CASAREZ: Detective, where exactly was the blood found?

HAGENBUCHER: There was blood found on the bed, on a nightstand next to the bed, and on the floor.

CASAREZ: OK. And one of her bedroom slippers was there and one was not?

HAGENBUCHER: That`s correct. There was one bedroom slipper found at the apartment, and according to family members, mother had bought those for her, and one could not be located at the apartment.

CASAREZ: As far as phone calls, the phone call that we`ve been focusing in on is 12:38, when she called her family saying, I don`t want to be alone, can you come and pick me up so I can stay with you, can you come here and stay with me? Did she make any other phone calls after that 12:38 AM call on October 10th?

HAGENBUCHER: No, that was her last telephone call outgoing.

CASAREZ: OK. Detective, how far away is the tavern she was at with her three friends?

HAGENBUCHER: Four or five blocks from her apartment.

CASAREZ: Four or five blocks. And they brought her home, correct?

HAGENBUCHER: One of the friends brought her home and then returned to the tavern.

CASAREZ: Now, do you have video surveillance of her leaving the tavern?

HAGENBUCHER: Yes, we do.

CASAREZ: What time was that?

HAGENBUCHER: About 12:15 AM on October 10th.

CASAREZ: So 12:15, 12:48 -- do I have that time right -- is the last phone call. Is there is a very short window there, am I correct, Detective?

HAGENBUCHER: Yes. Well, that`s the last outgoing call. There, you know, could have been other calls after that that were made to her phone, which we did have. But that was her last outgoing call. So that`s the time we know she last used her telephone to make a call or dial a call.

CASAREZ: We are taking your calls live tonight. Detective, was there any sign of forced entry into the home at all?

HAGENBUCHER: No, ma`am.

CASAREZ: So do you believe this is someone that she knew or someone that knew of her?

HAGENBUCHER: Well, if she normally kept her doors locked, it had to be someone she knew or somebody she maybe was expecting because it doesn`t appear there`s any sign of forced entry into that apartment.

CASAREZ: And Detective, do you believe that she could still be alive today, four months later?

HAGENBUCHER: Yes, I do.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: With me is Daniel Blake. This is Stephanie`s brother. Daniel, what more can you tell us? That`s quite a convoluted story. She was getting threats, and now she`s gone?

DANIEL BLAKE, STEPHANIE`S BROTHER: That`s all we know. We don`t know much. I know we get together every day and we search for her. We don`t know. We know there was threats.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Twenty-two-year-old Stephanie Low is missing, and police have reason to believe she could be in danger.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want to find her as fast as we can.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The last time Stephanie`s family heard from her was early Sunday morning.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: She was afraid. Somebody was threatening her. She didn`t want to be alone.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her father says she indicated someone was threatening her. Then the call just abruptly ended.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: At this point, we are keeping all options open as to where she may be.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: ... lived with her boyfriend in Wausau. He was arrested Thursday for violating his probation.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Police went to Low`s apartment. They say they found suspicious evidence that they sent to the crime lab.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There were some things that we found in the apartment that were unusual, to lead us to believe there, you know, possibly has been some harm done to her.

LOW: We do not know what happened to my daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Don`t be afraid. I know a lot`s going on and you`re probably overwhelmed. Don`t be. Just call.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. This is a very active case. It`s only four months ago that Stephanie Low went missing. Police say they are pursuing this extremely aggressively. They believe she could be alive. Now, 22-year-old Stephanie Low -- everybody take a look at her. This was her first apartment. She had just gotten her own apartment. She wanted to be a day care worker. That was what she wanted to do. She is 5 feet, 2 inches tall, 135 pounds, brown hair and blue eyes. She`ll look pretty similar to what she looks like on that screen.

We are taking your calls live. Out to Connie in South Carolina. Hi, Connie.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. How`re you doing?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Great. It is just fascinating to me the crimes that are going on. And I`m curious about the boyfriend in this situation. She had to know who come to her door if there was no forced entry.

CASAREZ: Yes. It`s a good question, Connie, and you read my mind because that`s what I wanted to talk about next. To Alexis Weed, "NANCY GRACE" producer. Stephanie had a boyfriend. She had a friend who was an ex-boyfriend. Just sort of lay that out for us.

WEED: Right. Her current boyfriend at the time that she went missing, his name is Eric Maholmes. He was actually arrested shortly afterwards. He is currently in jail on charges of violating parole, 2003 drug charges. He was intoxicated, Jean. He was found with his friend. That was a parole violation for him. But later, in December of 2010, he had a federal indictment come down for possession and intent to distribute 28 grams of crack cocaine.

CASAREZ: So he was arrested on the 8th of October, which was before she went missing. So he was in the county jail at the time, correct?

WEED: That`s right.

CASAREZ: OK. So we can sort of discount him personally from being involved in anything.

We`re taking your calls. Juanita in South Carolina. Hi, Juanita.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. Yes, my question is, what kind of threats was she afraid of? That`s my first question. My second question is, was she involved in any drug activity?

CASAREZ: OK. To Pam Warnke, anchor/reporter, WAOW television in Wausau, Wisconsin. What about those threats, first of all? Do we know what they were?

WARNKE: We don`t know what they were. From what we understand, she was just saying that she feared for her life and that she didn`t want to be alone.

CASAREZ: OK. Didn`t want to be alone. To her family, Shelley Resch, Stephanie Low`s mother (SIC). Was your daughter involved in drugs?

BLAKE: No. No. From what I gather, her boyfriend was.

CASAREZ: OK. All right.

BLAKE: The police just -- OK.

CASAREZ: No, go ahead, please, Shelley.

BLAKE: OK. No, it`s Claudia, her mom. The police say that she wasn`t even on their radar until she met Eric Maholmes. They never even know she existed. So she wasn`t into drugs. She wasn`t a drug user, nothing like that.

CASAREZ: All right.

To tonight`s "Case Alert," the search for a missing 18-year-old California teen, Lauren Priskorn, seen on January 31st leaving a group home in Palmdale, mildly retarded. Lauren has the capacity of just a 13-year- old. She`s known to frequent the local Marie Cure (ph) Park. Lauren is 5- feet-2, 110 pounds with shoulder-length red hair, last seen wearing a black and red sweater, bluejeans and black jeans. (SIC) If you have any information, please call Crimestoppers, 1-800...

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

LOW: I do not know what happened to my daughter.

BLAKE: She was afraid.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`m scared, most definitely scared.

BLAKE: Somebody was threatening her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The longer it goes on, the worse it`s going to be.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Don`t be afraid. Everyone wants you just to come home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If somebody did something wrong, somebody needs to pay.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Stephanie Low only went missing four months ago in Wausau, Wisconsin. She had a night out at a tavern with some friends. The friends dropped her home. She made a call to her brother, talking to his (SIC) future sister-in-law, saying, I`m scared, I don`t want to be here alone. And that`s the last that anybody ever heard from her.

I want to go out to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. Marc Klaas, you realize that when the family finally got into the apartment, they had to break the lock. So the door was locked. She was gone, but all the sheets weren`t there. There was blood on the floor, the nightstand near the bed, and one slipper was in that apartment. One of her bedroom slippers was gone.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: And this paints a very disturbing portrait. I would suggest that although Stephanie may not have been into drugs, she was involved with a man who was very much into one of the worst, most insidious drugs on the planet, crack cocaine, and that there might be a connection there.

And I would also suggest that she was so afraid that she didn`t want to go outside. She didn`t want to go from her door to a taxicab to go to her brother`s house. I think a very real possibility is that whoever came into that house had his or her own key and that that may have been secured through the boyfriend or through some other nefarious character that she might have inadvertently been running around with.

CASAREZ: Very interesting. Joining us tonight is Detective Greg Hagenbucher. He is the lead detective on this case that is working it hard. Detective, have you given any polygraphs to those she knew in her life?

HAGENBUCHER: Yes. I can tell you that we`ve asked for and -- polygraphs from at least 10 people, and they`ve agreed to them. But by Wisconsin statute, I can`t tell you the results of those, if there was any, or if they actually happened.

CASAREZ: Were there any fibers that you found in or around the bed that you have sent to have forensically tested?

HAGENBUCHER: No. We did not find any fibers around the bed. We took some property from the house -- bathroom faucets, a mop, some other items from the house that we thought we might be able to find DNA or some other type of evidence on. And those were sent to the state crime lab in Madison, Wisconsin, and the only DNA that was found on our items was the DNA of Stephanie Low.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Threats from who? Who was leaving threats?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We don`t know. And if we did know, we can`t comment on any names.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

CLAUDIA BLAKE, MOTHER MISSING 22-YEAR-OLD, STEPHANIE LOW: All I know is she was afraid. Somebody was threatening her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The victim of recent threats, 22-year-old Stephanie Low, was afraid. So afraid, she calls her brother extremely worried, wanting him to come over to the house, but Stephanie`s brother instructs her to get into a cab and come over to his place to spend the night. Stephanie never heard from again.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I do not know what happened to my daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`m scared. I mean, I`m most definitely scared.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My worst fear is that we ain`t never going to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That`s probably what I think about the most.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stephanie was on the phone firming up plans with her brother`s girlfriend, but she hangs up. They call back and can`t reach Stephanie.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s just the way the call ended. It was -- she got frantic.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stephanie`s loved ones head over to the house to check on her later that day. From the outside, everything seems fine, but inside the home, there`s no sign of Stephanie.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There were some things that we found in the apartment that were unusual that could have, could lead us to believe there possibly has been some harm done to her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Cops say they have reason to believe the 22-year- old taken against her will. Stephanie`s family and friends won`t give up until they can bring Stephanie home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want to find her as fast as we can, because we know the chances of her being OK are better the sooner we can find her.

BLAKE: Don`t be afraid. I know a lot`s going on, and you`re probably overwhelmed. Don`t be. Just call. Everyone wants you to just come home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting, and neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents, gone, but where?

Tonight, live, Wisconsin. A 22-year-old beauty, Stephanie Low, calls her brother on a Saturday night asking him to stay at her house, saying she`s afraid after getting a series of threats. Stephanie`s brother and his girlfriend tell her they`re low on gas and take a taxi over to their place, but suddenly, mid-conversation Stephanie hangs up. A call back goes straight to voicemail. friends head to her house. Everything looks normal.

The front door locked, but once inside, no Stephanie. Blood on the bed. The sheets gone. Cell phone, keys, missing. Purse and wallet, left behind. Police say evidence proves Stephanie was taken against her will. Tonight, who took 22-year-old Stephanie Low? Right now, back to Jean Casarez. Jean, give me the timeline.

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, "IN SESSION": OK. Here is the timeline. It all starts on Saturday night, October 9th, 2010. So, it was last fall, about 8:00 in the evening. She`s at a tavern with friends enjoying herself, we believe. She made a call to her brother. She wanted to talk to her brother. She couldn`t reach him.

We don`t really know what she wanted to say to him, but after her friends take her, we believe, home, at 12:38, she makes another call talking to her future sister-in-law saying, I`m scared, I don`t want to be here alone, have my brother come and stay with me for the night.

Well, they didn`t have enough gas in their car. They said to her, get a cab, then she hung up, and she was never heard from again. I want to go to Pam Warnke. She is an anchor reporter with WAOW television in Wausau, Wisconsin. Here`s the thing that I think was an initial fact that makes this so sad and so suspicious. She had two dogs that she loved, and she left with those dogs totally unattended to with food or water or anything in the next few days.

PAM WARNKE, ANCHOR REPORTER, WAOW: That`s right. And her parents told us that that was totally uncharacteristic of her. She had always loved those dogs and cared for them and always made arrangements for them to be cared for if she couldn`t do it herself. So, they knew something was wrong just based on that.

CASAREZ: To Alexis Weed, just go over it one more time. How many phone calls did she make in the hours before she went missing?

ALEXIS WEED, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Right, Jean. Just in those last hours, she had made 40 phone calls, and within the last day and week, she had made hundreds of phone calls on one of two cell phones. She had two cell phones that she carried with her, but they were not able to -- police were not able to triangulate and locate exactly where all of those calls had come from and to.

CASAREZ: To Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler," joining us tonight from Washington, D.C. What do you make of this, Pat?

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, Jean, I`m with Marc Klaas on this one. I think he nailed it quite well. I do also agree that she was involved in something probably a little unsavory or at least an unsavory group of people. I don`t think this is a romantic-type of thing going on here. I think she was scared, and I think she was angry at the same time like was said in the phone call.

I believe that, yes, she did know the people that came to her home, and I believe there was more than one. I`m guessing that they did hold her down on that bed which is why we see blood in just a very small area, and that her shoe was probably still with her within those sheets. So, I think they probably assaulted her there and then took her out unconscious or worse out of that location. So yes, I think Marc Klaas has got it right.

CASAREZ: Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst, director of cold case squad, Pine Lake PD, joining us from Atlanta. OK. What do they do next? They`ve taken ten polygraphs. So, they`re really working this case. Forensically, they didn`t find hairs, fibers, or any other type of DNA at the apartment except Stephanie`s. So, what`s next?

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: They back up. And here`s what they`re going to do, Jean, she knew that the person that was threatening her could be violent. That`s why she took it so seriously, but why would she call her brother and not police? Because something was dirty. Something was not right which occurred.

For example, and this is a theory, if her boyfriend is into drugs, maybe there was money in the house. Maybe she knew where the money was, and they were coming to get it and, you know, a fight ensued. Some threats were ensued, but she took them seriously. She knew she was in danger.

CASAREZ: Want to go to Shelley Resch who is the future sister-in-law of Stephanie Low. Shelley, you were the closest friend to Stephanie. What do you think happened here?

SHELLEY RESCH, BEST FRIEND & FUTURE SISTER-IN-LAW OF MISSING 22-YEAR- OLD, STEPHANIE LOW: I don`t know what happened. Whatever happened -- I know something happened that night to her, whether she was taken and is in hiding somewhere or is being held for something or they murdered her or -- but I have no idea. I just want her back. Everybody loved her, and there`s no -- it makes no sense why she`s not sitting next to us today. I don`t know what happened that night, but I know whatever happened it wasn`t good whatever it was.

CASAREZ: To Claudia Blake, joining us, alongside Shelley, Stephanie Low`s mother. What message do you have to your daughter tonight?

BLAKE: That I love her. I love her so much. I miss her. I miss her every single moment. My life is on hold until I find her. I can`t breathe sometimes just wondering what happened to her. My message to her is, I just want her to come home.

CASAREZ: And your message to anyone that has any information on this?

BLAKE: Anybody, there`s somebody out there that knows what`s happened to my daughter or where she is. Just imagine if it was your family member. Wouldn`t you want to know? Wouldn`t you need to know? So, please come forward. Please. This hurts way too much. I wouldn`t wish it upon my worst enemy to go through this. So, please just come forward.

CASAREZ: And tonight, please help us find missing woman, Evelyn Frisco, 42 years old. She vanishes July 28th, 2004, from New Haven, Connecticut. She`s a white female, 5`2", 125 pounds, blond hair, blue eyes. If you have any information, call 203-946-6316.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Tonight, live, Wisconsin, 22-year-old beauty, Stephanie Low, calls her brother on a Saturday night, asking him to stay at her house. Saying she`s afraid after getting a series of threats. Stephanie`s brother and his girlfriend tell her they`re low on gas and take a taxi over to their place, but suddenly, mid-conversation, Stephanie hangs up. A call back goes straight to voicemail. Friends head to her house, everything looks normal.

The front door locked, but once inside, no Stephanie. Blood on the bed. The sheets gone. Cell phone, keys, missing. Purse and wallet, left behind. Police say evidence proves Stephanie was taken against her will. Tonight, who took 22-year-old Stephanie Low?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stephanie Low`s disappearance shocked her family.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I do not know what happened to my daughter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The last time anyone heard from her, she was on the phone with her brother`s girlfriend, but she sounded frantic.

BLAKE: She was afraid. Somebody was threatening her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Suddenly, the phone call ended.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Her father says he`s just trying to keep it together.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`m scared. I mean, I`m most definitely scared. The longer it goes on, the worst it`s going to be.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: At this point, we are keeping all options open as to where she may be. If she chose to go somewhere on her own or if somebody came and picked her up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They don`t have a specific suspect, but the entire detective bureau is working the case.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Or if possibly someone took her against her will, we just don`t know at this point.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And Stephanie`s dad is looking for answers, too. He says he won`t give up until his little girl is found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If somebody did something wrong, somebody needs to pay.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Stephanie Low, 22 years old, she loved children. She wanted to become or even own her own daycare. Those were her goals. She had goals. She has aspirations. And police say, they believe she could be alive.

To Doug Burns, defense attorney, joining us out of New York. Do you realize that she made 40 phone calls within the last hour before she went missing? That`s panic. That means something, Doug Burns. And furthermore, isn`t it a coincidence, there are no suspects in this case, no person of interest, but isn`t it coincidence that her boyfriend has a probation violation, goes to jail 24 hours or so before she goes missing?

DOUG BURNS, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Yes, there`s no question that this was a series of escalating threats, but I think a lot of the other guests have gotten very, very close, in my opinion, to what`s really going on, and they`ve said it in a diplomatic way which is good, but the reality is, there`s no question that she had been inserted into a world with a lot of players and a lot of dramatic persona that need to be looked at very closely.

There could be motivations, for example, of those who wanted to harm or do something bad against the boyfriend in a drug context, OK, and it emanated from that. And that`s what the guests have been saying, and that`s sort of my opinion.

CASAREZ: To Paula Bloom, clinical psychologist, joining us tonight from Atlanta. People, places and things, the company you keep. How do you get out of a situation of people that you shouldn`t be hanging around?

PAULA BLOOM, PSY.D., CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: You know, it`s so easy, 20/20 is hindsight. What`s amazing to me about this woman is that she had good instincts at the end there. She knew something was wrong, and this is what`s very important for us to pay attention to. It`s like, yes, it`s, you know, we are extremely susceptible to the influence of others. Some of us more, some of us less, but if you`re vulnerable, and there`s romance and those kinds of things, our guard is down a lot of times.

CASAREZ: Yes, very true. To Elsie in New Mexico. Hi, Elsie from New Mexico.

ELSIE, NEW MEXICO: Hi, how are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thanks for calling.

ELSIE: Yes. My concern is about the boyfriend`s drug problems that she overheard a drug deal or something, and those people threatened her life. And evidently, her life was just threatened before she disappeared, and her family didn`t know about it until she calls that night.

CASAREZ: I think you have an interesting theory. We do have the detective on this investigation that is aggressively leading before (ph) here. Greg Hagenbucher joining us from Wausau, Wisconsin. I`m sure you`re going through all avenues here, but you said early in the show that you believe that Stephanie could be alive. What message do you have tonight for anyone that knows anything about what happened to her?

VOICE OF GREG HAGENBUCHER, CAPT`S DET. WAUSAU, POLICE DEPT.: Well, first of all, I want the family to be assured that we`ll never rest until we find her also, but we want to get the message out that anybody that has any information, you can remain anonymous. You know, you can contact your show, you can contact our marathon county crime stoppers or you can contact the Wausau Police Department.

There are rewards that are out there. There are fliers that are out there. I think the families have placed them as far south as Chicago, Illinois. And anyone with information, the next tip might be the lead that leads us to locating Stephanie. And you know, for the parents and other family members, rest assured we will be working on this until we locate her.

CASAREZ: This is a beautiful, beautiful girl. Stephanie Low, 22 years old, 5 feet 2 inches tall, 135 pounds, brown haired, blue-eyed, beauty as you can see. To Katrina in Maryland. Hi, Katrina.

KATRINA, MARYLAND: Hi. My question is, have the police looked at the records, the telephone records to see who it was that was sending her the texts, threatening her? And is it possible that someone could have been in the apartment when she was talking to her sister-in-law on the phone?

CASAREZ: OK. Alexis Weed joining us from New York. What can you tell us about the texts that were threatening? Has that person been talked to, even polygraph?

WEED: Yes. Police are telling us that that person has been talked to. We just have not learned the identification of that person. So, we`re just waiting to hear from cops, you know, whether or not they`ll elaborate on that at some point in the future.

CASAREZ: And you know, Katrina, it sounds like this is one more person they`re interested in, but that person has not been arrested at this point. So, obviously, they`re looking in other directions. Dorothy in Ohio. Hi, Dorothy.

DOROTHY, OHIO: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

DOROTHY: I just want to know how come her friends, they had to know what was going on. You know what I`m saying? They had to know in the bar what she was at. Why they never end up looking as to what was going on or they never seen that she was scared at the bar and why nobody stayed with her.

CASAREZ: Good question. Shelley Resch, who is a friend of Stephanie Low`s. Have you spoken with the friends that she was at at the tavern that night? And what did they say that she said to them?

RESCH: I haven`t spoken with the people that she was with, no, but I do know from the bartender that she took one sip out of her drink, an expensive drink, and then ended up leaving immediately. She was on her phone all night, and then she just took a sip and then left. So -- and then she went to her apartment.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, father, mother disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Taranika Raymond disappeared from New Orleans, Louisiana in 1995. With every day that passes, her mother`s resolve only grows.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Taranika was a bright, beautiful girl. She had straight As in school. She did everything a child was supposed to do. Taranika liked to play ball, go to the skating rink. She had nice hobbies that she liked to do. Singing is she loved (INAUDIBLE). She used to be in a choir singing. Play bingo. She was a normal everyday child.

When she went missing, I wasn`t eating, I wasn`t, you know, sleeping. I`m like, Lord, I have four more kids, and therefore, you know, I got to be there for them. One of these days, I`m going to see my daughter again.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Esther Westonbarger is an endangered missing adult who vanished from Kokomo, Indiana, in 2009. She has a tattoo of a parachute with wings on her left ankle. Her car, a gold Cadillac, with Ohio plates reading Miss Esther is also missing.

Amanda Gallion and her family had just moved to Gillette, Wyoming before she went missing in 1997. Her father remembers it as if it was yesterday.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She never even made it to school. School never contacted us that she was not present in her classroom, and it wasn`t until 6:00 that evening when I had came home from work and realized that my daughter wasn`t around. She sang country and western music. She played the violin. She had never been away from home in her life. And Amanda and I had only been in the Gillette, Wyoming area for six weeks.

I took her to a beauty salon and had her hair and her fingernails done for the first time, and you know, she was my little girl. She loved it. She loved it. You know, it kind of made me more, you know, aware of things that, you know, my little girl`s growing up here, you know, I got to keep a better eye on her.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END

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NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Empty Re: NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE

Post by FystyAngel on Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:15 pm

February 14, 2011
Lori Ann Boffman: Nancy Grace America’s Missing


Posted: 08:37 PM ET
49-year-old Lori Ann Boffman has been missing for almost five years.

NANCY GRACE MISSING... 50 PEOPLE, 50 DAYS  ... TRANSCRIPTS ONLY PLEASE Boffma10

Reports say her family wants answers. Boffman was last seen when she went out for a drive on the evening of Aug. 5, 2006. The next day Boffman’s vehicle was found in a town over, abandoned and wrecked, but Boffman was no where to be found. She didn’t have a cell phone and she left her purse and identification at home. Police wonder if she was driving the vehicle or if it was someone else. Where is Lori Ann Boffman?

Tipline: 330-539-9830
Missing Since: August 5, 2006
Missing From: Liberty Township, Ohio
Classification: Missing
Age at Disappearance: 45
Height: 5’9”
Weight: 180 lbs
Eyes: Brown, wears glasses
Hair: Black
Scars: Scar on abdomen



Lori Boffman Vanishes, Car Still Running

Aired February 15, 2011 - 21:00:00 ET


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on the NANCY GRACE show.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This has never happened before. It`s not in her nature to disappear. It`s not normal.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing mom Lori Boffman.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Lori Boffman.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lori Boffman left a family picnic August 5th, 2006. She went out for a drive, leaving her purse and identification behind.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That was the last time anyone saw her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: There was no sign of Lori.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And hasn`t been seen since.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Lori`s car was found early the next morning in Youngstown.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lori`s car found abandoned and still running the next morning.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police say Lori`s vehicle may have been in an accident, but investigators have found no clue leading to the 45-year-old woman.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I don`t know what happened to her. Don`t know if she`s all right or not.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Everybody`s concerned and worried and fearing for what the problem might be because this has never happened before.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: As the family waits for answers, the FBI and Liberty police continue to investigate Lori`s disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lori`s daughter reportedly said her mother acted out of character in the days leading up to her disappearance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The change, she says, could have been connected to new diabetes medication her mother had been taking.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We were afraid that she`d maybe have an interaction with the new medication mixed with her old medications, and being that she has diabetes, she has passed out.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Now, Lori`s family is still hoping for answers as to what happened to her.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Where is Lori Boffman?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish, their families left waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we -- 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents. They are gone. But where?

Tonight, to the heartland, Liberty, Ohio. A beloved mother of three, Lori Boffman, heads out in her car August, 2006, leaving behind her purse, her ID, and diabetes meds. She`s never seen again. The car, a `92 blue Mercury Sable, found the very next day near a library one town over, apparently part of a fender-bender. But mysteriously, the key still in the car, the ignition, the engine still running. Also adding to the mystery, family says Lori had just won the lottery the night before she goes missing. Her children still waiting for Mommy to come home. Tonight, where is Lori?

Jean, what happened?

JEAN CASAREZ, "IN SESSION": Nancy, you`re not going to believe this, but she did win some lottery money. And she was so excited. She had so much to live for. And it was the morning of August 5th, 2006, actually, early in the morning. She went to the big supermarket because she was going to have a picnic that day with her relatives and her children. And she bought a lot of stuff because she had money. She`d won about $1,000 from the lottery.

I want to go out to Phil Trexler, joining us tonight from "The Akron Beacon Journal," reporter there joining us from Ohio. She went on and had that picnic that day with her friends and family. What happened after that?

PHIL TREXLER, "AKRON BEACON JOURNAL" (via telephone): That`s the, you know, part of the mystery here, Nancy (SIC). Good evening. She was -- left the party. Now, the people express some concern about her mood. She was adjusting to this new medication. But she was -- left the party, driving with a friend who was so concerned with her driving that he asked to get out of the car. That left her alone.

At some point after dropping off her companion, she crashes her vehicle. And again, the vehicle was found, engine still running and no sign of her. Her purse -- she left the house without her purse, without her cell phone. It`s not the type of person who would just vanish and leave, and you certainly don`t leave those valuable possessions behind. But it`s a heartbreaking mystery, and again, a family who has no closure here for nearly five years.

CASAREZ: One of the things that absolutely separates this case out from every other missing persons case that we`ve had thus far is that her car was found less than 12 hours later, running, with the keys in it and the door was open. It was still on. What does that mean?

I want to go to Natisha Lance, "NANCY GRACE" producer. Let`s look at the timeline here because on August 5th, 2006, there was this big barbecue and party at the park. How long did that take? And really go through with us what police believe happened after that.

NATISHA LANCE, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: After that, police believe that Lori, according to her family at least -- that she drove to a friend`s house to drop off the excess food that was from this barbecue. She had a friend who was with her. She dropped off the friend at that house. And she said, I`m going to go home and change clothes. I`ll be back here to get you.

Now, there`s also another theory that her family believes, and that is that she may have -- as Phil pointed out, that she may have had another friend who was with her. She was driving a little too fast. The friend asked to get out of the vehicle. And that may have been the last person who saw her.

But Jean, what you`re pointing out here is about the car. And that was the next day, on August 6th. Now, what police say is that they received a phone call at 4:18 AM in the morning. There was a disturbance with these vehicles in the neighbor`s back yard. They said that there was a big ruckus that was going on. When police arrived on the scene about 10 minutes later, they found Lori`s vehicle. A door was open on the car. There was damage to the passenger side of the car. It appeared as if the car had either hit a tree or hit a library because the car was in the lawn of a library -- keys still in the ignition and car running.

There were also glasses that were found in the car. There were nine keys that were on a key chain in the car. And also, there were some miscellaneous papers that were in the car.

Police were able to clear that scene by a little bit after 5:00 AM, and that means that at that point, when they were able to clear the scene, that the car had been towed away and impounded. Lori`s family did receive the car back back in October, and police did say that they processed the vehicle on October -- excuse me, August 8th. They were able to dust for prints, but they didn`t find anything in the car of evidentiary value.

CASAREZ: All right. Joining us tonight very specially is Chief Richard Tisone. He is of the Liberty, Ohio, Police Department, joining us from Youngstown, Ohio. Chief, thank you very much for joining us. I want to ask you, when you found the car, it was literally in the front lawn of the library?

CHIEF RICH TISONE, LIBERTY POLICE DEPARTMENT (via telephone): Yes. Actually, thank you for having me. The vehicle was found in a neighboring jurisdiction of ours, in Youngstown, Ohio. And they did find the car at approximately 3:12 in the morning. They towed it to the local tow yard, and the next day is when her niece came to our station in Liberty and reported her missing.

CASAREZ: So you say it appeared as though the car had been in an accident. And where was the damage on the vehicle?

TISONE: Well, the vehicle -- actually, the damage -- it went through some yards. It damaged a swing set. It did some yard damage. And it hit the side of the library.

CASAREZ: So do you think it was a one-car accident, the person driving the car was hitting...

TISONE: Well, there again, there were some witness that also heard some commotion, as well, just prior to the accident. We do believe it was a one-car accident in Youngstown.

CASAREZ: OK. And it`s those residents that actually called you, then, to go to the scene.

TISONE: Well, actually, they called the Youngstown Police Department, who responded and did, in fact, tow the car at that point.

CASAREZ: It`s been four years now, going on five years. She had a history. She had gone away before, right? But this is much, much different.

TISONE: That`s correct. There were a couple of instances, where we talked to family members, where she had disappeared for short periods of time, but never, never like this, obviously.

CASAREZ: What did you find -- where was her purse? And did she have a cell phone?

TISONE: Actually, her purse was left back in her apartment located here in Liberty, which our investigators did go to the residence right after the report was made on August the 7th. We checked the residence. There didn`t appear to be any signs of foul play there. But the purse and her belongings were still in her apartment.

CASAREZ: Had she just gone on that new medication for her diabetes? And wasn`t she just diagnosed with diabetes a little bit before that?

TISONE: According to her family members, that`s correct. She was under some different medication. And quite possibly -- they were concerned, you know, for her medical wellbeing.

CASAREZ: Talk to me about the grocery store that she went in that morning. She wasn`t alone, right? She was with someone else?

TISONE: That`s correct. She was with a gentleman -- we got a -- somewhat of a partial description. It was 4:00 o`clock in the morning. She had gone in there and ordered several hundred dollars worth of food because her daughter was in town from being away at college.

CASAREZ: Right. Right. But she actually didn`t go back to pick up all that food? Is that correct?

TISONE: That`s correct. She had ordered it. The bill came to about $500, and she never returned to pay it.

CASAREZ: All right. We are taking your calls live tonight. Barbara in North Carolina. Hi, Barbara.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. My question is, was there any insurance money left for her children?

CASAREZ: Insurance...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: With the policy?

CASAREZ: Insurance money for the children. Or how are the children doing? To Chief Richard Tisone joining us tonight. How are the children? Now, the children are older, so they`re really on their own, right?

TISONE: That`s correct. At the time -- she has two daughters and a son. And basically, the one daughter was in college. Actually, two were in college at the time. So they are older now, and they`re basically on their own at this point.

CASAREZ: All right. To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. What I just can`t stop thinking about, Marc Klaas, is a car that is running with a door open and the key`s in the ignition and body damage to the car. Somebody was acting fast for some reason.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: And she was having a bad day. She was moody. She was driving erratically later that evening, despite the fact that somebody had just come home, despite the fact that it should have been a good time for her. She was on new medications.

I think that a possibility exists that this lady may have just had an episode that sent her off. She may have, for whatever reason, decided that she didn`t want to interact anymore. I know that`s hard to fathom, but it certainly does happen. There are hundreds of thousands of homeless people all over the United States who, for whatever reason, have decided to simply drop out.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And it`s just really stressful not to know where your loved one is and not to know what`s going on or when it`s going to come to an end and when we can tell the kids something that`s going to give them some peace of mind.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A mother of three vanished without a trace. It`s left her family worried and scared. Her son just returned from his vacation. Family members say something is not right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scared because I don`t know what happened to her, or whatever. Don`t know if she`s all right or not.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Everybody`s concerned and worried and fearing for what the problem might be because this has never happened before. It`s not in her nature to disappear.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Lori`s car was near this library on Shehite (ph) Street on Youngstown`s east side, the key still in the ignition. It was the last time she was seen.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Family members have posted these signs all over the city, hoping someone knows something about Lori`s whereabouts. And they say her situation is very serious. She`s diabetic and needs her medication.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re afraid that she may be having an interaction to the new medication mixed with her old medications. And being that she has diabetes, she has passed out. And our main concern is that she may be passed out somewhere and can`t get help for herself.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. Lori Boffman was really at a good point in her life because he children were back in town. Her daughter had been in college and she was back visiting. Her son that was staying with relatives in Cincinnati was back in town. And there was a big party, a celebration. It was a happy day for Lori Boffman.

I want to go back out to Chief Richard Tisone, joining us tonight from the Liberty Police Department in Youngstown, Ohio. I know you`ve interviewed over 20 people. Did she have any enemies? Were there any issues that she was having at that point with others?

TISONE: Nothing that we could determine from any of the interviews. You know, obviously, we contacted all the health care facilities immediately, and we did interview, like I said, several dozen people. But we were unable to pinpoint anyone in particular and we did not hear anything negative about her at that time.

CASAREZ: Well, talking about what Marc Klaas just said, do you feel that this was foul play, or do you feel that she`s alive somewhere, part of the homeless population or someone that just had to get away?

TISONE: Well, you know, based on the fact she did not take advantage of any of her finances over the past five years, we`re basically thinking there was some foul play involved. However, that -- the other scenario is obviously a consideration.

CASAREZ: How much money had she just won from the lottery?

TISONE: It`s my understanding $1,000, just prior to this event.

CASAREZ: That`s a lot of money. Taking your calls. Chrystina in Tennessee. Hi, Chrystina.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Hi. I was trying to find out if she -- well, she has no ID because she didn`t bring her purse -- if there was anyone that checked in to either the psychiatric hospital or -- because she was on different medicine, she might have acted strange and somebody picked her up because she wandered off from her car, and if someone without an ID went to a local hospital or somewhere?

CASAREZ: That`s a very good question. Chief Richard Tisone joining us from Ohio. Did you check the hospitals, mental facilities, anything like that in the surrounding areas?

TISONE: Yes. In fact, when the report was made on the 7th, that was one of the first areas that we check whenever we`re looking for a missing person. Obviously, we checked every hospital and we did not get a positive response at that point.

CASAREZ: OK. To Pat Brown, criminal profiler, author of "The Profiler," joining us from Washington, D.C. What are your thoughts on all of this? The You know, neighbor that called police originally because of the disturbance and that`s how they found her car still running -- they said vehicles in the area were causing a disturbance. So possibly more than just hers was involved in all that.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Yes. Actually thinking it`s a bit of a manic thing going on. We`re seeing that she both (ph) had some psychological issues earlier. She`d disappeared earlier. She`s on new meds and she was acting strange that day. She`s out very late in the morning, running around, buying $500 worth of groceries. I don`t think I`ve bought that much for just one person coming to town. So she may have been out with other people. Maybe her car, another car was behind her, she was running around and something did go wrong. She crashed her car and went off with the other people, or they took her off. I also think there`s some foul play involved at some point. Where, I don`t know.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: As the family waits for answers, the FBI and Liberty police continue to investigate Lori`s disappearance. The family is concerned that Lori may have had a bad reaction to a new medication she was taking for her diabetes. Where is Lori Boffman?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: She last seen August 5th, 2006. The Ohio native went for a drive around 6:30 PM that night. She did not take her purse or any form of identification. Lori`s car was found early the next morning in Youngstown and appeared to have been in an accident. Lori`s car was still reportedly running, but there was no sign of Lori.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lori`s daughter fears her mother could have suffered a negative reaction to medication she had recently started taking for diabetes. Police say Lori`s vehicle may have been in an accident, but investigators have found no clue leading to the 45-year-old woman.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Look at this face, Lori Boffman. Look at it. Study it. She lived in Liberty, Ohio. Her car was found with the engine running in Youngstown, Ohio. Her two pair of glasses were left in the car. She needs her glasses. She wears glasses.

We are taking your calls live. Syler in Nebraska. Hi, Syler.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: How are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I have a question. Could it possibly be amnesia?

CASAREZ: Amnesia. Interesting. To Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. After covering so many of these cases -- she did have issues -- do you believe amnesia or another medical issue could have caused all of this?

KLAAS: Well, I believe perhaps a medical issue might have caused something. I`m not qualified to speak on amnesia one way or the other. I`m sorry, I just can`t go there.

CASAREZ: To Chief Richard Tisone. Did you look at the medical issues that she could have had? And you`re saying that she didn`t cash her checks, she didn`t renew her driver`s license, and that has led you down the road of foul play, rather than voluntarily leaving her home.

TISONE: That`s correct. You know, we -- like I said, we obviously look into the medical condition first whenever somebody goes missing. The family did inform us that she had some issues. But being that it`s been five years, I would have -- we were hopeful by now we`d have heard something, but we -- as of right now, we do not. So we do suspect foul play at this point.

CASAREZ: Ray Giudice, defense attorney joining us from Atlanta. What are your thoughts on voluntarily leaving or foul play? Because look, if she hasn`t cashed her Social Security checks, I understand that, but she didn`t take any ID. She left her purse and everything in her apartment, so how could you cash a check if you don`t have ID on you?

RAYMOND GIUDICE, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Jean, I`m old-fashioned and believe that middle-aged women -- this woman was almost 50 at the time -- don`t just disappear and leave their life and family. I agree with the chief. Being a diabetic, she could have gone into a diabetic shock, which might have made her a victim of a crime where she was unable to protect herself, disoriented, and became a victim of harm.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: This has never happened before. It`s not in her nature to disappear. It`s not normal.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing mom, Lori Boffman.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Lori Boffman.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Lori Boffman left a family picnic August 5th, 2006. She went out for a drive leaving her purse and identification behind.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That was the last time anyone saw her.